The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Dementia

By / Posted on September 10th, 2015

Dr. Al Power will be conducting an all day preconference session along with a plenary and education session at The Eighth Annual Green House Meeting & Celebration in Broomfield, CO from November 16-18th. The annual meeting is for Green House members only and this year’s theme is Better Together.  The title of Dr. Power’s preconference session is “Reframing Dementia.”  His plenary session is entitled “Living Better Together with Dementia: Taking it Further” and his education session is “Real Life Without Antipsychotic Drugs.”  Log-in to the Peer Network website today to register for the meeting so you can hear from Dr. Power first hand!

 

Like most people, I am subject to a regular barrage of media reports, coming from radio, television, internet news outlets, social media and daily RSS feeds. And here is what this information stream has taught me:

If I eat blueberries, I’ll lower my risk of Alzheimer’s. Or was that tomatoes? It now appears that yogurt lowers the risk as well—does that mean blueberry yogurt, or will any old flavor do? Maybe I should have coconut flavored yogurt, because apparently, if all that coconut oil doesn’t kill me with a heart attack, it may make my brain healthier.

And now it appears I may have to replace my plumbing, because a new study suggests that too much copper causes Alzheimer’s; though other medical studies have shown that a high copper intake actually lowers the risk. So which is it? And is lead involved? (I need to know because I tend to chew on my pencils when I do my daily Sudoku puzzles.)

And then there’s the glucose connection, the blood pressure connection, the inflammatory connection, the brain reserve connection, the mood disorder connection, the social connections connection.

And what kind of a teenager was I? Apparently, certain adolescent behaviors raise your risk. One of them is getting drunk; well, thank God, none of us ever did that! Also, it’s a risk if you have a history of adolescent antipsychotic use. (Tell that to the psychiatrists who are finding all kinds of new reasons to prescribe these drugs to young people, from depression to “oppositional disorders”.)

Another risk factor (cue Randy Newman) is being too short. Time to get out the gravity boots? And if that weren’t bad enough, now the folks in Manhattan say dementia can come from exposure to bacterial and viral infections. (Someone sneezed on me just the other day, and I swear my ADAS-Cog score dropped two points!)

Okay everyone, are you listening to me?? STOP! Just…stop. If there were a “Hitchhiker’s Guide to Dementia”, the first words would still be: “Don’t panic.”
Time…to…take…a…deep…breath.

What we have here is a collection of illnesses closely tied to the aging process, and a sequence of changes that may begin decades before we show any outward signs. And we are dissecting all the minutiae of the millions of things we do, eat, drink or experience in our lives—trying to find connections, however tenuous, that we can shoot to the media outlets to fuel the frenzy.

There are a lot of people making money off of our hysteria and paranoia. But it’s much worse than that.

You see, the more we fuel this kind of panic, the more we demonize the condition; and consequently, the more we demonize and dehumanize people who live with cognitive disability. Folks like Dr. Bill Thomas have long warned us that those people who do less or produce less are devalued in our society. It is also now clear that a similar fate befalls those who remember less in our hyper-cognitive, technology-obsessed world.

Here are a couple of known facts to keep in mind: We all die. Many of us who live to a ripe old age will experience changes in various organ functions and capabilities. Many of us will become forgetful as we reach our later years. Those who do are not bad people.

There is so much emphasis on “successful aging” these days—what does that mean? Are you successful if you run marathons until you are 96 and then die in your sleep, or at the completion of some incredible sexual escapade? That’s romantic, but highly subjective and unlikely. More important, this fixation on how we end our lives not only threatens to devalue who we are in our last years, but also how we have lived all of the earlier days of our lives.

And if you don’t make it to the grave with all of your organ functions intact (an oxymoron in itself), what is that called? “Failed aging”? What about people born with developmental disabilities or congenital illness? They would be “failed agers” from the very start. No need to even give them blueberries and yogurt, I guess.

You and I will always be more than the sum of what we can do and what we can remember. So here’s the advice I would put in my “Hitchhiker’s Guide”:

No matter who you are or how you live your life, you have a chance of becoming forgetful as you age. Your risk is never zero, but no one knows your exact “number”. You can almost certainly lower that risk somewhat if you eat well, exercise and do things that are good for your body, mind, and spirit; your risk will probably go up if you abuse any of those. But being obsessive about every little thing you do will likely not improve your odds to a greater extent than healthy moderation.

Find that “sweet spot” that gives you a life worth living. When we stop indulging the fear mongers, we can see the value in people of all abilities. This will help us to visualize a true path to well-being for all.


THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

By / Posted on July 13th, 2015

For Immediate Release: Friday, July 10, 2015

 Contact: Rachel McLean, rmclean@capitalimpact.org, 703-850-1897

Kavan Peterson, kavanpeterson@gmail.com, 206-305-2798

 

THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

Innovative Model for Elder Care Receives Attention from National Leadership

Arlington, VA: The Green House Project’s landmark approach to skilled nursing care will be highlighted at the White House Conference on Aging.  The objective of the conference, which happens only once every 10 years, is to identify and advance actions to improve the quality of life of older Americans, and to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

Since 2003, Green House homes have gone beyond simply providing quality medical care to elders: they’ve offered an environment and support system that enables each person to retain their individuality, and to live in a real home.

Nora Super, executive director at the White House Conference on Aging, recently visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Massachusetts and video footage from this visit will be shown during the event.  This conference will draw greater attention to the model that is changing the face of elder care throughout the country.

“We live in an exciting era of growth and change in which outdated models of long term care are, at long last, being disrupted and replaced,” said Bill Thomas, geriatrician and founder of The Green House Project, who will attend the conference. “I am delighted that the White House Conference on Aging will be bringing well deserved attention to how we’re helping America reimagine care and caregiving in the 21st Century.”

Green House homes, which serve only 10-12 elders at a time, have private rooms and baths and a common, open kitchen. Supportive and versatile caregivers deliver outstanding care and engage in deep knowing relationships with elders. By comprehensively transforming the architecture, organizational design and philosophy of care, the model provides elders with high quality health care and a high quality of life that far exceeds the experience in traditional nursing homes.

In 2003, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation helped pioneer the first Green House home in Tupelo, Mississippi. Today, more than 180 Green House homes are in existence in 28 states across the country, and more than 150 are in development.

Not only are Green House homes rising in popularity, they have been shown to reduce costs of care and treatment and offer a solution to delivering higher quality care at a competitive cost in the U.S.

“The Green House model is based in the belief that all people deserve to live their whole life to its fullest,” said Susan Frazier, senior director of The Green House Project. “With a decade of proven success, we are at a tipping point for the growth of this model and see the power that real home has on the health and wellbeing of elders and those who love them.”

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The Green House Project

A partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Capital Impact Partners and the Center for Growing and Becoming, The Green House Project provides consulting, organizational development services,  and ongoing support to providers and local organizations to support the development and operation of Green House homes across the country. To date, more than 180 Green Home homes are in operation.

 

 


Music Can Be at the Heart of a Life Worth Living

By / Posted on January 6th, 2015

As a geriatrician, I’ve spent much of my time in the company of elders exploring life beyond adulthood. The shortcomings of our medical system to meet the human needs of elders as they navigate this uncharted territory are too numerous to list. Particularly when it comes to the way in which it treats people living with dementia. Of the 1.5 million people who have been institutionalized for medical problems, about 80 percent have been segregated from the general population because they are living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Because our medical system treats the trials of sickness, aging and changing cognitive ability exclusively as medical concerns, these people are too often tucked away from sight and treated with powerful psychotropic drugs. The treatment is not aimed at providing relief or a cure, but at making the patient more manageable – at the cost of hundreds of millions of dollars for drugs that provide limited relief and cause significant side effects.

For more than a decade, a handful of passionate organizations and advocates like myself have argued, and proved, that it can be different. Programs like The Eden Alternative, Ecumen’s Awakenings (http://www.ecumenawakenings.org), Anne Basting’s Timeslips (http://www.timeslips.org) and Dr. Al Power’s book “Dementia Beyond Drugs” demonstrate that non-pharmacological interventions for dementia provide meaningful benefits without the cost or the dangers of psychotropic drugs.

One of the most exciting of these new techniques is also the most elegantly simple – providing personalized music to people living with dementia.

The benefits of providing music to a person who has lost access to it include better memory, improved mood, decreased pain, increased engagement and enhanced well-being. Clinical studies demonstrate that it is possible for personalized music to have a greater effect than any medication.

Anyone who has doubts about the efficacy of personalized music can watch the technique graphically demonstrated in Alive Inside, the groundbreaking documentary on music and memory that is now available on DVD and streaming on Netflix.

I was honored to participate in the filming of Alive Inside with director Michael Rossato-Bennett. Time and again, Michael’s camera captured small miracles as life re-ignites in the eyes of people who have long been unresponsive after they are exposed to familiar, beloved tunes.

This simple, elegant film opens the door to a conversation about how we think about aging in general and about what we think makes a life worth living. For too long we have put the fate of our elders – our fate – into the hands of a medical system designed to focus exclusively on the repair of health and ignore what makes life significant. We’re not going to see music in the lives of every old person until we confront our own fear of aging and our own fear of death and demand a long term care system that does more than provide for safety and protection of elders. If we do that, we can build a society where nursing home means “nurturing” home. Where people go there to grow and live and love and laugh and listen to good music.

Music can be at the heart of the conversation about what makes a life worth living.


Highlights of 2014 for The Green House Project

By / Posted on December 29th, 2014

2014 has been a whirlwind year for The Green House Project. There have been so many relationships, conversations and experiences with people around the country who are making deep change for elders and those working closest to them.  The year culminated at our 7th Annual Meeting and Celebration, where record numbers of Green House adopters came together to capitalize on the momentum, energy and knowledge that is collectively growing.   Working with innovative and high quality organizations, how can we not be inspired, and spurred forward to spread this model even further? It is hard to sum up the year in a way that honors all of these individual moments, but here is a sampling of some of the highlights to demonstrate that this model is not only the right thing to do, but also the smart thing.

There have been a number of firsts:
Green House Homes Opened in Colorado. The grand opening for The Green House Homes at Mirasol, located in Loveland, Colorado, was significant for many reasons. This project marked the first Green House homes in Colorado, the 27th state to open this model, and also utilized public/private partnerships to make this model accessible to low income elders. Read more about this project on Capital Impact Partners‘, website.
Green House Homes Approved in Rhode Island by the Department of Health. While a moratorium on building new nursing home beds has been in place for years in Rhode Island, the state acknowledged the need for an innovative model of long term care. St. Elizabeth Home has received approval to build 4 new Green House homes. Read more.
State Regulators Unanimously Approve Plans for the First Green House Homes in Missouri. Gaining a Certificate of need for new nursing home beds is no small feat. The Healthcare Facilities

Review Committee of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services granted approval for an 80 bed Certificate of Need to build Green House homes in Ozark. Read more.

Some great press coverage:
Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal. Chapter 5 of this best-selling book focuses on culture change and the Green House model. In the media coverage of the book, as well as interviews, there’s a lot of discussion about the Green House model. On Diane Rehm’s show on NPR he called the Green House model “revolutionary.” and The President bought the book to read over the holidays!

Kiplinger. In the retirement planning issue, which covers a variety of topics, including advice on finding the right nursing home. They recommend consideration of organizations that have implemented culture change or that offer Green House homes. Read more.

Research and resources to ensure growth with integrity:
The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE) honored for studies: The longitudinal studies by researchers from top universities, and funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, has been completed. Their work has already received high honors, such as the Ollie Randall Symposium at the 2015 Gerontological Society of America conference. This research provides insights into the quality, cost and sustainability of The Green House and other culture change models.
Design Manual and Model Integrity Process: The Green House team has developed guidelines for architects and operators to build homes that are warm, smart and green (‘green’, meaning a place where people grow). This manual will be used as a tool for groups under contract with The Green House Project. Once opened, Green House homes now participate in a model integrity process to protect their investment in the model and to ensure that the elements of the model will grow and thrive.

And some other great news:
Dr. Bill Thomas’ Second Wind Tour. Susan Frazier and David Farrell joined Dr. Thomas on a 25 city tour to offer audience members powerful insights into slower, deeper, more connected ways of living & working. Watch Susan’s talk
Occupancy Growth Exceeds Expectations. At the Water’s Edge, with newly opened Green House homes, the rush of elders interested in moving in has exceeded expectations. Read more.
Tomah VA Medical Center Opens Two New Green House Homes. The Tomah VAMC became the fourth VAMC campus to offer Green House homes to veterans. Read more.

This is just a sampling of some of the wonderful things happening with The Green House Project. Along with amazing people and organizations, we are transforming the way that we age. To become a part of this movement in 2015, contact us or visit our website: thegreenhouseproject.org


The New York Times Features the Green House Model

By / Posted on December 22nd, 2014

Word traveled quickly last week after The New York Times published an article by Jane Brody entitled, “The Green House Effect: Homes for the Elderly to Thrive.” It took only several days after the piece was published to our Facebook page for over 16,000 people to see the article, many of whom liked or shared Brody’s insights with their own social networks.

The author creates a clear and powerful image of the Green House model and its core values with support from interviews with Dr. Bill Thomas and Steve McAlilly, CEO of Mississippi Methodist Senior Services in Tupelo, MS. By showing readers that Green House homes provide Elders with a nurturing and respectful environment where they can continue to thrive, Brody exposes the “medicalization of old age” that many of the 1.5 million Americans living and working in nursing homes experience each day.

Today, nearly 2,000 Elders across the nation are living in Green House homes in partnership with caring Shahbazim, clinical support teams and families. The swell of national recognition that we have received over the past year is a clear indication that the Green House model is well positioned to experience rapid growth and adoption in the new year as Americans embrace the power of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff as they age.


Dr. Mary Jane Koren Highlights Dr. Bill Thomas at LTCCC Event

By / Posted on November 4th, 2014

Last month, The Green House Project  helped sponsor the Long Term Care Community Coalition’s Sixth Annual Reception which honored the life and work of Mary Jane Koren, M.D., M.P.H. at the Alzheimer’s Association chapter in New York City.  Dr. Koren’s experience includes her work as Vice President for LTC Quality Improvement at The Commonwealth Fund and her position as past chair of Advancing Excellence: Long-Term Care Collaborative.

During her acceptance speech, Dr. Koren shared that, “…between 1950 and 2050, there will be a 10-fold increase in the percent of the population over 85, which is exactly the age cohort most dependent on long-term care services and supports.” She argued that the best way to address this need is to move away from a model that “…puts institutional priorities ahead of resident choice…” and instead follow Dr. Bill Thomas’ lead in creating long-term care models that alleviate loneliness, helplessness and boredom. She shared with the audience that, “Bill Thomas’ philosophy, even at that early stage was, for me an epiphany. I suddenly ‘got’ OBRA’87 in a way I never had before.”

You can read Dr. Koren’s full speech here.

Congratulations to Dr. Koren for her work as a thought leader and innovator in the aging field! We appreciate the work you have done to make the Green House model a reality for so many elders nationwide.



Dr. Atul Gawande Examines Life Worth Living in Green House Homes

By / Posted on October 9th, 2014

This month, Dr. Atul Gawande is promoting the release of his new book, “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End,” which challenges readers to think carefully about the decisions they make for themselves and their loved ones at the end of life.

During an interview with the Diane Rehm Show on NPR this week, Dr. Gawande asked listeners to strive for more than simply “a good death.” Instead, he says we must ask ourselves what brings the most meaning and purpose to our lives and fill our days with those things, to the best of our ability, until we die. During the interview, Dr. Gawande mentions The Green House Project as an organization that is working tirelessly to expand a model of autonomy, growth, and purposeful living to individuals at the end of their lives. The full interview transcript is here, in addition to the audio recording.

At an appearance in Washington, D.C. last night, Dr. Gawande spoke to a crowd of over two hundred people about the innovative approach of The Green House model in skilled nursing care. In Chapter 5 of his new book he writes that Green House homes are “…designed to pursue that idea that a life worth living can be created…by focusing on food, homemaking, and befriending others.”

The loneliness, helplessness and boredom so often experienced by those living out the end of their lives in long-term care institutions should not be the norm in this country. We need innovative approaches, like The Green House model, which are built on the belief that every person, up until their last breath, should have the freedom to feel empowered and engaged in their life.


Dr. Bill Thomas and Beth Baker Discuss 7th Annual Green House Conference

By / Posted on August 28th, 2014

The theme of the 7th Annual Green House Meeting and Celebration this November in Memphis is Leading with Heart and Soul. We are excited to have both Dr. Bill Thomas and freelance journalist and author Beth Baker as our opening and closing plenary speakers, respectively. We caught up with Bill and Beth at The Pioneer Network’s 14th Annual Conference in Kansas City, Missouri to hear more about what Leading with Heart and Soul means to them.

“It means bringing passion into what you do, believing in it…” Dr. Thomas began, going on to say that we all have a moral imperative to help people find new ways to live in the community, including those living with frailty and dementia.

Beth agreed and added that leading with heart and soul is honoring a person’s desire for independence and autonomy as well as their need to balance this with strong relationships and connection to a greater community. For Beth this is what interdependence is all about and will be a key theme of her closing plenary.

“In Green House homes it is interdependence that defines the relationship between Shahbazim and Elders,” Dr. Thomas concluded. “People in each group need each other. Being a part of a community means that we need each other.”

Visit our Facebook page to see a video from this discussion and hear more from Bill and Beth at our Annual Meeting this November at The Peabody Memphis in TN. Green House adopters can register here: https://greenhouseproject.wufoo.com/forms/7th-annual-green-house-meeting-and-celebration/


Dr. Bill Thomas’ Second Wind Tour Kickoff

By / Posted on March 11th, 2014

Dr. Bill Thomas’ Second Wind Tour kicks off in three weeks. As a sponsor, THE GREEN HOUSE® Project is busy getting ready to revolutionize the national conversation around nursing homes, by bringing attention to our person-centered model with an emphasis on each person living a meaningful life. We are taking this message on the road and hitting 25 cities along the way!

Inspired by Thomas’ new book examining the baby boom generation’s reluctant generational second coming of age—“Second Wind: Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper and More Connected Life” (published by Simon and Schuster March 11 and named by Publisher’s Weekly as a Top 10 Social Science book of 2014)—the Second Wind Tour will visit 25 cities on a national bus tour from March 31-June 6, 2014.

Each half-day performance will be held in a premier theater with two acts. Act one will consist of five fast-paced theatrical monologues featuring a cast of speakers including Dr. Thomas, Susan Frazier or David Farrell of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, and renowned consumer health expert and TV personality Dr. Janet Taylor. The second act blends the illumination of the deep connections between music, identity, and memory in the form a “marvelous surprise” documentary film preview by director Michael Rossato-Bennett followed by a live musical performance by Musicians for World Harmony founder Samite Mulondo.

If you are interested in attending one of these performances, please visit the Second Wind Tour Website, http://secondwindtour.org/. If you are not near a tour stop or unable to attend, we still want you to be involved! Join the social media conversation by following The Green House Project, @GreenHouse_Proj, and the Second Wind Tour by using the hashtag #secondwindtour.

We are so grateful for the opportunity to spread the Green House vision across America!


Bill Thomas' Second Wind Tour– an inspired look at the future of aging, wellness and growth

By / Posted on February 13th, 2014

Dr. Bill Thomas, internationally recognized expert on aging and founder of The Green House model, is bringing a radical new approach to growth and aging through a national “non-fiction” theatrical tour produced in partnership with AARP’s Life Reimagined, Capital Impact Partners, and more than three dozen sponsor organizations, including THE GREEN HOUSE® Project.

Inspired by Thomas’ new book examining the baby boom generation’s reluctant generational second coming of age—“Second Wind:  Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper and More Connected Life” (named by Publisher’s Weekly as one of the Top 10 Social Science books of 2014)—the Second Wind Tour will bring a unique “non-fiction” theater experience blending the spoken word, innovative set design, film, and music to 25-cities in the spring of 2014.

“The Tour is really a companion to the book’s ‘second wind’ theme in that it challenges the conventional narrative of decline in mid-life and beyond,” Dr. Thomas said. “I want people to see, hear, feel, and connect to the power that arises from finding a ‘second wind’ in life.”Audiences will be taken on a holistic exploration that draws on a deep well of evidence-based approaches to growth, change, aging, health, and wellness. The goal of the tour is to start a new conversation that reframes “life after adulthood” as an exciting stage of human growth and development—a time for challenging received attitudes toward aging.

For more information about the tour and tickets, visit  The Second Wind Tour Website or contact Margaret Stansbury at The Green House Project, mstansbury@capitalimpact.org, 703-647-2311.

 

 

 

 

 


Happy New Year! THE GREEN HOUSE® Project has some special resolutions for 2014

By / Posted on December 31st, 2013

The beginning of a new year always brings a sense of excitement…a chance to reflect on our accomplishments…a chance to strategize about what improvements can be designed to further our mission or goals in life.  As I turned the day calendar on my desk this morning, I believe the message was perfect:  If we celebrate the years behind us they become stepping stones of strength and joy for the years ahead.

After celebrating our 10th Anniversary in 2013, The Green House Project team and our adopters are most anxious to start our 2nd decade off with a renewed energy to spread the good news about The Green House model and the high quality of care and service that it provides to Elders.

To attain that goal, we’ll certainly be “on the road” with our message at a number of conferences including Impact Texas, AHCA Independent Owners, Environments for Aging and a variety of LeadingAge state conferences including Aging Services of Minnesota in February.  It is especially exciting to speak in Minnesota because, in 2014 our first homes in that state will open in Mankato.

There is also a very special nationwide tour combining the talents of Dr. Bill Thomas, The Green House Project, and others in the works…but you’ll just have to wait to hear more about that in the coming months!

We are also resolving this year to further enhance our Green House workshops, Green House overview webinars and to provide that critical financial information through a series of webinars beginning in February.

We feel strongly that our Peer Network is a huge part of our value proposition.  This group has made significant strides over the past 12 months, and the outlook for 2014 is exciting.  A robust schedule of educational webinars, exclusive to Green House adopters, is already planned through the first quarter of the year. Organizations who have adopted this model, learn about a variety of topics and share best practices, not only with industry leaders, but with their peers.  We will work together to continuously enhance the opportunities to learn, grow and thrive as a movement.  

Our education programs are a critical element in making a successful Green House home, and we are committed to expanding and deepening this imperative offering. Through careful evaluations and Peer Network support, in 2014 we will begin working on additional modules of education for the leaders of our adopting organizations and for the new team members in Green House homes.

Of course with the generous support of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other partners we are working on a number of special projects.  Stay connected to our website, facebook and twitter to for the latest details!

They say that culture change is a journey without a destination, and at The Green House Project we embrace this concept.  Every year we resolve to learn more by working with all of you, to create a world where Elders are seen as creative, resourceful and whole.


Leading Age 2013, a Gathering of Innovators

By / Posted on November 8th, 2013

Recently, Green House Project team members had the stimuating opportunity to attend Leading Age’s 2013 Annual Meeting.  At this gathering of innovative organizations, leaders and vendors from around the country, The Green House model was highlighted on numerous occasions as setting the standard for the future of long term care.

Audrey Weiner, Green House adopter and exiting board chair for Leading Age, opened the conference in full style with bright red boots and a message of hope for the innovative leaders in the room.  The health care landscape is changing, and Ms. Weiner challenged the group to be the providers and organizations that will lead the charge to meet the needs of the field through innovation, strong data and compassion.  She quoted Dr. Bill Thomas, “There is a new old age waiting to be born and the culture change movement will be called upon to attend its birth.”

Throughout the conference, all of the hot topics were explored, from meeting the needs of people living with dementia, to health care reform and improving metrics such as decreasing rehospitalization.  Barry Berman, a wise leader of The Green House movement, and CEO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, received the Award of Honor, the highest award that Leading Age bestows upon its members.  Barry has made a difference to so many people through his years of service.  The elders, the staff and the people living with ALS and MS for whom he has created a world where life is worth living, created this video to share their gratitude.

The environment where elders live is very important to their well-being, especially for people who are living with dementia.  Person-Centered Design has come a long way over the last 10 years, from the medicalized institutions of yesterday, to small house models and beyond.  Dr. Bill Thomas was awarded the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Ten Year Award for the innovations and contributions that he has made to the field. In true visionary fashion, upon accepting the award, Dr. Thomas thanked everyone for the work that has been done, but challenged the crowd to think about, What’s next?

White Oaks Cottages at Fox Hill Village also won an AIA award for cutting edge design to serve people living with dementia.

 

It was a wonderful week in Dallas.  The energy was palpable with a feeling that the providers in those hallways are the ones that will change the world, and that there must be a strong shift to person-centered living in order to meet the needs of the changing demographic of elders.  The Green House model is a strong and proven force for innovation and quality.

Click here to view photos from the reception that we hosted with other culture change leaders.  It is through the providers and leaders of this movement that we will be one of the solutions that will take us into the future.