REGISTRATION for The Green House Educator Program: March 4-8, 2013

By / Posted on December 26th, 2012

THE GREEN HOUSE® Educator Program is a highly interactive workshop available exclusively to Green House Educators. The program will be held at The Eddy Village Green, an operating Green House organization in Albany, NY.

Purpose: To prepare effective Green House Educators to teach the various Green House curricula

Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the purpose and understand the content of The Green House education programs: The Green House Core Team Education, The Role of the Nurse, In-House Training (Lab Practicum), Culinary Training & ServSafe, EN-CORE/Peer Mentor Program
  • Understand the role of Green House Educators in implementing and sustaining the model
  • Describe The Green House values and essential practices through experiential learning in Green House homes
  • Describe how each curricula is designed to develop competencies for empowered self-managed work teams and coaching partners
  • Describe the likely characteristics of participants and explain how each curricula is designed to meet their learning needs and support effective team-building
  • Gather lessons-learned and successful teaching practices from experienced Green House Educators
  • Identify their own values related to their role as an educator/teacher/trainer
  • Identify their areas of strength and areas needing support in order to prepare and teach the Core Team Education curriculum effectively

There is no cost to Green House organizations to register. Some meals will be provided during the training, although other participants will be responsible for other expenses (ex. travel, hotel, remaining meals).

More logistics will be available upon registration (below). The deadline for registration is February 6, 2013.


REGISTRATION for Coaching Supervision: April 16-18, 2013

By / Posted on December 26th, 2012

THE GREEN HOUSE® Coaching Supervision Program is a highly interactive workshop available exclusively to Green House Guides and Directors of Nursing. The program will be held at The Green House Project office in Arlington, VA.

Purpose: To prepare Green House Guides and Directors of Nursing in their roles as coaching supervisors and partners to the self-managed work team.

Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the primary roles of a supervisor, the importance of supervision in long-term care, and the role of the Guide and the DON in The GHeen house model relative to supervision
  • Understand the principles and practices of a coaching-based approach to supervising and guiding individuals in self-managed work teams
  • Use coachining-based communication and problem-solving skills, especially active listening, maintaining appropriate emotional control, and presenting information objectively, without blame or judgment
  • Relate to employees and teams in a supportive manner, with empathy, while also offering clear feedback about expectations, problems, and their consequences
  • Help employees and teams to consider different perspectives and possibilites and help them actively make decisions to address problematic behaviors
  • Practice the skills of coaching superision in one-to-one interactions with teams
  • Explore how the role of the leader shifts as she or he adopts several leadership approaches that empoewr self-managed work teams
  • Address the impact of power and authority in a coaching relationship as it relates to individuals and self-managed teams

There is no cost to Green House organizations to register. Lunch will be provided during the training, although other participants will be responsible for other expenses (ex. travel, hotel, remaining meals).

More logistics will be available upon registration (below). The deadline for registration is  March 15, 2013. 

Fill out my online form.


REGISTRATION for Adult Learner-Centered Education: February 5-7, 2013

By / Posted on November 30th, 2012

THE GREEN HOUSE® Adult Learner-Centered Education Program is a highly interactive workshop available exclusively to Green House Educators. The program will be held at The Green House Project office in Arlington, VA on February 5-7, 2013.  The number of participants varies based on the needs of each organization; although, we strongly recommend at least two Green House Educators attend. Please see below to register and to learn more about this three-day program.

Purpose: To orient staff educators to the content and approach of the Coaching for Partnership curriculum

Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify their own values related to their role as a educator/teacher/trainer.
  • Describe key principles and practices for effective adult learning.
  • Explain how this curriculum is designed to apply the key principles of adult learning.
  • Describe how this curriculum is designed to develop Coaching competencies for Clinical Support Team Members.
  • Describe the likely characteristics of participants and explain how this curriculum is designed to meet their learning needs.
  • Demonstrate the adult learner-centered training approach by practice teaching activities from the Coaching for Partnership curriculum.
  • Identify their areas of strength and areas needing support in order to teach the model curriculum effectively.

There is no cost to Green House organizations to register. Lunch will be provided during the training, although other participants will be responsible for other expenses (ex. travel, hotel, remaining meals).

More logistics will be available upon registration (below). The deadline for registration is January 5, 2013.

Fill out my online form.


Sneak Peak: Green House 10th Anniversary Trailer– coming to a community near you 2013!

By / Posted on September 12th, 2012

Click here to view The Green House Project 10th Anniversary Trailer. Creating Real Home, Meaningful Lives and Empowered Staff– Coming to a Community Near You– 2013!!


Policy Event Launches National Conversation about Advancing the Green House Model

By / Posted on June 1st, 2012

On May 30, The Green House Project, in partnership with The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, hosted a groundbreaking policy event at the newly opened Green House Residences at Stadium Place. As the first Green House project in the state of Maryland, the proximity of Stadium Place afforded an opportunity for more than 70 national leaders in government, aging and long-term care to see the homes firsthand and launch a national conversation about how to make Green House homes a choice in every community.

With the support of Green House program experts, adopters, and researchers, the event served as an opportunity for education about the unique elements of the Green House model and the positive, evidence-based outcomes of the cultural and environmental transformation. Following a discussion of early results from emerging consumer research and a new pilot study on Medicare and Medicaid cost savings, Don Redfoot, Strategic Policy Advisor of AARP, noted that, “the Green House model demonstrates that you don’t have to have an institutional model to provide a high-level of care.”

Perhaps most inspiring was the testimonial of Ann Frohman, granddaughter of former Green House elder, Mary Valentine. Ann demonstrated how her grandmother “sprouted wings” while living in the Green House homes in Lincoln, NE. Through Anne’s reflections, the need was validated for continued collaboration and conversations about ways in which to impact elders nationwide through growth of the Green House movement.


Celebrating Mary Valentine: Green House Life through her Granddaughter’s Eyes

By / Posted on May 31st, 2012

Contribution by Ann Frohman, granddaughter of Mary Valentine

Mary Valentine was a tiny, elegant red-headed woman who surrounded herself with beauty.  She was a lady of fashion and style. She loved the opera, flowers, poetry, French Impressionist art, the warmth of a home surrounded by family and friends.  She was humble and appreciative of all life had given her, an eternal optimist, never sad or discouraged.  She made others at ease.  She was the nicest person I have ever known.

Mary, a register nurse, was married to Lyn Valentine, a medical doctor. He preceded her in death by some thirty years. After his death Mary worked at a nursing home.  Fiercely independent, she worked until she was seventy years old. By the time she entered a nursing home in her mid 90’s, she was well aware of what was in store.

When Mary entered the nursing home she was partially blind and very hard of hearing. Yet, her fragile body denied her age as she would speed around the halls and outside with a red walker leading the way.  She was social. Her mind and spirit were sharp and she enjoyed people.  Still, the nursing home was not where she wanted to be.

One time on a visit, Mary was sitting on her bed doing leg lifts.  At 97 years old, I asked why the effort?  She said she needed to keep her strength up to walk. This made sense as she had experienced several falls while there.  Surprisingly, she confided that she intended to get out of the nursing home and she knew she wouldn’t if she was unable to walk. 

As days went by, we watched the light that had shined so brightly all her life began to dim. She quit her leg lifts.  She spent much of her time sleeping because there was nowhere to go.  Fewer friends visited.  My daughter played violin in the hallway as there was no place in her room.  There was no piano for my other daughter. We were always in the hallway. Finally, I couldn’t take it.  I complained to management, not about her care, which was good, but about the facility design and nonsense rules.

I later learned that my complaint was a watershed moment.  The nursing home wanted to do more and be more.  When Mary was 98 years of age, she did in fact walk out of the nursing home- she moved across the street into the Green House.

Mary Valentine celebrating her 100th birthday

It was amazing how suddenly, her life mattered again.  Mary picked out colors to paint her room. She selected furniture and was excited to have a small table with two chairs, lace table cloth, a tea set and photo album and pictures displayed. The French Impressionist art returned.  She had her own closet and wanted nice clothes. After all, she planned for visitors who came from all over the country not just locally.  She really enjoyed sleeping in and still having breakfast, sitting by the fireplace and having meals at a large, beautiful table while chatting with the shahbazim. We visited often and strolled through the neighborhood.  My mother brought her dog all the time.  My daughter played violin for all. We spent Christmas day there two years in a row with violin, serving prime rib (from a blender) and laughter. It was magical. Mary smiled, and laughed.  She bragged on the violinist.

Our family got to know Thomas and Monica, her shahbazim. My grandmother told me she felt bad that Thomas’s dog always fancied her over the others. (Thomas thought that was odd as yes the dog loved her but he said Mary wouldn’t ever let the dog leave her lap!)  Monica once took a dress home to iron so that Mary would not be wrinkled. Every night she donned a soft floral gown and was tucked into bed. The year of 2006 belonged to Mary. Mary celebrated her 100th birthday with a margarita and cigarette on the porch of the home with family and friends.  My mother too connected with the Green House, the shahbazim, and the elders in a deeply almost spiritual way.  When Mary passed on, we grieved with the elders and shahbazim. 

We continued to visit the Green House until all the elders we knew passed on. My mother was attached to this home.  There was a memorial event in honor of Mary the next year with a statue in the garden at that Green House bearing a likeness of my mother’s dog.  The Green House enabled Mary to live some of the happiest days of her life. These also some of the happiest days of my life and that of my mother, as we knew that Grandmother was cared for — deeply cared for.

Special thanks to Ann Frohman and her family for continuing to keep Mary’s light shining bright!


Clinical Support Spotlight: April is Occupational Therapy Month

By / Posted on March 28th, 2012

What do National Peach Cobbler Day, Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, and Occupational Therapy (OT) Month have in common? If you guessed that they’re all celebrated in April- you’ve got it! While delicious cobbler and our former president are by no means insignificant, The Green House® Project is particularly eager to acknowledge the OT profession and the dozens of clinical support team members that support growth and meaningful lives for Green House elders each day of the year.

In What Are Old People For?, Dr. Bill Thomas identifies habilitation as “the effort to bring forth existing but latent potential within a person or group of people. It is distinguished from rehabilitation– a term that presumes a defect to be rectified or a brokenness that must be prepared.” Similarly, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) defines the OT profession as one which “helps people engage in living life to its fullest.”  With parallel efforts to reframe society’s declinist perspective on aging, it isn’t surprising that many Occupational Therapy practitioners are drawn to the holistic, person-centered approach supported by the Green House model.

Andrea Tyck began her career as an OT Assistant and is currently the Wellness Director and future Green House Guide at Mt. San Antonio Gardens in Pomona, CA. “Amidst the loss that elders face, our role is to help people move forward- to see beyond loss and support continued growth,” says Andrea.

Andrea Tyck began her career as an OT Assistant and will be the future Green House Guide at Mt. San Antonio Gardens

 

Just as Eden Principle #6 recognizes that “meaningless activity corrodes the human spirit”, Occupational Therapy is designed to support activities that are meaningful and purposeful for each individual. “Occupational Therapy is not just about enhancing function,” explains Andrea, “but it is supporting development for a larger purpose. In deeply knowing individual interests and rhythms of the day, OT interventions are more effective at meeting personal goals.”

While long corridors, tight schedules, and departmental silos can serve as barriers in traditional long-term care “facilities”, the Green House model is designed to support individual growth in an environment that is more than homelike– it is home. Opportunities for purposeful activities abound in a small environment that supports intentional community and meaningful engagement. What better reason to maintain or regain abilities at mealtime than the smell of a home-cooked meal and an opportunity to share convivium with your friends and family? This month, be sure to set an extra place at the table and show appreciation for the role of Occupational Therapy practitioners as care partners, mentors, and cheerleaders for elders, staff, and families. (You might as well celebrate with peach cobbler for dessert, while you’re at it!)

For more information, visit the American Occupational Therapy Association


Woodland Park, Virginia's First Green House Homes, Break Ground in Harrisonburg

By / Posted on January 30th, 2012

 

VMRC Groundbreaking

The imagery was especially powerful at the January 5 Groundbreaking at Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community (VMRC) in Harrisonburg for the first three of 10 homes for Woodland Park.

The Groundbreaking Ceremony included various displays of resident-centered philosophy. Two residents of VMRC’s current long-term care community lifted soil with shovels which were decorated by residents. Residents baked cookies for the reception following the event. And residents assembled commemorative pouches of soil from the site with packets of wildflower seeds which were given to all attendees.

VMRC President and CEO Ronald Yoder summarized the significance of building Woodland Park:

“VMRC’s vision to pursue this project … is rooted in our desire and commitment to respond to the deep yearnings of elders, their children, nieces, nephews and siblings to offer a different choice for long-term care – one that enables elders to continue their normal patterns of daily living and one that responds to the desires and expectations of family members and caregivers.”

And before inviting persons to the site for the Groundbreaking, Ron added, “The small action with a shovel represents a shift from people viewing long-term care as an undesirable destination to a place to continue living and enjoying life as they wish.”

The theme of building a foundation was carried throughout the ceremony. Especially reinforced when attendees were asked to place small stones they had been given into the walls of a 4×4 model of a Woodland Park home. Residents, caregivers, spouses, employees, and donors participated in this part of the program.

Visit VMRC’s photo album on Facebook and at www.vmrcharrisonburg.

Blog Post Contributed by Maureen  Pearson, Director of Communications, VMRC


Woodland Park, Virginia’s First Green House Homes, Break Ground in Harrisonburg

By / Posted on January 30th, 2012

 

VMRC Groundbreaking

The imagery was especially powerful at the January 5 Groundbreaking at Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community (VMRC) in Harrisonburg for the first three of 10 homes for Woodland Park.

The Groundbreaking Ceremony included various displays of resident-centered philosophy. Two residents of VMRC’s current long-term care community lifted soil with shovels which were decorated by residents. Residents baked cookies for the reception following the event. And residents assembled commemorative pouches of soil from the site with packets of wildflower seeds which were given to all attendees.

VMRC President and CEO Ronald Yoder summarized the significance of building Woodland Park:

“VMRC’s vision to pursue this project … is rooted in our desire and commitment to respond to the deep yearnings of elders, their children, nieces, nephews and siblings to offer a different choice for long-term care – one that enables elders to continue their normal patterns of daily living and one that responds to the desires and expectations of family members and caregivers.”

And before inviting persons to the site for the Groundbreaking, Ron added, “The small action with a shovel represents a shift from people viewing long-term care as an undesirable destination to a place to continue living and enjoying life as they wish.”

The theme of building a foundation was carried throughout the ceremony. Especially reinforced when attendees were asked to place small stones they had been given into the walls of a 4×4 model of a Woodland Park home. Residents, caregivers, spouses, employees, and donors participated in this part of the program.

Visit VMRC’s photo album on Facebook and at www.vmrcharrisonburg.

Blog Post Contributed by Maureen  Pearson, Director of Communications, VMRC


Community Partnership Key To Maryland's First Green House Project, Baltimore Sun Reports

By / Posted on January 18th, 2012

In light of the final stretch of construction for The Green House® Residences at Stadium Place, The Baltimore Sun recently posted an article highlighting the unique community partnership that has contributed to the success of the first Green House homes in Maryland. Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation (GEDCO) and Catholic Charities have created a strengths-based collaboration to achieve their shared vision to create better lives for Elders receiving skilled nursing care in Baltimore. In an interview with GEDCO Executive Director, Mitchell Posner, he explained the significance of each organization in the partnership:

“GEDCO operates its other housing complexes, including the Venable and Ednor apartment buildings at Stadium Place, on the site of the old Memorial Stadium. But, since the Green House will require skilled nursing care, GEDCO is handing the management reins over to Catholic Charities, which has experience in that part of the health care industry.”

The collaboration has amplified the community involvement in and commitment to the project, as the Stadium Place team has demonstrated the importance of all perspectives, resources, and experiences. Nate Sweeney, Green House Guide at Stadium Place, acknowledged that the homes will ensure that each elder “has a place at the table”. Similarly, GEDCO and Catholic Charities have modeled this value by bringing complementary strengths to table in preparation for the homes to open in April 2012.


Community Partnership Key To Maryland’s First Green House Project, Baltimore Sun Reports

By / Posted on January 18th, 2012

In light of the final stretch of construction for The Green House® Residences at Stadium Place, The Baltimore Sun recently posted an article highlighting the unique community partnership that has contributed to the success of the first Green House homes in Maryland. Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation (GEDCO) and Catholic Charities have created a strengths-based collaboration to achieve their shared vision to create better lives for Elders receiving skilled nursing care in Baltimore. In an interview with GEDCO Executive Director, Mitchell Posner, he explained the significance of each organization in the partnership:

“GEDCO operates its other housing complexes, including the Venable and Ednor apartment buildings at Stadium Place, on the site of the old Memorial Stadium. But, since the Green House will require skilled nursing care, GEDCO is handing the management reins over to Catholic Charities, which has experience in that part of the health care industry.”

The collaboration has amplified the community involvement in and commitment to the project, as the Stadium Place team has demonstrated the importance of all perspectives, resources, and experiences. Nate Sweeney, Green House Guide at Stadium Place, acknowledged that the homes will ensure that each elder “has a place at the table”. Similarly, GEDCO and Catholic Charities have modeled this value by bringing complementary strengths to table in preparation for the homes to open in April 2012.