Green House Featured as Innovator at National LeadingAge Conference

By / Posted on October 20th, 2017

To care well for others, we need to reinforce our own passion for what we do—and actively work to improve how to support our country’s aging population today. That’s exactly what we do at the LeadingAge Annual Meeting & EXPO, our nation’s largest annual event for the not-for-profit aging services field. In education sessions, during general sessions and through eye-opening, one-of-a-kind experiences, you and your team will be immersed in our shared mission of helping older adults thrive.”

The Green House Project is looking forward to opportunities to connect with visionary organizations at this of this event.  Please visit us in the exhibit hall at booth #1913.  Also, don’t miss this informative, challenging and stimulating sessions that feature Green House expertise and innovation:

Monday, October 30, 2017

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

22-C. Integrated vs. Segregated Environments for Persons With Dementia

  • Examine the pros and cons of integrating versus separating elders living with dementia in different settings.
  • Consider how the approach to dementia care and programming has evolved as the physical environment of memory care “units” continues to change from locked wings to neighborhoods.
  • Assess your organization’s philosophy and care practices as they relate to those living with dementia and their care partners.

Speakers:

  • Audrey Weiner, President & CEO, The New Jewish Home, New York, NY
  • Ann Wyatt, Manager, Palliative & Residential Care, CaringKind, New York, NY
  • Susan Ryan, Senior Director, Green House Project, Linthicum, MD
  • Tammy Marshall, Chief Experience Officer, The New Jewish Home, New York, NY
  • J. David Hoglund, Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman, Pittsburgh, PA

 Tuesday, October 31, 2017

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

48-F. From Traditional Skilled Nursing to Green House® Model

  • Discover how resident leadership, administration and board members achieved consensus to transition toward a new model of care.
  • Understand how the new financial model created a platform for new funding opportunities and revenue streams.
  • Consider planning, forecasting, marketing and implementation pitfalls to avoid from both a financial and care perspective.

Speakers:

  • Gerald Stryker, President/CEO, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Rob Seitz, Marketing & Communications Manager, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Jean Eccleston, CFO, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • David Haun, Resident, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Twylah Haun, Resident, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Nanette Olson, Executive Director of the Foundation, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Monica McAfee, Director of Sales and Marketing, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL


Leading with the New CMS Regulations: It’s in the Green House DNA!

By / Posted on October 17th, 2017

Many traditional nursing homes are scrambling to meet the new person-centered regulatory standards; however, it is business as usual for Green House homes.  What set’s Green House homes apart is the comprehensive transformation of the homes… physical design, organizational structure and philosophy of care are all changed to reflect elder-directed care. The three Core Values: Real Home, Empowered Staff & Meaningful life provide a guidepost for establishing operational practices.

CMS is placing a larger focus on use of non-pharmalogical interventions and staff having appropriate competencies and skills. Appropriate treatment and services for Elders living with dementia is also emphasized in the new regulations.

A key element of The Green House model is the use of specially trained versatile workers, whose responsibilities include food preparation and service, activities, light housekeeping, and laundry. The versatile workers are called Shahbaz, and are Certified Nursing Assistants who receive an additional 128 hours of education which encompasses all elements of their work including infection control procedures, culinary skills, dementia, communication skills and activities. Not only are staffed provided the training they need, but consistent staffing allows for Shahbazim to get to know their Elders, establish strong bonds of friendship. Being well-known supports allows for non-pharmalogical interventions to be effective.

 Residents Rights has become the largest section in the new CMS regulations.

Shahbazim understand that one of their fundamental roles is to nurture, sustain and protect the Elders in their care. Elders are in control, driving decisions in the home from menu choices to daily activities. Staff learn about how to provide Meaningful Life to elders in their care, including honoring their natural rhythms. Elders can sleep in and go to bed when they wish.

New regulations set new standards for care planning.

Elders can decide who attends and now must participate in setting goals. A nurse aide and a member of food services staff are required to attend care plan meetings. Again, this has always been part of the Green House model. Shahbazim lead the care plan meetings. Because they are consistently assigned to work in one home, they know their Elders well. Staff are coached on how to respect Elder’s wishes, while informing them of risks and benefits of proposed care. Ultimately, the Elder decides.

Grievances must be acted on quickly by staff and recommendations from Elders must now be considered. In a Green House home staff are talking to Elders daily, hearing their concerns and following up on their issues in “real time.”

Shahbazim are empowered and therefore can often make immediate changes to address Elder’s concerns, eliminating the need to go through a long chain of command to have issues heard and changes made.

CMS has put more emphasis on creating a “homelike” environment.

Green House takes it to another level providing “real home.” Every elder has a private bathroom and their own bathroom/shower. Elders can personalize their bedrooms, bringing in many items from home.

Meaningful Engagement is now a greater focus of new regulations.

Elders must be provided with a choice of activities that encourage both independence and interaction with the community. Activities in a Green House home include a combination of planned and spontaneous events, with a majority of activity occurring naturally and recorded as appropriate. Although the full-time activities director will act in a facilitative role, providing assessment and evaluation of activity preferences and individual engagement, assistance with activity programming, coaching and teaching; versatile workers within each home will have primary responsibility for leading meaningful and engaging activities on a daily basis. While anticipated activities can be scheduled, the spontaneity fostered in a Green House home means not all activities can be planned.  Some programs will occur naturally, such as folding laundry, a family visit, or assisting with the day’s meal.

The Green House team is proud of the work of our adopters and the strides we have made to lead the field, creating better lives and better jobs.  


Jewish Senior Life Celebrates the Opening of Nine Green House Cottages in Rochester, New York

By / Posted on September 29th, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ROCHESTER, N.Y.—September 25, 2017Jewish Senior Life  today announced the opening of nine new long-term care homes on its campus, a key milestone in its ongoing $83 million campus transformation project. The organization has invited residents, their families, community leaders and the media to attend the opening celebration of these new homes, which represent a model of care unmatched by any other senior care provider in the area.

“We’re setting an example of what the future of care can and should look like for our elders,” said Mike King, President and CEO of Jewish Senior Life. “We’ve adopted this new model of care so that we can serve the community better than ever before, providing high satisfaction for our staff and an even higher quality of life for residents, as well as peace of mind for their families. Our values of honoring our mothers and fathers are woven into the fabric of our culture of Jewish Senior Life.”

Susan Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project

The opening celebration commemorates the completion of nine new long-term care homes, housed in three modern three-story buildings. These buildings, called Green House Cottages, were built in conjunction with The Green House Project, a nationally- accredited organization representing a new standard in long-term care. There are over 200 Green House communities open in the country right now, with another 100 being built. The Jewish Home will be the 3rd largest Green House community in the country.

Key features and benefits include:

Home environment: Each floor in the three new Green House Cottages is its own home, complete with a kitchen, common areas, and private suite rooms with There are three homes in each of the three Cottages, for a total of nine new homes that house 12 residents in each home.

Access to secure outdoor spaces: All three Green House Cottages have courtyards and walkways that contribute to a real sense of home and

Self-managed care teams: Specially-trained certified nursing assistants (CNAs), each one called an “Adir,” staff each home and provide a wide range of assistance, including personal care, activities, and meal preparation, as well as light housekeeping and laundry. Each home also has a nurse on duty as well as a clinical support team.

In the new Green House Cottage homes, caregivers are able to personalize their approach to best meet the unique individual needs of each resident, resulting in more meaningful lives and relationships. By enhancing their living environment and delivering a more personalized care experience, residents will now have even more choice, autonomy and control.

The opening of the Green House Cottages represents a major milestone in the total campus transformation project timeline.

 

Several additional updates are slated to be complete by Spring 2019:

  • Renovation of the existing Jewish Home tower to incorporate the home model, featuring private rooms and bathrooms for all long-term care residents;
  • Expansion of The Jewish Home of Rochester’s Transitional Care program (short-term rehabilitation) to better serve its hospital All transitional care rooms will be private rooms inside The Jewish Home. Transitional Care at The Jewish Home will be one of the largest post-acute care providers in Monroe County.

“Each part of the transformation you see here on our campus is made possible by our generous donors,” said Joel Weiss, Senior Vice President of Advancement, Jewish Senior Life Foundation. “Their support and vision ensures that we’re able to remain at the forefront of innovative person-centered care, making meaningful life a priority for years to come.”

About Jewish Senior Life:

Serving people of all faiths and ethnic backgrounds, Jewish Senior Life is guided by the values of honoring family and emphasizing aging in place—allowing people to remain in the place of their choice longer. Jewish Senior Life is a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC), offering all levels of care from independent living to skilled nursing care on a single campus:

  • The Summit at Brighton for independent living;
  • Wolk Manor for assisted living;
  • The Lodge at Wolk Manor for assisted living memory care;
  • The Jewish Home of Rochester for long-term, transitional, and memory care;
  • Transitional Care at the Jewish Home for short-term rehabilitation;
  • Atkin Center for Outpatient Rehabilitation;
  • Marian’s House daytime retreat for those with memory loss;
  • A variety of community programs and services such as Living Well Companion Care and Physician House Calls that enable people to age and live safely, either on campus or another place that they call

Jewish Senior Life is the only senior care provider in the Rochester area to offer Life Care, a program which eliminates worries about unforeseen care needs and medical expenses throughout the full continuum of care.

Jewish Senior Life is accredited for its high quality and customer satisfaction by CARF, and earned five out of five stars in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Five-Star Quality Rating. This designation is reserved for only the top ten percent of nursing home providers nationwide.

Jewish Senior Life has been named a 2017 Top Workplace by the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.

Jewish Senior Life is a member of the Alliance for Senior Care of Greater Rochester, Leading Age, Leading Age New York, and the Association of Jewish Agency Services.

For more information, please visit www.jewishseniorlife.org.


Nursing home tragedy demands a revolution in care | Opinion

By / Posted on September 25th, 2017

Nursing home tragedy demands a revolution in care | Opinion

by, Michael Anderson and Kennedy McGowan

Reposted from Sun Sentinal, 9/22/17

BOLD Justice, an interfaith group of 20 congregations, has been hearing tragic stories of abuse and neglect in long-term care facilities for years. We write representing those congregations and the work we are doing to actively fight for a new type of skilled nursing care in Broward County.

The eight tragic deaths at the Hollywood Hills skilled nursing facility, followed by three subsequent deaths, must serve as an urgent wake-up call.

If it hasn’t been obvious to anyone who ever visited a “traditional” nursing care home, we need change. We know there is a criminal investigation into the causes of this tragedy. No matter what that investigation shows, let’s be clear — this was a system-wide failure. It would be naive to believe that this problem and the solution to it are isolated to one nursing home.

BOLD Justice has researched and found a philosophy of person-centered care being practiced around the country. One example is the Green House Model, which features pleasant home-style environments and resident-directed care. Most impressive to us were the scientific studies showing improved health and wellbeing of elders in Green Houses, as well as higher rates of satisfaction among staff and families.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/opinion/commentary/fl-op-viewpoint-bold-justice-nursing-home-deaths-20170922-story.html


John Knox Village Weathered Hurricane Irma with Strength and Grace

By / Posted on September 19th, 2017

Spirits remained high before, during and after Hurricane Irma struck the city of Pompano Beach, FL in general and The Woodlands at John Knox Village in particular.

Located in the city of Pompano Beach, Florida’s first GREEN HOUSE® Project served a total of 246 guests (residents/elders) with residents transferring from Assisted Living, along with several Independent Living residents.

Additionally, 31 spouses of residents joined their loved ones along with 24 family members and children who were also together for the storm.

Scott Pfeifer, of RDG Architects comments, “As architects, we are trained in designing environments that focus on the health, safety and welfare of the building occupants as well as the community at large.  It is fulfilling for us at RDG Planning & Design to know that we have created a building for the elders and staff at John Knox Village that support The Green House philosophy while keeping everyone safe during Hurricane Irma.  The building became a safe haven for the community, and is a testament to the collaborative efforts in planning which involved owners, architects, interior designers, engineers, construction managers,The Green House Project and Florida AHCA“.

Elders in the Woodlands were served by 97 staff/team members which included CNA’s, Shahbazim, Nurses, Housekeepers, Managers, Dining Service Staff and Floor Technicians. The total number of people in the building through the storm was 343. Nobody was turned away.

The JKV team was united in its focus on elders’ safety, so in advance of the storm staff meetings took place based on the JKV Hurricane Manual (2017) following the Emergency Management Plan Manual.

Staff Hurricane Meetings were held twice a day as the storm was approaching. The plan was executed based on:
72 Hour – Hurricane Alert
48 Hour – Hurricane Watch
36 Hour Hurricane Watch
24 Hour – Hurricane Warning

Best Practices Steps Taken Included:
• Double checking hurricane food, water supplies and medications
• Deploying Hurricane Nursing Medical Supplies
• Topping off diesel generators
• Setting up rented cots for Villa Residents and Staff
• Assigning Director or Leadership Team Members as Building Supervisors
Deploying Two-Way Radios
• Continuing Communications during and post-storm with regular meetings
• Once Power was lost, generators automatically turned on for emergency power
• Once Power was lost in Health Care Settings, temperatures were monitored and hydration rounds were consistently done.


A Unique Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Development of Three Green House Homes in Missouri

By / Posted on August 7th, 2017

In the spirit of honoring the past, officials from the West Vue Nursing Home broke ground for their new Green House homes the same way it happened over half a century ago–with mules and a plow!

August 3, 2017 was a bright and sunny day to officially launch the construction of three 10-bedroom Green House homes.  In fact construction equipment was ready to begin their work once the event had concluded!

Located in West Plains, Missouri, the West Vue Nursing Home has been dedicated to providing care to elders in their rural community since the mid 1960’s and has earned a stellar reputation in the area.

In addition to Green House staff on hand for the event, GHN Architects and Engineers President Brad Baker expressed his eagerness to be part of the the project and his deep support for the Green House model, and his hope that more will be built.

 

The decision to build the homes was made with careful thought and consideration by the board of directors and leadership at West Vue.  President and CEO, Jalynn Meidell said that when she heard about the model, she knew she wanted West Vue to be part of it.

The homes are slated to open later next year. Congratulations to all involved in the development of this project!


Authenticity, Why it Matters

By / Posted on August 1st, 2017

Anne Ellett is a certified Nurse Practitioner (NP) with more than 20 years of experience in elder living and memory care, and served as Sr. Vice President with Silverado Senior Living, an award-winning Assisted Living company specializing in dementia care.  Currently, Anne is owner/CEO of Memory Care Support, LLC, a consulting agency working with senior housing professionals as they develop state-of-the-art health and wellness and memory care programs.

In Green House homes, authenticity matters – for example, we strive to build real homes, not fake homes, not pretend homes, not places that look like a home but really feel more like an institution.  We want to create that sense of belonging, of warmth and deep knowing that we all crave.  We want the elders to feel connected to the people and the space.

Best Life supports elders living with dementia (ELWD), and here too, we strive for authenticity.  For many ELWD, their experience has been one of loss and lack of choice.  Family, friends, and professionals may respond to their diagnosis rather than to the individual person, focusing on inabilities rather than retained talents and abilities.  The opportunities for real, authentic life experiences may be taken away, justified by saying, “It doesn’t really matter, they won’t know the difference.”

Best Life understands that being authentic does make a difference to elders and those working closest to them.  We know that real friendships, real relationships are meaningful.  One of the Best Life core principles is “Elder-directed, relationship-rich living.”  Offering opportunities for ELWD to sustain old relationships as well as the opportunity to form new ones is part of a normal life, and should be part of living with dementia.

Relationships with pets can also be important for ELWD.  How many of us enjoy the companionship of our pet cat or dog?  The joy that a dog brings when he puts his head in your lap, or a kitten who runs through the house chasing a ball of paper brings a lot of smiles.  An ELWD who can assist with feeding or walking the dog, or enjoys rubbing the neck of their favorite cat knows the significance of rapport with live animal.

As I visit many care locations, I am sometimes shown a community’s “pretend” pet animal program.  There are many varieties available of these fake pets, all of them claiming to bring joy to the elder.

Best Life focuses on real relationships built on retained abilities. If an ELWD is offered a robotic pet, they may respond and stroke it, but there’s no relationship, no purpose, no bond of love that is formed.

What would be the reason for not having a real pet – a loving dog or a real cat who can be the “diva” of the home?  Do we offer a robotic pet because again, we think, “It doesn’t really matter, they won’t know the difference?”  The magic that happens between an ELWD and a real pet cannot be substituted by offering a mechanical toy.

I’m reminded of one woman I knew who had recently moved into a home and was quickly labeled as a “challenge” by the care team.  Joan yelled out frequently, disrupting other elders.  She criticized both staff and elders and refused to participate when invited to meals or engagements.

As an annual event, the home sponsored a pet adoption day by the local animal shelter.  In preparation, the ELWD helped clear the patio where the public would be coming to view the adoptable pets. On the day of event, many volunteers with a variety of dogs and cats showed up at the home and as the volunteers and pets arrived, the elders greeted each one and welcomed them to their home for the pet adoption.

Joan initially resisted becoming involved, but as the dogs arrived, she focused on one small dog who was blind in one eye and was anxiously barking a lot.  As she pet the dog, it seemed to relax and finally laid down and closed its eyes.  Joan said, “It just needed some love,” and continued to sit by its side for the entire afternoon.

At the end of the day, the dog had not been adopted and the care team asked Joan if she would like to adopt it?  The look on Joan’s face said it all.  The significance of the friendship between Joan and her dog Freddy (Joan’s chosen name for it) was evident as the months passed.  It seemed Joan found purpose and peace when she and Freddy would sit together or as she fed it some of her favorite chicken dish that she had saved from her own dinner plate.

Best Life encourages an authentic, real home where an ELWD has opportunities for a life that is purposeful and relationship-rich. learn more>>

 

 

 

 


Green House Highlighted at 2017 Pioneer Network Conference

By / Posted on July 27th, 2017

Next week, visionary leaders will come together at the 2017 Pioneer Network Conference.  The theme, ‘Be The Future’, is a powerful charge to change the way society views aging, and create a better world for elders and those who work closest to them.  The goal of this conference is to showcase innovative thought and best practices in the long-term care culture change movement.  The Green House model is featured throughout the conference, and the national initiative is leading two sessions, one on the value of short term rehabilitation with a Green House home, and one on Best Life for elders living with dementia.

Short term rehabilitation presents an opportunity to position an organization for the future. The small house model provides a consumer-driven experience that leads to positive outcomes.  During the education session, The Green House Project will highlight The Woodlands of John Knox Village, an organization who has captured their market by utilizing The Green House model for short term rehabilitation.  They will share how they achieve positive outcomes using functional rehabilitation in the home, establish credibility with key stakeholders, and positively impact their bottom line.

As the population of the United States ages, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s and related dementia is growing. Dementia was estimated to cost the United States more than $236 billion in 2016.  To address this challenge, The Green House Project has developed Best Life, an initiative that aims to connect elders with life and community through the philosophical, architectural, and organizational elements of The Green House model. It requires dedicated teams, extensive knowledge of the types of dementia, and a fervent belief in the unique ability of every individual to enjoy a meaningful life.

The Green House Project is a proud leader of what is possible in long term care.  This conference is a time to connect with like-minded visionaries.  As the paradigm shifts to view elders as creative, resourceful and whole, their potential is unlocked, and we all benefit.

Learn more about The Pioneer Network>>


Green House homes in Florida are Supporting Elders to Live their Best Life

By / Posted on June 26th, 2017

Anne Ellett is a certified Nurse Practitioner (NP) with more than 20 years of experience in elder living and memory care, and served as Sr. Vice President with Silverado Senior Living, an award-winning Assisted Living company specializing in dementia care.  Currently, Anne is owner/CEO of Memory Care Support, LLC, a consulting agency working with senior housing professionals as they develop state-of-the-art health and wellness and memory care programs.

The Green House Project recognizes that providing a life affirming, dignified environment for elders living with dementia (ELWD) is imperative, especially given that over 80% of people living in long term care have some form of cognitive change.   Supporting these elders to thrive is a multifaceted process, and involves culture change.  Best Life is a new initiative, designed to support Green House teams, by building on the core values of Real Home, Meaningful Life and Empowered Staff, and providing enhanced education that focus on principles such as:

  • Power of Normal – normalizing programs and environments
  • Integration with greater community
  • Celebrating retained abilities
  • Dignity of Risk
  • Age-appropriate interactions
  • Elder-directed, relationship-rich living
  • Advocacy

 I had the pleasure of delivering this guided process of implementation at The Woodlands at John Knox Village (JKV) in Pompano Beach, Fl.  JKV is a wonderful location incorporating independent living, assisted living, a nursing community and 12 Green House homes onto one campus!  Their 12 homes have barely been open a few months but the leadership at JKV has the desire to strive for excellence in helping those with dementia thrive.  Educator, Dolores Hughes said, “We feel equipped with tools to implement immediately, and also challenged to see people living with dementia in a new way. Best Life is an eye-opening experience.”

BEST LIFE supports elders living with dementia (ELWD) to have choice and dignity, while living in the least restrictive environment possible.  Often, restrictions are due to our own perceptions of the capabilities and interests of ELWD.  Typically, we are trained to see the diagnosis first rather than the whole person, which can limit the experiences and choices we offer to the ELWD.  For example, as a nurse, I was trained to label “patients” by their diagnosis, i.e., the hip fracture in Room ###, or the patient with Alzheimer’s in Room ##.

When we use labels to identify someone, that prevents us from seeing the whole person and instead we focus on their loss of abilities,   “they’re not able to ______ (fill in the blank) because they are living with dementia, they would not be interested in doing ______ (fill in the blank) because they are living with dementia.”  In BEST LIFE, we learn to look beyond losses and inabilities toward retained capabilities and emerging talents.

As professionals, it’s important to examine our own training in the traditional model which emphasizes the diagnosis rather than the person.  Are we limiting the experiences we offer to ELWD?  For example, are we restricting them, perhaps from our own bias and belief that we need to segregate ELWD for their own safety?  New research shows that there is value in offering ELWD frequent experiences with the larger community and with younger generations.

BEST LIFE has three areas of focus: Culture, Meaningful Engagements, and Health and Well-being.  An entire day is devoted to each of these topics, looking both at our own biases and misperceptions of ELWD, and also examining new research from around the globe on new techniques that are beneficial and increase choice and dignity for ELWD.

During the BEST LIFE workshop at JKV, one of the most poignant experiences was when the participants shared what they would want the shahbazim to know about them if they were living with dementia.  Aside from details such as their favorite foods or activities, the participants overwhelmingly requested that they be enabled to continue to have fun and laughter, and opportunities to try new things, and also to continue to contribute and “give back”.

There are already stories of elders connecting with life in new ways, as a result of this new focus on retained abilities and strengths. There is an elder in The Woodlands who plays dominoes every day after lunch and loves to teach anyone else, and an individual who recovering in short term rehab and plays his harmonica.  Knowing him is a priority,  and his full personality shines!    There is a new garden growing in another one of the homes—it is amazing how nature, growth and learning enhances well-being for everyone.

 

 

 


GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

By / Posted on June 6th, 2017

 

 

For more information, contact:  Susan Ryan
sryan@thegreenhouseproject.org or 703.615.2359

 

 

GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

BALTIMORE, MDThe Green House® Project has received a two-year, $650,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to fulfill its mission of redefining—and humanizing—long-term care in the United States.

The Green House Project aims to end the institutionalization of older adults in America. Under this vision, all elders will have the opportunity to live in small, welcoming homes with dignity, autonomy, choice, and the best quality of life possible, while receiving the care they need.

The new RWJF grant will enable Green House Project leaders at the nonprofit Center for Innovation, which recently acquired the Green House trademark and intellectual property, to continue spearheading this movement. They will work with the leading Green House adopters to further refine the model while spreading it across the country.

Additionally, the national initiative plans to expand the impact of the Green House model through a specialized focus on people living with dementia, people in need of short-term rehabilitation services, and other areas of innovation. The Green House Project, the pioneer of the small house model, offers proven clinical and financial outcomes through a comprehensive cultural transformation across the entire organizational system.

“The Green House Project is a dynamic model that continues to evolve as an agile leader in the field,” said Scott Townsley, president of the Center for Innovation. “The success of the Green House Project has catalyzed a community of thought leaders who are discovering new ways to improve the lives of elders. We’re excited to work in partnership with them to change the way people age.”

The Center for Innovation, where the Green House Project is based, was founded by three members of the faculty at The Erickson School, University of Maryland Baltimore County. The Erickson School is the only program in the country offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees in the management of aging services.

The Green House Project launched more than a dozen years ago with the shared vision of its founder, William Thomas, M.D., and RWJF, for transforming long-term care. Today, 231 Green House homes are open and operating, serving elders in 32 states across the country, and another 150 are in the works.

“We owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Thomas for his role in helping to get the Green House Project to where it is today,” said Susan Ryan, senior director of The Green House Project.  “We wish him well in his future endeavors to move the field forward.”

The Green House Project has a solid evidence base. Supported by RWJF, the THRIVE Research Collaborative conducted a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the Green House model.  A team of leading health care and long-term researchers conducted a half-dozen studies that addressed workforce issues, quality of care, cost savings, and culture change.  These studies, all published in the journal Health Services Research, found that:

  • Elders in Green House homes were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, to be bedridden, to need catheters, or to have pressure sores than those in non-Green House homes.
  • Annual inpatient and skilled nursing facility Medicare costs were significantly lower for elders in Green House homes.
  • Caregiving staff in Green House homes spent more time per day with elders than caregiving staff in non-Green House homes.

“The Green House Project is what people want—for themselves and for their loved ones,” said Nancy Barrand, senior adviser for program development at RWJF.  “We want to ensure that every community has a Green House home and that the Green House Project becomes the standard of quality for all nursing care.”

 To learn more about The Green House Project, visit:  thegreenhouseproject.org

 

 

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Green House Model Fidelity Tool Ensures Sustainability

By / Posted on June 2nd, 2017

The Green House (GH) model is a valuable investment of time and resources, and can yield incredible results.  As the only evidence based culture change initiative, it has been proven, and together with Green House adopters around the country, there is a responsibility to protect it.   The Model Enrichment Resource & Integrity Tool (MERIT) was developed in response to insights gained through research.  It is used as a tool to assess model integrity across all Green House homes.

MERIT Assessments

The term MERIT  (Model Enrichment Resource and Integrity Tool) is used to describe the GH model integrity process. However, MERIT is an umbrella term for several GH evaluation and assessment tools.

 MERIT Staff Assessment

  • The MERIT Staff Assessment is designed to evaluate the application of the core values of Real Home, Meaningful Life, and Empowered Staff in Green House homes. The MERIT Staff Assessment launched in 2015 and has been administered to open Green House homes in 2015 and 2016. It is used to measure how model fidelity manifests in practice.

MERIT Organizational Outcomes Assessment (new for 2017)

  • This tool gathers quality outcomes from Green House organizations including key clinical and financial indicators. These clinical and financial benchmarks will provide a valuable comparison to the MERIT Staff Assessment data, and parallels an organization’s data collection through its QI and QM processes.

MERIT Staff Assessment for Legacy Homes (new for 2017)

  • This online tool assesses the application of The Green House core values in a legacy environment. Green House organizations interested in assessing the level of alignment to the core values in their legacy environment and understanding the level of cultural transformation across the organization may contract with GHP for the delivery of the assessment tool. Participation is voluntary. The administration of this assessment tool follows the same process as the GH MERIT Staff Assessment.

More Information

The Green House model is based on three fundamental core values: Meaningful Life, Empowered Staff, and Real Home.  These values play an important role in successfully implementing and sustaining the integrity of the Green House model, as evidenced by:

  • Consistent care delivery and shared goals among Green House adopters
  • The most comprehensive approach to holistic culture change grounded in elder-centered values and essential practices
  • Standards that protect the integrity of The Green House brand and investment of organizations who have committed to the model
  • On-going opportunities for Green House peer support and accountability
  • Impact on a national scale with emphasis on research and growth of the model

The design and administration of the MERIT online assessment and database management process is managed by the Center for Social Research (CSR) at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  CSR conducts social-scientific research on behalf of Calvin faculty and a wide array of local, national, and international organizations.  Each year, the tool evolves and is refined.

 

 

 

 


The First Green House Homes in Rhode Island Are Open

By / Posted on May 22nd, 2017

THE GREEN HOUSE Homes at Saint Elizabeth Home in East Greenwich are open! These are the first new nursing homes to open in RI in over 25 years.