Green House homes as an Innovation for Short-Term Rehabilitation

By / Posted on January 14th, 2014

In the December print version of Long Term Living, an article by the Director of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, David Farrell explores the new customer for Short Term Rehab and how The Green House model can meet their needs.

The customer for short-term rehabilitation is changing, and as the baby boomers continue to age, providers must adapt to meet the needs and desires of this influential demographic.  Long Term Living Magazine highlights one of these innovations, by demonstrating how rehabilitation thrives in a Green House setting.

This new patient is more empowered, more likely to question care decisions and seek alternate opinions, and generally be a more active participant in his or her care. The Boomer also expects to remain active, stimulated and social during recovery—not isolated and treated as frail. Given this significant shift in their consumer base, nursing homes must rethink their approach to short-term rehab (and long-term care, for that matter). Boomers will be seeking—and expecting—a lot of it in the coming years.

Director of The Green House Project, David Farrell, writes about this changing customer and the success of The Green House model to meet their needs by highlighting Leonard Florence Center for Living, “The reason that the Green House Project offers such a strong model for short-term rehab boils down to the concept of home. By making elders feel truly at home, the Green House model actually helps residents rehabilitate faster—and in a safer environment.”  Bob Richman experienced rehabilitation at Leonard Florence and shares the difference that he attributes to the real home environment, “I’ve been in skilled rehab two times: once at a traditional nursing home and once here in a Green House home. It’s not just the exercise here that gets you well again…it’s the people around you having a similar experience. It’s coming together around the table for our meals. It really works.”

It is not only the anecdotes of success, but also the data that is telling a positive story, ” On average nationwide, 20 percent of elders return to the hospital within their first 30 days of stay at a nursing home.At Leonard Florence, the rate has been half that—around 10 percent. Staff members also have reported an increase in the number of referrals from discharge planners, orthopedic doctors and repeat customers who need new procedures. ”

The Green House Project currently has 150 homes in 24 states around the country, and sees short term rehabilitation as an innovation that will continue to grow as the customer demands more personalized care in a setting that is both comfortable and effective.

Full Article in Long Term Living >>