First Green House Home in Indiana Opens!

By / Posted on May 25th, 2016

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MAY 23, 2016

NOT YOUR GRANDMOTHERS NURSING HOME

GREEN HOUSE COTTAGES OF CARMEL OPENS TRANSFORMATIVE NEW CAMPUS IN CARMEL, INDIANA

Carmel, IN – Melody DeCollo, Director of Green House Cottages of Carmel, in partnership with THE GREEN HOUSE®, is pleased to announce the arrival of their first elder, the first Green House resident in the state of Indiana.

Green House Cottages of Carmel features six homes on its Carmel, IN campus. Following The Green House model of care, each home is complete with 12 private suites, an open kitchen and dining area, hearth room, den, outdoor living area, salon, and therapy room. Staff members receive hundreds of hours of training that equip them to provide 4x more direct contact than a traditional nursing home.

“Moving in our first elder is a major milestone for us. It is exciting to see our team put their extensive training into real life practice. Everyone is ready to expand to the additional cottages that will open up over the next few weeks,” said DeCollo.

The official Grand Opening is scheduled for August, but members of the Carmel community are already showing their support for this transformative approach to senior care. The reservation list is filling up quickly with elders and their family members who need long-term care, memory care, or rehabilitation services but want an alternative to traditional nursing homes. One mother and daughter recently recorded an interview about why they chose Green House Cottages of Carmel. See the interview at GreenHouseSeniorLiving.com/Peace.

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Green House Cottages of Carmel is Indiana’s first Green House Project location. Providing long-term care, memory care and rehabilitation services in a custom cottage that feels like home. Each cottage features private master suites, a large great room, and dining room. We proudly accept Medicare, Medicaid, private pay and other insurances. Learn more at GreenHouseSeniorLiving.com.

Press Contact

Name: Gina Middaugh Mobile: 317-910-2845

Email:   GMiddaugh@GreenHouseSeniorLiving.com


Green House Team Presents to Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at California State University Long Beach

By / Posted on May 14th, 2016

IMG_1646Green House team members were honored to share their wisdom and insight about the Green House model on the evening of May 11th— the presentation was part of the Successful Aging Lecture Series, a program made possible through the generous donation by Lori and Don Brault.

CU Claire

Green House Project Guide, Claire Lucas moderated the panel of staff from Mt. San Antonio Gardens in Pomona, California.  A large group of interested community members were eager to learn about the model and to hear the special stories from the team members.

Andrea Tyck, Diana Marohn, Amanda Phos & Mary Jean Neault shared personal experiences working in the Green House homes.  Mary Jean was able to share her insight both as a staff member and former family member.  The audience was touched by their stories and eager to learn more about Green House homes, as evidenced by the swarm of people who stood in line to talk to staff from Mt. San Antonio Gardens after the program!

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is a national organization that offers widely varied courses of interest to persons 50 years of age or older.  There is no academic prerequisite for admission or to participate in the classes, just a desire to learn.

California currently has two Green House Project homes in the state.  We are hopeful with California’s plans to release new “Small House Regulations” that many more will be built in the future!


Don’t We Deserve Better?

By / Posted on May 12th, 2016

via McKnights:

rutakadonoff320_975427Executive Director of the Pioneer Network, and former Green House team member, Ruta Kadonoff, asks this question in light of an investigation concerning the state of South Dakota. 

 

A recent Department of Justice investigation takes the state of South Dakota to task under the Americans with Disabilities Act for high utilization of nursing homes to serve people – old and young – living with disabilities. I found the story disturbing, but not for the reasons you might think.

This wasn’t the news we have come to periodically expect when something sensational happens.  What really hit me was that the places described did not sound like bad apples.  As far as was evident, there was nothing egregious. In fact, one might say the picture painted by the DOJ is that of a pretty typical, garden-variety nursing home.

Click here to continue reading the entire guest column.


Green House Leadership Featured at Association of Jewish Aging Services Conference

By / Posted on April 25th, 2016

“Do not cast me away when I am old; do not forsake me when my strength is gone.” –Psalm 71:9

The Green House Project and Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) share many common values, and are proud partners in elder care innovation.  Recently, Green House leadership participated in the AJAS annual meeting to share insights and connect with organizations who share a similar mission to serve elders.

ajas2016_658Senior Director, Susan Ryan, was highlighted as a speaker for “AJAS Speaks”, a TED Talk style session, where thought leaders share their experiences and perspectives.  In her talk, “Living the Good Life”, Susan shares the path that has shaped her personal mission to see the people living with dementia as creative, resourceful and whole.

Innovation Roundtables are a feature of the conference where leaders of the field share insights in short, rotating sessions.  Green House Director of Outreach, Scott Brown, delivered a talk on the power of differentiation in our changing and dynamic health care landscape.

We appreciate the opportunity to partner with innovative organizations as we work to change the paradigm of aging, creating caring homes and meaningful lives.

Please watch for a blog series in the near future entitled “Living the Good Life” based on the stories shared by Susan at the AJAS conference.


Leonard Florence Center Opens Third Specialized Green House Home

By / Posted on April 24th, 2016

When the decision was first made to build Green House homes, Barry Berman, CEO, Chelsea Jewish Foundation, said we knew the model was “extremely special, extremely unique and wondered what other vulnerable populations in addition to elders we could serve.  We challenged ourselves knowing that these individuals would probably be on Medicaid.”  As a mission driven organization they opened their 10 Green House homes with one dedicated to individuals living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS, and one to individuals living with Multiple Sclerosis or MS.  An amazing achievement.

Today, they are excited to open another home for ALS individuals, the Dapper McDonald ALS Residence, thanks to a generous donation from the Dapper McDonald family as well as a group of individuals from New York who assisted in the process.

As Barry explained individuals with ALS are “transformed overnight” in the ALS Green House homes.  They gain “such profound independence”.  Below is the announcement of the new home.

We applaud all those who helped make the Dapper McDonald ALS Residence a reality!

lfclThe Dapper McDonald ALS Residence at the Leonard Florence Center for Living is now open! Due to an extremely generous donation of $3.5 million – and a commitment to raise $9 million in additional funds – the Chelsea Jewish Foundation was able to open a second home for individuals with ALS. The Center’s first home, the Steve Saling ALS Residence, opened in 2010 and has received world-wide acclaim; the Slifka MS Residence is devoted to residents living with MS.

“We are so pleased to be able to offer another residence to individuals with ALS,” states Chelsea Jewish Foundation CEO Barry Berman. “There is such an incredible need for these homes, but the operating costs are extremely high. Thankfully, this donation has helped turn our dream of a second ALS home into reality.”

Richard “Dapper” McDonald was a New York businessman who was diagnosed with ALS in 2008. The news came as a shock to the entire family as it was something completely unfamiliar to them. Over the next seven months, the family took their lead from Dapper. He never slowed down or quit. He went to work every day and continued running his business despite the constant struggle. On July 15, 2009, nine months after his diagnosis, Dapper passed from ALS.

After touring the Center in an effort to replicate the home in New York, the family soon realized it was too difficult to develop the staff and technology that was already in place in Boston. As a result, a group of New York residents have donated a $3.5 million leadership gift and have committed to raising $12.5 million in total.

Welcome to all of our new Dapper McDonald residents! We are thrilled to have you join the Chelsea Jewish family.

 

For the last six years, Patrick O’Brien, has lived in the ALS residence.  Barry Berman describes him “as the most amazing individual I have ever met”.  Read below the story about Patrick’s movie and where to watch it.  The documentary is an amazing story and as Barry explained, Patrick “will always credit The Green House Project for giving him back his life”.

Leonard Florence Center Resident Living with ALS Directed and Produced an Award Winning Documentary!

The amazing documentary film, Transfatty Lives, directed and produced by Leonard Florence Center resident Patrick O’Brien, had its Boston premiere at the Revere Showcase Cinema in Revere on Sunday, April 3. The film won the 2015 Audience Award at the Tribeca and Milano Film Festivals, and is a featured selection in film festivals all across the world.patrick o'Brien

Transfatty Lives takes one on an emotional rollercoaster from Patrick’s wild, fun-loving days as a DJ and filmmaker into the heart of living with ALS. With the support of his friends and family, Patrick braves the unthinkable and turns his camera onto himself. He is able to capture all of the emotion, humor, and absurdity of real life – falling in love and fathering a child along the way.

All proceeds benefit the Patrick O’Brien Foundation. If you missed the premiere, you can still get Transfatty Lives on demand:  Amazon, iTunes, Vimeo

Link to Boston Globe article about Patrick


Momentum Builds in 2016: Green House Homes Open Across the Country

By / Posted on March 26th, 2016

home croppedMichigan can be a cold location in January for a Grand Opening of Green House homes, but it was certainly warm and welcoming on the inside!  These two homes were developed by Kalkaska Memorial Health Center.  415The festivities included a number of leaders from the area, along with Elders, families, staff and members of the press.  Lela, an elder moving into one of the homes attended the special Grand Opening event with special anticipation.  She had started the countdown to her move 191 days earlier and was most excited about her new home.

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This organization is not new to culture change having been an Eden certified home for 15 years, however the opening of the skilled nursing Green House homes takes their journey to a whole new level!  They opened the first home to 10 elders on January 14th and the second will open soon once the licensing process is completed.

 

Renee Cunningham, Service Line Director of Nursing, explained that the opening and move went smoothly and that the past two months have been great.  “It went really well, better than I had expected by our both the community and residents!  Staff feel very committed to the homes, and family members often stay and have meals with their loved ones.  It’s such a warm environment”.   Renee went on to say that Lela has expressed many times that moving to the Green House home “was the best decision she’s ever made”.  Renee explained that Lela has “blossomed” in the home.

Those thoughts are echoed by team member, Dana DeRousse, “The opening of the Dana DeRousse_cropped_shahbaz_KalkaskaGreen House homes have been a phenomenal and humbling experience for me.  It doesn’t feel like I’m coming to work, more so coming into a home of myfamilymembers.  Being a Concierge CNA [their Shahbaz] is the kind of health care experience I was looking for when I first became a CNA.  It also challenges me as a person to try new things, like cooking that I really had no prior experience with.  I would highly recommend a position in a Green House home to anyone who is working as a CNA and I feel like The Green House Project is the absolute future of long term care”.

We congratulate the team at Kalkaska on their opening and look forward to many more Green House Homes opening in 2016:

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Green House Cottages of Carmel, Carmel, IN

6 Green House homes

Spring 2016

 

 

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The Woodlands, John Knox Village, Pompano Beach, FL

12 Green House Homes

May 26th Grand Opening

 

 

Washington County

 

 

 

Washington County Nursing Home, Akron, CO

4 Green House homes

Summer 2016 opening

 

 

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Cedar Sinai Park, Portland, OR

4 Green House homes

Summer 2016 opening

 

 

 

Clark Lindsey March 2016

 

 

Clark Lindsey, Urbana, IL

2 Green House homes

Fall 2016

 

 

JGS lifecare

 

 

JGS Lifecare, Longmeadow, MA

2 Green House homes

Fall 2016

 

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Presbyterian Villages of Michigan,   Detroit, MI

2 Green House homes – 1st PACE program

Winter of 2016


Personalized Care Creates Real Homes for Elders

By / Posted on March 25th, 2016

kiplinger_horizontalThe Green House model “goes to the idea that regardless of age people still have a chance to have a meaningful life where they can experience joy and create value,” Scott Brown, Director of Outreach, The Green House Project says.  In a recent article Kiplinger Retirement News editor, Susan Garland, visits two Green House organizations, Leonard Florence Center for Living and Eddy Village Green and shares her experience with this innovative model:

It’s a common refrain that adult children hear from their parents: “No matter what, promise that you’ll never put me in a nursing home.” These seniors obviously have not visited a Green House, a unique alternative to the traditional nursing facility.

By highlighting the comprehensive transformation that occurs when an organization implements The Green House model, Garland is able to show that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and that the cornerstone of the model’s effectiveness is the deep relationships that form as a result: “In the traditional nursing home, you don’t have time to develop the relationships that you have in these homes,” says James Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green. “When you have the same group of people taking care of the same group of elders, you get to know what they like and don’t like.”

old and young hand

old and young hand

 

To read more stories and experiences from these Green House homes, read the full article here>>


What Could Be Better Than A Weekend In New York City Before Attending Green House Educator!

By / Posted on March 15th, 2016

Twice a year The Green House Educator program is held at The Eddy Village Green in New York.  It’s a week long, very intense program to prepare educators from each organization to teach The Green House curricula on site and continue to meet the organizations needs for staff education and growth.Educator 2016 March 006

During the past session held earlier this month, team members from Colorado decided to seize the travel opportunity and see the big city before attending Educator.  As we often say “it’s all about relationships” and this adventure certainly provided an opportunity for a little team building!

Thanks to Libbie Schuetz, Jamie Arfsten and Amber Morgan from the Washington County Nursing Home in Akron, Colorado for writing the blog below and sharing some fun pictures of their special weekend.  

 

New York City!times square

After being asked to become educators for our home we were told that the education was going to be in Albany New York.  The first thing we all thought was New York City.  We all three agreed that we would probably never get another opportunity to be so close to the city again.  So it was decided that we would leave 2 days early and fly into the city.

It was a great adventure and so much to take in, from Time Square, to the Statue of Liberty, and more.  The best part of New York City was all of the lights and people in Time Square.

first taxi rideThe biggest adventure of the trip might very well have been the taxi ride from the airport to the hotel.  It was the first time any of us had been in a taxi and wow how they drive in the city!  On Sunday we rode the mega bus to Albany.  NYC gift shopThe most accurate description that anyone in New York gave us was, in New York you walk, stand in line, and eat, which was very true.  It was a trip of a lifetime giving us great memories and the opportunity to get to know each other better.


Reclaiming Elderhood

By / Posted on February 25th, 2016

Andrea Tyck is the Wellness Director at Mt San Antonio Gardens, a Life Care Community in Pomona, California.  She is also a Green House Educator and helped to open the first Green House homes in California.

Andrea Tyck, Green House Educator, Mt. San Antonio Gardens, Pomona, CA

Andrea Tyck, Green House Educator, Mt. San Antonio Gardens, Pomona, CA

In Jerry Spinelli’s book Hokey Pokey, Hokey Pokey is a place where there are no adults. Kids are in charge and free to roam.  The main character, Jack, is the de facto leader and is loving his life until things start to change.  A tattoo, present on the bellies of all the inhabitants of Hokey Pokey, begins to fade.  When his bike, the symbol of his power and influence is stolen, he oddly begins to adjust to its absence. And what’s worse is that his enduring disdain for girls and a girl named Jubilee, in particular, is beginning to lose its grip.  She might even become a friend.   In addition Jack begins to sense that he is going to be leaving Hokey Pokey although he doesn’t  know why or how.  Jack tells Jubilee he thinks he is leaving that night.  When she asks “How do you know?” he replies “I don’t. It’s like” – he stares up into her eyes – “I’m on a bike I can’t steer, can’t stop.”  “So….,” she says, “Where to?”  He hangs full weight from her eyes.  “Beats me.”

The book cover explains that it is “a timeless tale of growing up and letting go, of reverence and remembrance of that moment in childhood when the world opens up to possibilities never before imagined.”   Ever since I read it I have been thinking of how the process of children becoming adults might be similar to the process of adults becoming elders.

Dr. Bill Thomas makes a case that elderhood is a distinct part of human development and that part of the process of that development is leaving adulthood. In very broad terms that means moving from a primary focus on doing and generating to embracing the “being-rich responsibilities of making peace, giving wisdom, and creating a legacy.”  In the land of Hokey Pokey, Jack’s transition out of childhood is perceptible but vague.  The reader has a sense of what might be happening to Jack (he is growing up) but the steps are still somewhat confounding.  Might that be similarly true of one’s growth out of adulthood and development into elderhood?  Are there signs that the purposes in your life and the mechanisms by which you enjoy, ponder and resolve things have been transformed?    Are there treasured parts of you or your life that you no longer have (like Jack’s bike) that you realize you are ok without?

The book ends with Jack back in the “real world” preparing to redo his bedroom with his dad to make it less childish.  There is a sense of hope, that all is right.  That the magical world he left behind wistfully has been left for “possibilities never imagined.”  Perhaps the journey into elderhood can also be hopeful, that leaving adulthood is as it should be, and that it is , per Dr. Thomas, a “complex ripening, a richness that is unavailable to those who remain in the fevered grip of adulthood.”

 


Ruta Kadonoff, Named Executive Director of The Pioneer Network

By / Posted on February 10th, 2016

We are thrilled to congratulate, Ruta Kadonoff, former Green House Project team member, on her new role as Executive Director of The Pioneer Network.  The Pioneer Network is an organization that was formed to support, advocate and enhance the work of individuals, organizations, regulators and policymakers who are creating a life-affirming, satisfying and meaningful culture of aging and long-term care.

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Ruta Kadonoff, Newly Appointed Executive Director of The Pioneer Network

“I am honored and excited by this opportunity to serve the Pioneer Network and advance its critically important work,” Kadonoff says in a press release. “I am passionate about seeing our vision and values fully realized and look forward to working hand in hand with innovators and individuals across the country who share this passion, who have come together in this unique gathering place for those of us unwilling to settle for the status quo.”

We look forward to opportunities to collaborate with Ruta and advance our shared vision and passion.

Read the announcement in Long Term Living>>


Portrait of a Green House Leader, Joyce Ebmeier

By / Posted on January 29th, 2016

What Does it Mean to Lead Meaningful and Sustainable Change

The “Portrait of a Green House Leader” webinar series continues by highlighting the talents of Joyce Ebmeier, Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning for Tabitha Health Care Services in Lincoln, NE. Tabitha offers a continuum of services to elders, including the first Green House homes in Nebraska and the second built nationally. Joyce attributes her desire to work in elder care to her deep relationship with her grandmother and the wisdom she shared with her growing up. After graduating from the University of Nebraska with a bachelor’s degree in Education, she pursued a career in teaching before beginning her career with Tabitha in 1981, where she served as the administrator of their nursing and rehabilitation center for fourteen years. Currently, as the Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning, she is responsible for directing the overall planning, monitoring, communication, and progress of Tabitha’s business and strategic plan.

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Joyce (right) with her mother

Joyce was inspired to champion the development of Tabitha’s four Green House homes after listening to Dr. Thomas speak about The Green House vision in 2001. As an administrator of a traditional facility, she knew the opportunity to imagine a blank page, and create more of what she knew elder care could be through The Green House model was the next step in writing Tabitha’s future chapters. After sharing the vision, the board approved the development of one Green House home after half the initial funds were raised. Joyce identifies that engaging with a grant writer to help locate available funding sources and network with organizational leaders was a crucial strategy to raise the initial funds for the Martin house, their first Green House home to nine elders. After they demonstrated the success of the model through the Martin house, three more homes were built, with plans to purchase property and build four additional homes in the future.

From a cost perspective, Joyce states that their Green House homes are major contributors to the success of the

Construction of a Green House home on Tabitha's campus

Construction of the Good House

entire company. Specifically, adding Green House homes for long term care into Tabitha’s continuum of services provided an opportunity to expand their capacity for post acute short term rehabilitation in their legacy building. This balance of costs and revenues combined aids in the growth of Tabitha’s entire organization. Further, Joyce describes that the quality of care associated with their Green House homes has become a hallmark within the community that is a “magnet” for people seeking long term care. This high demand results in a reliable, sustainable census that is crucial for overall operational success.

However, Joyce notes that the true success or “magic” of The Green House model comes from the incredible people who live and work in the homes and the culture created to foster deep knowing relationships. “It’s the most important part of getting The Green House model correct. If you don’t have the right people and you don’t provide an environment which empowers them to do their work with the elders… if that doesn’t happen the most beautiful and perfectly designed houses are really a waste of time and money.” At Tabitha, recruiting extremely creative, great people has resulted in

Annual Green House carnival

Annual Green House carnival

unique teams in each home where people feel empowered to bring who they are into their work. This results in extraordinary events and celebrations, such as their annual Green House carnival, and quiet everyday moments of compassion, love, and joy in the homes that couldn’t occur in a traditional setting. For Joyce, when talking about her accomplishments in her career, she identifies working with The Green House Project as the one she’s most proud of, yet is continuously striving for success in providing the highest quality of care for elders. When thinking about her Green House legacy in the future, she hopes it reads “But as remarkable as the Green House model became, what came next from these pioneers in elder care was even better.”

Listen to this recorded webinar interview>>


The White House Conference On Aging Releases a Final Report

By / Posted on January 13th, 2016

“In a year that marked the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security, the White House Conference on Aging provided an opportunity to reflect on the importance of these programs, highlight new actions to support Americans as we age, and focus on the powerful role that technology can play in lives of seniors in the decade ahead.”  –Cecilia Munoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council

WHCOA_picThe Green House Project was honored to participate and be highlighted during the 2015 White House Conference on Aging.  “Through a combination of listening sessions, breakout groups, watch parties, regional and topical forums, and written feedback, the White House heard from thousands of Americans about the issues most important to them regarding our aging population.”  Click here to read the final report for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging that summarizes the work of the White House to create a fulfilling and dignified world for elders and those who work closest to them.

One highlight was a visit by Executive Director of The White House Conference on Aging, Nora Super, to Leonard Florence Center for living, the first urban Green House model, located outside of Boston.  There, Ms. Super engaged in dialogue with elders and staff members to learn how The Green House model creates caring homes and meaningful lives for those who live and work there.  This opportunity gave the model a national stage to share the impact that it can have for elders and staff in long term care.

White House Conference on Aging Executive Director, Nora Super, pictured with Green House and Leonard Florence team members

White House Conference on Aging Executive Director, Nora Super, pictured with Green House and Leonard Florence team members