Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies for 12 Green House Homes at John Knox Village in Florida – A Special Celebration!

By / Posted on June 17th, 2016

Grand opening festivities took place in late May and included Elders, staff, aging services professionals along with a host of local and state officials.   JKV Ribbon Cutting_grand opening_may 26 2016This $34 million project was truly the result of elders voicing their desire to see Green House homes on their campus that serves 900 John Knox residents in Pompano Beach, Florida.  “The Woodlands is the first Green House to be initiated by resident involvement,” said Nancy Lee Matthews, one of several John Knox Village residents sharing input when the project was being planned. “It was us, the residents, who initially researched The Green House and presented the information to administration and the board of directors.”

gerry at podiumPresident and CEO of John Knox Village, Gerry Stryker, welcomed those attending the event and definitely agrees that residents were a critical link in the project.  “This is an incredibly emotional and fulfilling time for John Knox Village as we celebrate the culmination of our vision – to change the face of care and rehabilitation services in South Florida.  JKV kids with susan and dr bill Gerry May 26 2016Our residents’ dedication and determination has fostered an incredible sense of community – a home where families and elders will come together and set a new progressive standard for healing as set forth in The Green House Project model.”

The Woodlands is a total of 7 floors…the main floor has a common area and the remaining six floors each have two Green House homes with 12 privateExterior of new JKV with 12 homes May 26 2016 bedrooms and bathrooms surrounding a hearth area, open kitchen and dining area.  Four of the homes will be dedicated to short term rehabilitation.

Senior Director of The Green House Project, Susan Ryan, was asked to spend additional time on campus to meet with medical professionals and Elders to share her insight into the Green House model.  She met with susan with doctors at JKV may 25 pic 2physicians involved with care at John Knox Village, specifically those with Elders who will be receiving rehabilitation services in the homes. She also met with Sages that will be working in the homes.  Sages act as an advisor and facilitator for the Shahbazim, the self-managed work team.  In addition to Susan, Green House Project Guide, Debbie Wiegand met with the2016 Sages at JKV May 2016 group to answer questions and share their appreciation for the work they will do in the homes.
A Sage is a volunteer and someone that has demonstrated wisdom and good communication skills. We are grateful for the work they will perform and wish them much success in the days and months ahead!

jkv fireplace hearth areaThe Woodlands at John Knox Village was designed by RDG Planning & Design (Architects John Birge, Scott Pfeifer and Kevin Ruff). The Weitz Company served as the construction manager, and William Gallo, of Gallo Herbert Architects, worked with John Knox Village asjkv chair interior shot may 26 2016_flipped the Owner’s Authorization Representative.

Click here to read more about The Woodlands.


Deadline Extended by CMS for Comments on LTC Regulation Changes

By / Posted on September 15th, 2015

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via: McKnight’s

If you thought you would not have enough time to offer your input on the long-term care regulation reform rule you have just been given another 30 days!

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have extended the comment period until October 14, 2015.

If you are a Green House adopter or an advocate for culture change it’s important we share our vision and core values to change long term care in our country.  The last time regulations were written was 1991!

 Culture change advocate, Carmen Bowman who was a Colorado state surveyor for nine years and  policy analyst with CMS Central Office, strongly urges everyone to make sure their voice is heard on the proposed changes.  Carmen, who now is a consultant, trainer, author and owner of Edu-Catering said “As representatives of the culture change movement, what a grand opportunity we all have to encourage CMS to make some changes–to especially look at language.”  She went on to say there are many other culture change practices that advocates may want to urge CMS to include in these new regulations.

Let’s make sure our thoughts and concerns are part of the process!

Click here to read more about the announcement


Pioneer Network Highlights The Green House Project as Thought Leader

By / Posted on August 6th, 2015

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Rhonda Wolpert, Rob Simonetti and Debbie Wiegand share Design Lessons Learned

The Green House Project was highlighted as an innovator and thought leader during the 2015 Pioneer Network Conference.  The Pioneer Network is a convener of organizations who are moving away from institutional models of long term care to more consumer-driven models that embrace flexibility, self-determination and a belief that elders are meant to thrive.  During the stimulating days of educational sessions, representatives from the national Green House initiative, and Green House organizations from around the country spoke on various topics to help move the field forward.

Debbie Wiegand, Rhonda Wolpert and Rob Simonetti shared design lessons learned in their session, “Build This, Not That, Lessons Learned from a Decade of Green House Experience.”   Since the first home opened in 2003, there have been variations in layout and design. Through a formal Design Survey, The Green House Project asked every Green House adopter what works and what doesn’t for building design and regulatory challenges, and what strategies worked to overcome perceived regulatory code barriers. Also, insights from newly completed THRIVE research help us understand how the design contributes to sustainability, from operating cost and quality of care perspectives. Listen to this webinar that Debbie and Rob did to help those interested in changing the paradigm of long term care, build environments that support a new way of life.

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Cheryl VanBemden, Marla DeVries, and Susan Frazier take us into the “black box” or Green House

Susan Frazier, Marla DeVries and Cheryl Van Bemden took audience members “Into The Black Box of Green House homes”.  Here they talked about the impact of decision making to reinforce or erode culture change. Utilizing new insights from The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE), a collaborative of top researchers created to learn more about what contributes to higher quality in nursing homes, this session explored the factors impacting problem-solving in long-term care organizations that lead to reinforcement or erosion of an empowered workforce, and person-centered models. Participants explored the four factors that the research determined to most greatly impact sustainability, while discovering organizational strengths and growth opportunities to create a slip-resistant change.

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Tammy Marshall, Mirian Levi and Lori Grossman from Jewish Home Lifecare

Tammy Marshall, Lori Grossman and Miriam Levi shared their experience of implementing person-centered care principles across Jewish Home Lifecare, a large organization with multiple sites.  Tammy Marshall facilitated a second session with Sonya Barsness.  They spoke about the importance of research to support “culture change” and “person-centered care.” They shared research that is being done at Jewish Home Lifecare, and how others can access research, translate it to those who need it most, and identify opportunities for additional research.

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Marla DeVries speaking about Research and Sustainability

Finally, the team from Lutheran Homes of Oshkosh shared a special session called, “Honoring the Spirit Within Through Namaste Care: An End-of-Life Program for Persons with Dementia”.  Namaste Care takes its name from the Hindu word meaning “to honor the spirit within.” The program was developed for elders with advanced dementia and strives to maintain their highest quality of life. It includes simple and practical ways for care partners to create opportunities for connection, meaning, and joy.

This conference is always an energy boost, knowing that the movement to transform long term care, and what it means to age, is growing, evolving and gaining momentum.  The Green House Project is honored to be a leader of culture change and will continue to pursue evidence based excellence, that is based in deep knowing relationships, meaningful life and empowerment for all.

 

 

 

 


St. John’s, Delivering the Highest Quality at the Best Cost

By / Posted on July 15th, 2015

Rebecca Priest engages with elders at the Penfield Green House homes

Rebecca Priest engages with elders at the Penfield Green House homes

Rebecca Priest, Chief Operating Officer, and Jim Clark, Chief Financial Officer, of St. John’s homes in Rochester, NY share their Green House journey through the lens of delivering financial success to their organization and value to their customer. In the webinar St. John’s Journey: Providing the Best Quality of Care at the Lowest Operating Cost, Rebecca and Jim encourage listeners to “rethink all that you think you know” in order to provide the most incredible, elder engaged service at the best value in Green House homes.

Jim Clark, VP and CFO identifies that financial stability “is the side effect of doing things right.” Specifically, elder growth and well-being through positive clinical outcomes in addition to successful employees through retention and labor costs results in financial stability in two forms; revenue and predictability.

Listen to the webinar here: http://impact.adobeconnect.com/p93l2594uu2/


CARE: Dedicated to Improving How We Age

By / Posted on May 7th, 2015

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing created the Center for Aging Research and Education (CARE) in response to the rapidly expanding care needs of our aging population. The center works toward transformation by using “…nursing leadership, discovery, education, and practice…” to support happiness, health and security for all older adults.

In a recent online post by the CARE team entitled, “What Makes a Green House Home? How You Decide Matters,” the author considers the persistence and commitment necessary to take the philosophical tenets of culture change and put them into practice.

The post describes how UW-Madison School of Nursing Associate Dean Barb Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN and research manager Kim Nolet, MS have conducted research that analyzes the “lived experience” that the Green House model now has after more than 10 years as the pinnacle of culture change.

“By interviewing 166 staff members at 11 Green House homes, Bowers and Nolet identified patterns of problem solving as important to the erosion or reinforcement of the Green House model over time.”

The researchers found that along with the architecture of the Green House home, it is collaboration across the organization and between nurses and Shahbazim that allows the significant benefits of this model to be realized.

Both Bowers and Nolet are a part of The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE). Interested in learning more about the THRIVE initiative? Take a look at this recent blog post which discusses the importance of the soon to be published THRIVE research results.

 

 

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Dr. Bill Thomas, Talks to Provider Magazine about Person-Centered Care

By / Posted on April 13th, 2015

In an exclusive interview with Provider, Dr. Thomas casts the vision of living in a world where the ageist slur, “elderly” is no longer a part of polite conversation.  He says, “Think back in memory to the last time an older person referred to themselves as ‘elderly.’ People don’t introduce themselves by saying, ‘Hi, I’m Bob’s elderly mother.’ That’s put onto them. That’s the definition of a slur.”  Dr. Bill Thomas believes that to change long term care, we need to change the larger societal attitudes toward getting old.

In pursuit of this reality, Dr. Thomas is hitting the road for the Age of Disruption Tour, “I’m going on tour again, starting in April,” [Dr. Bill Thomas] tells Provider. “I feel a responsibility to have an impact on not just long term care, but how our country views aging and how our country thinks about older people. I think that many of the issues we deal with in long term care are driven by deep, cultural misunderstandings about aging.”  Part of the tour will be an old-fashioned rap session, with Thomas sitting down with leaders, that “explores new ideas, practices, and models to transform the experience of care and caregiving,” the tour’s ad copy says.

While there have been great strides to create opportunities for elders to live a life worth living, we have a long way to go… and there is always the danger of a good idea being turned into a marketing gimic, rather than the real deal.  Take “person-centered care” for an example, “The problem with person-centered care,” Thomas says, “is that it’s possible for people to become satisfied with the name and to actually lose interest in the hard work that’s required to turn the name into a lived experience. The words are everywhere, but the meaning of the words is changing… What we really mean by person-centered care is relationship-rich care.”

In The Green House model, relationships are the cornerstone of success.  The deep knowing relationships between elders and the direct care staff facilitates a familiarity that leads to positive outcomes, including increased workflow, cost savings, and health outcomes.

Dr. Thomas has truly made an impact on the field of aging, as the reporter says, “he is a founding father of a revolution. (How many other Birkenstock-wearing gerontologists are getting shout-outs from the Senate floor?)”  As he embarks on this latest adventure, there will be new ideas shared, fires stoked, and people moved to action… bringing us ever closer to the ideal of meaningful lives for all.

To read the full article >>


"Expect the Best!"

By / Posted on January 15th, 2015

My work often brings to mind my good friend and mentor, Nancy Fox. Nancy is Chief Life Enhancement Officer for Vivage in Colorado, was the first Executive Director of The Eden Alternative™, and has many years’ experience as an administrator and an educator. The lessons she has taught me pop into my head on many occasions.

In 2007, Nancy wrote a book called Journey of a Lifetime: Leadership Pathways to Culture Change in Long-Term Care (available at www.edenalt.org or online booksellers). The book lists ten important principles for enlightened leadership, illustrated by stories of good and not-so-good experiences she has had, and lessons learned. One of these is called “Expect the Best,” a principle that is ignored with alarming regularity in long-term care, on both the provider and the regulator sides.

Here is an example of each:

First, a recent McKnight’s article described a study in the upcoming issue of Geriatric Nursing that can only be described as what my friend Jane Verity would call “a blinding flash of the obvious.” This study of nursing homes in the US and Germany showed that CNAs had a much better work experience if they were notified of the deaths of their elders before discovering it for themselves (such as walking into a room to provide care and finding an empty bed). The study recommended “more mindful” approaches to such transitions for those who have formed close, caring relationships.

Wow. What’s sad about this study—even the need to conduct such a study!—is that it reveals how often we give lip service to honoring our hands-on care partners, but choose actions that say the opposite. Then we are quick to blame those same people for lack of a “work ethic.”

Look at your employee handbook and ask yourself, does this document expect the best of our employees? Does it treat them as responsible adults or as children (or worse yet, as potential criminals)? Then look at the actions and interactions of leaders and managers throughout the day. Are our care partners included in decision-making discussions? Do we ever ask for their opinions or advice?

Expecting the best creates two complementary results—it improves people’s abilities and their accountability. Nancy frequently says that “empowerment is not something you try; it is something you do.” When we approach those who support our elders with an expectation that they are capable of great wisdom and growth, we create an environment where growth can occur and wisdom will blossom. And by treating people as equals, we create an environment where people care about each other and about the consequences of their actions, and accountability thrives.

Such discussions raise the inevitable objection that there are people who will take advantage of your good intentions and try to game the system. Welcome to the planet Earth. The problem not that such people exist; the problem is that we write our policies and choose our actions based on the worst person we can imagine and punish everyone else with our low expectations, rather than addressing (or removing) the individual in question. Nancy would likely say, “Expect the best, (and individually address the worst).”

The second example was raised by Karen Schoeneman, formerly of CMS, in a recent culture change discussion that highlights this issue on the regulatory side. She was upset to hear that surveyors in her home state were not permitting elders to have refrigerators in their rooms because of the concern that a resident with diabetes could potentially enter the room and take something that would not be good for his/her diet.

There is so much wrong with that citation that I could devote an entire post to it. But let’s stick with “Expect the Best,” as it applies to surveyors. The fundamental flaw in our regulatory system, I believe, is that surveyors inhabit a primary identity as enforcers, rather than educators. Therefore, they come into the nursing home expecting the worst and constantly imagining “What could possibly go wrong?”

(Of course, Nancy added her two cents to the discussion thread as only she can do, suggesting that perhaps “surveyors shouldn’t be allowed to drive, because they might hit a diabetic.” If it’s possible to laugh and cry at the same time, that’s what I did when I read her comment.)

Incidentally—to be fair to surveyors—many of them work in states where they are required to be enforcers only, because the rules say that they cannot advise providers, only tell them if what they are doing is “in compliance” or not. Apparently the concern is that surveyors might lose their objectivity if they try to mentor the homes. And apparently the rule makers have never heard of school teachers, who mentor their students every day and still give them quarterly grades. If the regulatory bosses don’t expect the best of their surveyors, then a trickle-down effect at survey time is entirely predictable.

These are two examples of why I sometimes despair that our current system of elder care will never truly create well-being for anyone. There is far too much talk about “culture change” and too little evidence of it. Nancy Fox is one person who has always walked the talk. We would all do well to read, or re-read, Nancy’s book.


Kiplinger Highlights Green House Homes

By / Posted on December 2nd, 2014

While those of us who work with Elders in Green House homes know what a wonderful place it is…it’s always nice when the model is included in an article for a national financial organization.

Kiplinger’s Retirement Planning 2014 booklet includes information on finding the right nursing home, and this month an article includes information on culture change advocates including The Green House model.  Here is an excerpt from the article:

Rather than making incremental changes, some culture-change advocates are starting from scratch. The Green House Project, for example, builds skilled-nursing facilities that house about 10 residents around an open kitchen. Each resident has a private room with a private bath. There are no nursing stations, room numbers, call bells or medication carts, says David Farrell, senior director of the Green House Project. Each Green House is “built from the ground up to look and feel like a real home,” Farrell says.

Click here to read the entire article including information about culture change and nursing homes.


Thought Leaders in Aging Gather at the 2014 Pioneer Network Conference: THE GREEN HOUSE® Project Leadership Among Those Presenting

By / Posted on September 4th, 2014

“Journey to the Heartland” was the theme for the 2014 Pioneer Network Conference held last month, and many indeed made the journey!  Over 1,200 people made the trip to Kansas City for a chance to network and learn with others who are deeply committed to the cultural transformation of long term care.  The Green House Project is a true trailblazer in this movement and we are strong supporters of the conference.  Green House team members, David Farrell and Susan Frazier were presenters at two different sessions during this national event.

Nurses have a critical role to play in supporting deep transformation within aging services.
“Nurses Building Relationships for Organizational Transformation” was a session co-led by Susan and former Green House team member, Anna Ortigara who is now with PHI.  Both Susan and Anna are nurses and can speak first-hand about nurses engaged in culture change.  The session discussed the need to build effective communication strategies that will engage both the Elders and direct care staff members.  The discussion also explored how nurses as leaders, partners, gerontological specialists and teachers are faced with many more opportunities to enhance quality of life and quality of care.   The Green House model is designed to support Clinical Support Team Members, which includes nurses, in developing partnerships with individuals and self-managed work teams.

“THE GREEN HOUSE Model –Delivering Quality of Life and Bottom Line Results” was the special research session delivered by David to attendees.  He confronted the myth that The Green House model is not viable—with over 150 Green House homes operating in 25 states, the innovators who adopted the model are happy with their consumer satisfaction and their bottom lines.  David shared data from operating Green House homes that demonstrates an excellent return on their investment, and their decision to build even more Green House homes.  He told the group that Green House homes are delivering the results that Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in health care reform are looking for today.

 


THRIVE: Understanding the Language of Research

By / Posted on June 30th, 2014

The Green House Project has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) collaborative to learn more about the Green House model as well as other models of care. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the THRIVE team is conducting a series of interrelated research projects that together will comprise the largest research effort undertaken to date in Green House homes. Each quarter, a member of the THRIVE team will contribute a blog post to the Green House Project website.

As the THRIVE research projects head toward completion later this year, our research team has developed plans to share our research findings.  In addition to publishing articles in a special issue of the journal, Health Services Research, we also will share findings through conference and webinar presentations and blog posts.

Because some commonly used research terms may sound like jibberish to non-researchers (after all, who really knows what a p-value is?), we will devote our next few blog posts to explaining a few terms that will help non-researchers better understand the THRIVE articles, presentations, and posts.  We’ll start by reviewing Quantitative and Qualitative research designs.

When people think of research, they’re usually thinking of a Quantitative research design, which essentially measures and compares things.  Quantitative research asks questions like “How many residents in one nursing home have falls compared to residents in another?” or “Does providing one type of care work better than providing a different type of care?”  A quantitative research design allows a researcher to establish “how much”, whether one thing is related to another (such as whether falls are less frequent when certain care is provided), and also – depending on the details of the design – to establish cause and effect.  The data collected are usually in numerical form, and findings are expressed in terms including percents, means, and p-values (to answer the earlier question, a p-value denotes whether or not a number is or isn’t significantly ‘different’ from another…..we’ll come back to this in a future blog post).

Qualitative research designs essentially answer “how” and “why”.  Qualitative research asks questions such as “Why are so many falls occurring?” or “What conditions are necessary for a nursing home to provide a certain type of care?”  A qualitative research design permits a researcher to better understand events and the circumstances under which they occur and vary.  The information gathered in these types of studies are usually textual, and include the researchers notes and observations, as well as in-depth interviews and quotes from people who have knowledge of the event being studied.  This information is analyzed by looking for common themes across all of the information collected and reporting these findings – often contextualized using exemplative quotes.

The THRIVE team is using both quantitative and qualitative methods in their research, which is considered mixed-methods.  This is the best of both worlds, and is allowing us to answer questions such as:

Quantitative:    What was the annual turnover rate for shahbazim over the past two years?
Was this turnover rate statistically different (higher or lower) than that found
among CNAs in other nursing homes?

Qualitative:      What was the role of the Director of Nursing in the Green House homes?
How might variations in this role relate to shahbazim turnover?

Stay tuned for the next THRIVE blog post.  In the meantime, if you have questions about this post, or suggestions for future ones, please let us know.

Questions about THRIVE can be directed to Lauren Cohen (lauren_cohen@unc.edu or 919-843-8874).


National Nursing Home Week® 2014 Success Stories

By / Posted on June 9th, 2014

Green House adopters and enthusiasts across the country came together last month during National Nursing Home Week to educate their local communities and policymakers about The Green House difference. This year, the American Health Care Association used the Hawaiian theme, “Living the Aloha Spirit,” for the week. The Green House model’s core values of Meaningful Life, Empowered Staff, and Real Home, aligned closely with this year’s theme and we were excited to invite communities across the country to see the difference that our model offers for elders and their families.

Here are just some of our success stories from that week:

  • From February 2014 to today, we have gained 220 followers on Twitter totaling 1,635
  • From April 2014 to today, we have received 73 new likes on Facebook totaling 2,483
  • Two templates were added to our Support the Movement page
    • Sample Letter to the Editor
    • Sample Letter to a Policymaker
  • Editorial from the Guide at The Green House Homes at VA Illiana Health Care System in Danville, IL was printed in two local papers
  • The Guide with the Green House homes at Mirasol in Lakewood, CO wrote an editorial
  • Three policymakers site visits occurred in conjunction with National Nursing Home Week:
  • Photos like the one you see above from St. Martin’s in the Pines in Birmingham, AL were shared and added to our Flickr account

A big thank you to all who participated!

Want to learn more? Visit our Support the Movement page and use our policymaker site visit letter and editorial sample and share these tools with your Green House home friends and colleagues.

Contact Meaghan McMahon at (mmcmahon@capitalimpact.org) with your questions or comments.


Sr. Director of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, David Farrell, Honored by California Medical Organization

By / Posted on June 7th, 2014

Citing his extensive work in transforming long-term care in California, the California Association of Long Term Care Medicine (CALTCM), honored our own Sr. Director, David Farrell with their 2014 Leadership Award.

CALTCM is the professional organization for California physicians, medical directors, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, and other professionals working in long-term care.  CALTCM is the state chapter of the American Medical Directors Association (AMDA).  It is an organization that advocates quality patient healthcare, provides long-term care education and seeks to influence policy within the industry.

The Leadership Award presentation took place at the CALTCM 40th Annual Meeting for group.  Prior to joining The Green House Project, David served as a nursing home administrator and regional director of operations in California.  As many of you know, David has long been a strong advocate for person-directed care and culture change within long-term care.

Click here to read the full announcement.

We congratulate David on receiving this award!