An Outing To Enjoy The Season Reflects True Empowerment

By / Posted on February 25th, 2017

Kris Angevine with house pup, Lexi

 

One of my proudest moments as a Guide for the Penfield Green House homes was when one of the Shahbazim (self-managed team of direct care staff), Wendy, texted me and said “Hurray!  We made it!” … I didn’t know what she meant and I was at our legacy building about 20 minutes away so I couldn’t just pop over to clarify the news.  The therapeutic recreation specialist for our Green House homes, Mimi,  has an office across from me, so I moseyed over to her and asked her if she knew what Wendy could mean?   Mimi said “Nope, I don’t know anything.” So, I texted Wendy back and asked her “Made it where?  What are you all up to?” She replied, “Check Facebook!”

photo on Facebook of elders riding to their Naples adventure

I didn’t have time to check the site, as I was rushing off to another meeting so it was an hour later before I was able to close the loop.  As it turned out,  all 10 elders, the Shahbazim and a Nurse were buying grape pies in Naples, NY which is about 2 hours away.  The team planned the whole thing, scheduled the van, grabbed the credit card, and even got the other House to come over and check on Lexi, the house dog, because this was her first time on her own.  On their way home, they stopped for lunch, and enjoyed the iconic fall scenery in upstate NY.  It was beautiful, well executed, and neither the “boss” or “activities” knew anything about it.

True empowerment at its best!


Chief Experience Officer, New Position Created to Support Person-Directed Care

By / Posted on June 29th, 2016

The Green House model is a radical transformation of traditional long term care.  As a national initiative, Green House adopters are continuously innovating, taking this already proven model to new heights.  The New Jewish Home (formerly, Jewish Home Lifecare), has named veteran eldercare executive Tammy L. Marshall its first Chief Experience Officer, to support a deep and sustained culture change. Ms. Marshall was previously the organization’s Director of Green House Education.

tammy_marshall_headshot2016_preferredIn this newly created position, Ms. Marshall is responsible for leading efforts to create the best possible experience for everyone whom the organization touches.  Ms. Marshall’s chief responsibility will be to ensure that the central tenet of The Green House model—that power resides with the elder and those working closest to them– permeates all facets of the organization.  Building relationships and new kinds of connections between staff members and residents, will be a critical part of Ms. Marshall’s job.

Said Audrey Weiner, President and CEO, The New Jewish Home: “There is no one better qualified to become our first chief experience officer than Tammy Marshall. She brings to the job not only the technical skills and the experience required, but also an unparalleled commitment to the humanity that underlies The Green House model and person-directed care. She is an unrepentant evangelist for the right of elders and those who care for them to live fully realized lives in which their wishes and their contributions are uniquely valued.”

To be called The Living Center of Manhattan, the 20-story structure will be New York City’s first Green House residence and the first to be built in a major urban environment. In keeping with The New Jewish Home’s focus on putting a persons’ wishes first, several of The Living Center’s 22 individual Green House households will be kosher and, in another first for New York City, at least one will be all-LGBTQ, although LGTBQ residents will be welcome in every household.

It has been said that culture change is a journey without a destination, and The New Jewish Home is helping to shape the changing landscape of aging in society.  For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

 


Personalized Care Creates Real Homes for Elders

By / Posted on March 25th, 2016

kiplinger_horizontalThe Green House model “goes to the idea that regardless of age people still have a chance to have a meaningful life where they can experience joy and create value,” Scott Brown, Director of Outreach, The Green House Project says.  In a recent article Kiplinger Retirement News editor, Susan Garland, visits two Green House organizations, Leonard Florence Center for Living and Eddy Village Green and shares her experience with this innovative model:

It’s a common refrain that adult children hear from their parents: “No matter what, promise that you’ll never put me in a nursing home.” These seniors obviously have not visited a Green House, a unique alternative to the traditional nursing facility.

By highlighting the comprehensive transformation that occurs when an organization implements The Green House model, Garland is able to show that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and that the cornerstone of the model’s effectiveness is the deep relationships that form as a result: “In the traditional nursing home, you don’t have time to develop the relationships that you have in these homes,” says James Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green. “When you have the same group of people taking care of the same group of elders, you get to know what they like and don’t like.”

old and young hand

old and young hand

 

To read more stories and experiences from these Green House homes, read the full article here>>


The Green House Project Attends Event at The White House

By / Posted on October 20th, 2015

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Representatives of The New Jewish Home including CEO, Audrey Weiner (right)

Policy makers have the potential to make a huge difference in the lives of elders and long term care providers.  Recently, The Green House Project participated in the Briefing on Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) Innovation and Technology.  Some innovations were technical in nature and some were a result of old fashioned intuition and common sense. The Administration and government representatives were duly impressed with what they heard through these AJAS presentations.

Green House adopter, The New Jewish Home, in Manhattan, NY, discussed their career growth program that develops young people for success in working with elders.  This opportunity to be in the hallowed walls of the White House, where so many important decisions are made, reminded us of the gravity of our work, and the impetus to create better places where we can age and work.


Dr. Atul Gawande Speaks About Life and ‘Being Mortal’ to a Crowd in NYC

By / Posted on October 13th, 2015

Dr. Atul Gawande speaks at The New Jewish Home  3rd Annual Himan Brown Symposium at the AXA Auditorium in New York, NY on October 2, 2015.  (photo by Stephen Smith)

Dr. Atul Gawande speaks at The New Jewish Home 3rd Annual Himan Brown Symposium at the AXA Auditorium in New York, NY on October 2, 2015. (photo by Stephen Smith)

More than 400 of The New Jewish Home’s friends, care partners, colleagues and supporters joined them on Friday, October 2nd at the AXA Auditorium in Manhattan as they hosted featured speaker, Dr. Atul Gawande.  Author of the best-selling book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, Dr. Gawande led the audience through the challenges we all face when making end-of-life choices for our loved ones and ourselves.  He spent some of his presentation highlighting the work of Dr. Bill Thomas and THE GREEN HOUSE (R) Project by sharing how the model is transforming long-term care and allowing elders to define what a good day means for them. Dr. Gawande applauded The New Jewish Home’s initiative in creating the Living Center of Manhattan, which will be the first 20 story Green House in a major metropolitan area, and for already opening 3 small houses based on The Green House model in their Westchester nursing home, the Sarah Neuman Center. Dr. Gawande cited these as true examples of positive transformation in eldercare.

Dr. Audrey Weiner and NY Times best selling author Dr. Atul Gawande discuss audience questions at The New Jewish Home  3rd Annual Himan Brown Symposium at the AXA Auditorium in New York, NY on October 2, 2015.  (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Dr. Audrey Weiner and NY Times best selling author Dr. Atul Gawande discuss audience questions at The New Jewish Home 3rd Annual Himan Brown Symposium at the AXA Auditorium in New York, NY on October 2, 2015. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

After his remarks, Dr. Gawande was joined on stage by The New Jewish Home’s CEO, Dr. Audrey Weiner, to engage in further dialogue on how we in America can do the best job possible caring for our elders.  The conversation was made possible and paid in full by a generous grant from the Himan Brown Charitable Trust, and the symposium is part of Jewish Home’s ongoing ongoing mission to change the way people think about and talk about eldercare.

The takeaway? Talking about death and dying is actually a conversation about life, and we should be having it with our loved ones sooner than we think.


St. John’s, Delivering the Highest Quality at the Best Cost

By / Posted on July 15th, 2015

Rebecca Priest engages with elders at the Penfield Green House homes

Rebecca Priest engages with elders at the Penfield Green House homes

Rebecca Priest, Chief Operating Officer, and Jim Clark, Chief Financial Officer, of St. John’s homes in Rochester, NY share their Green House journey through the lens of delivering financial success to their organization and value to their customer. In the webinar St. John’s Journey: Providing the Best Quality of Care at the Lowest Operating Cost, Rebecca and Jim encourage listeners to “rethink all that you think you know” in order to provide the most incredible, elder engaged service at the best value in Green House homes.

Jim Clark, VP and CFO identifies that financial stability “is the side effect of doing things right.” Specifically, elder growth and well-being through positive clinical outcomes in addition to successful employees through retention and labor costs results in financial stability in two forms; revenue and predictability.

Listen to the webinar here: http://impact.adobeconnect.com/p93l2594uu2/


Kris Angevine, Living The Green House Model

By / Posted on April 8th, 2015

Reposted from www.stjohnsliving.org

Kris.pngWhen it comes to long-term care, Kris Angevine strongly believes smaller is better.

“It’s better for relationships with the residents and it’s better for the teams who take such good care of them,” Kris, who serves as the Guide at the Penfied Green House homes, said on a mild March day in 2015. “You get to know the residents so well. And if anything changes, you can respond immediately. This leads to a better quality of life.”

Having worked at St. John’s now for 11 years—first in dining services and for the past three years as a Green House and Eden Alternative guide, educator, and mentor—Kris also believes that residents should have as many choices and as much autonomy as possible. In her multiple roles, Kris helps develop self-managing teams that can care for Green House home elders with a minimum of supervision.

As a member of many teams in the past, Kris said it does not make sense to have a supervisor hovering over staff members who know how to do their jobs. At the Penfield Green House Homes, those staff members are called shahbazim (plural), a Persian word meaning “royal falcon.” At St. John’s, each shahbaz is a versatile, universal worker who sees to all the residents’ needs.

Eden Alternative co-creator Dr. Bill Thomas came up with the idea to apply this term. They are tasked with caring for the 20 elders who live in the two homes, which were built in 2012. Whether submitting work orders, providing care and companionship, building consensus, or providing treatment, the shahbazim, along with the nurses and an on-call doctor, do it all. The main household tasks of shopping, cooking, housekeeping, and laundry are done on a rotating basis so no one person has only one job.

The premise for the Green House model is to create a real home for elders to continue living a meaningful life and create an empowered staff. The staff’s goal is to eliminate the three “plagues of the spirit”: loneliness, helplessness, and boredom. The Penfield Homes are two of more than 170 located in 27 states, and the only community-based homes in the country.

It’s no small task to keep these houses running day after day. But through the considerable dedication and hard work of everyone involved, the Whitman and Moore homes are indeed Eden-like in both form and function. The houses are also well integrated into a quiet, multigenerational community. It takes a great deal of work, planning, and attention to detail to make it all happen, but the best people are on the job to ensure it does.

“I’ve been in the trenches my whole life,” Kris said of the work that prepared her to do this. For her part, Kris is involved in the big picture. Ultimately responsible for the Green House Homes operations, she provides the skills, tools, and resources needed to run the houses. She offers advice on problem solving and maintains relationships with the shahbazim, nurses, elders, and family members. Born in Tucson, Arizona, to a military family, Kris grew up in Titusville, Pennsylvania. Her career in the dining industry led her from North Carolina to Rochester 25 years ago. She and her husband Chris, a mechanical engineer, live in Rochester with their three cats. In addition to music and dancing, Kris has also been working in ceramics for the past year crafting hand-made bowls.

Kris also loves dogs, and assisted the elders to adopt a very friendly one named Lexi last year. After coming to consensus, Lexi came to live at Moore House last June. Together with all the other aesthetic and functional elements, Lexi’s canine companionship truly makes Moore House a home.

“It’s real life here,” Kris says. “We’ve laughed, we’ve cried, we’ve fought. It’s not sterile. It takes a lot of patience, but we work hard to build trust and keep the elders out of harm’s way.”Kris


Eight over Eighty, Celebrates Elders and Raises Funds for Green House homes in Manhattan

By / Posted on March 4th, 2015

Green House adopter, Jewish Home Lifecare, raises funds for person-directed care as it celebrates 8 remarkable elders who are over the age of 80

manhattan-3

The annual benefit gala hosted by New York City’s Jewish Home Lifecare, a 167-year-old elder care provider, is most definitely not the same old, same old. It is, in fact, an event unlike any other.

PatJacobson-large

Pat Jacobson, a long time board member for JHL is one of the honorees

Called “Eight Over Eighty” and slated to take place on Wednesday, March 11, at the Mandarin Oriental New York, the event will pay tribute to eight New Yorkers who, in their 80s and 90s, continue to live lives of remarkable achievement, vitality and civic engagement.

The second annual “Eight Over Eighty” will honor author and photographer ARLENE ALDA, cabaret artist BARBARA CARROLL, actor JOEL GREY, graphic designer MILTON GLASER (of, among many other things, fame), volunteer extraordinaire PATRICIA (PAT) JACOBS, and business people and philanthropists CHARLES M. DIKER, IRWIN HOCHBERG, and RITA & FRED RICHMAN.
(The first event, in 2014, honored an equally impressive line-up of octogenarians and nonagenarians: actor DOMINIC “UNCLE JUNIOR SOPRANO” CHIANESE; gay rights trailblazer EDIE WINDSOR; power couple and developer of 1 World Trade Center KLARA & LARRY SILVERSTEIN,; DICK EISNER, founder of one of the country’s largest and most successful accounting firms; EMILY & EUGENE GRANT, philanthropist and real estate developer; and JOAN WACHTLER, a tireless champion of the aging.)

“This event reflects the changing times we live in – times that will see 30 percent of the U.S. population reach 80 or older by 2030,” says CEO Audrey Weiner. “It also goes right to the heart of what Jewish Home Lifecare is all about: celebrating the vitality of older adults, honoring their lives, and respecting their individuality.”

Jewish Home Lifecare is one of the nation’s largest and most diversified nonprofit geriatric care institutions. Each year it provides 12,000 elders with healthcare services and long-term living options suited to their individual needs. Those options include short-term rehabilitation, long-term skilled nursing care, semi- and fully-independent-living residences, and day programs on three campuses, in The Bronx, Manhattan and Westchester. Through its telemedicine program and its extensive home healthcare network, Jewish Home also enables thousands of New Yorkers to age in place.

The money raised by “Eight Over Eighty” will go to support Jewish Home’s person-directed approach to eldercare, an approach epitomized by the long-term care residence being developed for the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Called The Living Center of Manhattan and slated to break ground later this year, the 414-bed structure will be the first GREEN HOUSE® home manhattanin New York City and the first to be built in a major metropolitan, high-rise environment.

The Living Center will have 22 of the Green House model’s trademark small, nurturing households, each with 12 private bedrooms and baths clustered around a large, homey shared living and dining space. Dedicated staff will prepare meals and arrange activities, outings and special events according to residents’ wishes, and provide whatever assistance they need with dressing, dining and other daily tasks. Medical personnel will be centralized elsewhere in the building, providing ongoing monitoring and care as appropriate.

The result will be a long-term care environment that offers residents the privacy, dignity and autonomy every human being deserves as well as the comfort and support of a small, close-knit community. The residents, by living in a place reminiscent of the New York City homes in which they spent much, if not all, of their adulthood, will be able to stay connected to the lives they have lived and the familiar surroundings in which they have lived them.

manhattan_2Jewish Home Lifecare has already implemented the Green House philosophy to eldercare at its Westchester branch, known as the Sarah Neuman Center. There, 26 elders are comfortably and happily settled in two of what will be seven Green House model inspired homes known as Small Houses.  “The Green House model is the future not only of Jewish Home Lifecare, but of long-term care for all older adults,” says Weiner. “There is no other model that actively recognizes the personhood of the men and women we are privileged to care for and that enables them to take the lead in their own lives.”

Click on these links to learn more about Jewish Home Lifecare’s Living Center in Manhattan and Small Houses in Westchester, or contact Tammy Marshall, Director, Green House Project, at Jewish Home at TMarshall@jewishhome.org.


THE GREEN HOUSE® Project in New York Press Article

By / Posted on May 28th, 2013

Last week, the New York Press published an article  about the Health Policy Symposium recently hosted by Jewish Home Lifecare and the Himan Brown Charitable Trust in New York City. During the symposium, speakers discussed the needs of a rapidly aging population and the simultaneous decline in the health care workforce. One panelist, Dr. Ezekiel Emanual, a former special advisor to the White House, spoke to the importance of affordable and quality health care for aging adults.

Another panelist, Jane Lowe, Senior Advisor for Program Development at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, championed the Green House homes as “…better models for people to age with grace and dignity.” Ms. Lowe also showed her support for the Village model as another important new model of care for an aging population.

The New York Press article describes the Green House Project as a model that “…provides the support of a nursing home while still allowing its residents the autonomy, warmth, and respect of a traditional house or apartment.” The conclusion of the article is a description of Jewish Home Lifecare’s plan to develop Green House homes on a city scale at the Living Center of Manhattan. These will be the first Green House homes in New York City.

Currently, there are 146 Green House homes in 24 states, serving 1,539 elders. There are 123 homes in development.  Click here to find a Green House home near you!


"The Heart of the Home"—Elders, families and staff endorse the Green House homes in New York

By / Posted on May 29th, 2012

aka Catholic Health East Horizons

“We see far fewer elders struggling with behaviors, which we believe is a result of a quieter, calmer environment, increased privacy and a deeper knowing of the elders by staff who provide the care,” said James Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green.  In addition, Farnan says they have also seen a sustained reduction in falls among the elders living in the homes. 

The Eddy Village Green is located in Cohoes, New York and is comprised of 16 Green House homes.  It opened in 2008 and is home for 192 elders. 

Quality of life and quality of care are applauded by the families of elders at the Eddy.  Comments include how ‘attentive and compassionate all the staff were’ ‘Dad was so loved and so well cared for by everyone’, and one family wrote ‘The concept of the the individual houses for a small number of residents is wonderful; but it’s just a house unless you have people like the staff…who truly make it a home’. 

Read more about the homes that comprise the largest Green House home campus in the country.  The full story can be found on page 3 of the Spring 2012 edition of Catholic Health East HorizonsLet us know what you think!

 


“The Heart of the Home”—Elders, families and staff endorse the Green House homes in New York

By / Posted on May 29th, 2012

aka Catholic Health East Horizons

“We see far fewer elders struggling with behaviors, which we believe is a result of a quieter, calmer environment, increased privacy and a deeper knowing of the elders by staff who provide the care,” said James Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green.  In addition, Farnan says they have also seen a sustained reduction in falls among the elders living in the homes. 

The Eddy Village Green is located in Cohoes, New York and is comprised of 16 Green House homes.  It opened in 2008 and is home for 192 elders. 

Quality of life and quality of care are applauded by the families of elders at the Eddy.  Comments include how ‘attentive and compassionate all the staff were’ ‘Dad was so loved and so well cared for by everyone’, and one family wrote ‘The concept of the the individual houses for a small number of residents is wonderful; but it’s just a house unless you have people like the staff…who truly make it a home’. 

Read more about the homes that comprise the largest Green House home campus in the country.  The full story can be found on page 3 of the Spring 2012 edition of Catholic Health East HorizonsLet us know what you think!

 


Community integrated Green House homes provide a New York neighborhood with something special…licensed nursing home care

By / Posted on May 2nd, 2012

It takes a variety of homes to make up a neighborhood—so why not build Green House homes in existing communities?  There are those who would question whether it’s possible…but in upstate New York it’s proving to be a wonderful addition to the neighborhood and a shining example of skilled nursing home care.

While many of us would clearly prefer home and community-based care, it’s estimated that 1.2 million Americans currently live in institutional facilities.  This rings especially true for low-income elders and others who lack access to affordable nursing services in their area.

Green House homes offer elders a place where autonomy and choice are honored, direct skilled nursing care is a priority, and they have more satisfying and meaningful lives, work and relationships.  When the home is located within a neighborhood—it also meets that desire for community-based services.

St. John’s Home in Rochester, New York opened the first two community-integrated Green House homes two months ago and will part of an evaluation of the concept over the next three years.

CLICK HERE to read the full story.

Tell us what you think below!