The Evolution and Impact of The Green House model: Interview with Journalist and Author, Beth Baker

By / Posted on January 30th, 2017

Beth Baker, Journalist

There are 214 Green House homes, however there are 15,600 traditional nursing homes in our country.  As we work to transform long term care, Beth Baker has been a critical voice in journalism, describing innovations in the field.  She has spent the last decade telling the story of culture change to a wide audience and earlier this month, Beth Baker highlighted The Green House model as The Nursing Home of the Future, in Politico Magazine.  

As a journalist and author, Beth Baker, writes about healthcare in outlets like The Washington Post and the AARP Bulletin, describing what is possible in long term care,”What [The Green House Project] does is to demonstrate that people can keep living and enjoying life until their last breath given the right environment and relationships.”  This journey led her to Tupelo, the first Green House homes, and the transformative story of Mildred Adams:

Beth became intrigued by the rich human stories found throughout the culture change world, and eventually decided to write a book, Old Age in A New Age.  Her work has expanded,  in a second book, With A Little Help From Our Friends, that focuses on “the importance of community and social connection as we grow older.”  Beth sees boundless opportunities to write about people who are,”looking at aging in our society and thinking about how to make it a richer and more respected time of life.”

When Politico approached Beth, they asked her to write a visionary piece about the nursing home of the future… when Beth pitched The Green House model, they were delighted to see the potential that exists today to create meaningful lives for those who live and work in long term care.

In her reporting for the Politico article, Beth visited Lebanon Valley Brethren Home in Palmyra, PA.  After a three hour drive on a cold, rainy day she shared how warm and welcoming it was to ring the doorbell and walk into the home, ” there was a fire in the hearth and one of the women was doing a jigsaw puzzle… it felt so familiar and was just a reminder of why [The Green House] is such a wonderful model”.  Through interviews with elders and Lebanon Valley Brethren Home CEO, Jeff Shireman, Beth was able to convey the comprehensive nature of the model, and how the interplay of the environment, organizational redesign and philosophy work together to create positive clinical, financial and satisfaction outcomes, “Having a strong case for the finances and business outcomes of The Green House Project has been really important, ” remarks Baker.

Beth Baker’s credible voice shines light on the potential for aging to be different, and it is so important that we continue, because as Beth shares, we have a lot of work to do, ” … It is going to take a culture change beyond long term care… [we need] a change in how we view aging, to get people to accept that it doesn’t have to be the way that it has always been.”

To read the full Politico Article>> 

 

 


‘The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly’ and The Green House model: An Innovative and Cost-Effective Partnership for Comprehensive Care

By / Posted on January 23rd, 2017

Lori Gonzalez is a PhD researcher at the Claude Pepper Center of Florida State University who studies alternatives to traditional nursing care and social inequality.

The first Green House homes included in a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) partnership will open in early February, joining together two of the nation’s most promising long-term care models.  The Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Green House homes, located in the Thome Rivertown Neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan will serve approximately 21 lower-income older adults who are otherwise able to live safely in the community, but who are currently residing in skilled nursing facilities.  According to Capital Impact Partners, serving these older adults in Green House homes with the support of PACE, compared to providing care in a traditional nursing facility, is expected to save the state’s Medicaid system about $130,000 per year.

PACE began in California in the 1970s as an alternative to institutional long-term care.  A group of Chinese, Italian, Filipino, and other immigrants held cultural views about caring for their loved ones that departed from the larger culture of aging in nursing homes.  They formed “On Lok” meaning peaceful, happy abode.   By 1986, On Lok developed the nation’s first comprehensive model of coordinated care and by 1997, the program became a permanent provider under Medicare and a state option under Medicaid.  Today, PACE operates 116 programs in 32 states and serves over 30,000 older adults, most of whom are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid.  PACE operates with the belief that, “it is better for the well-being of seniors with chronic care needs and their families to be served in the community whenever possible.”  With the assistance of the PACE program, 90% of participants who might otherwise enter a nursing home are able to live in the community.

PACE provides comprehensive care to those who are eligible for the program.  PACE eligibility includes being 55 or older, certified by the state to need a nursing home level of care, residing near a PACE care center, and having the ability to live safely in the community. When an individual enrolls in PACE, they (and their family) meet with a team of care professionals including social workers, nurses, primary care physicians, and nutritionists to help craft a plan to serve an elder in the community.  PACE participants visit a PACE care center routinely where they, depending on their plan of care, might receive a flu shot, dialysis, dental care, respite care, a hot meal, physical therapy, transportation, or participate in social activities.  Family members who visit the center receive counseling or advice on how to care for their loved one.

Green House homes also provide quality care and quality of life, but in a residential setting.  In Green House homes, “elders and others enjoy excellent quality of life and quality of care; where they, their families and the staff engage in meaningful relationships…” and when licensed as ALFs, they provide a community-residential setting for elders that is expected to exceed the quality provided by other ALF models.  Green House homes are not just homelike, they are places where elders call home.

The goals and values supported by PACE and The Green House model are similar and their partnership will honor elders’ preferences to avoid a nursing home and to live in the least restrictive care setting possible. Green House homes provide high quality residential living and PACE provides the physical health, mental health, social health, and family support for both acute care needs and long-term care needs.  Furthermore, PACE and Green House value the belief that all elders should have access to quality care and a good quality of life. PACE serves mostly dual eligible, frail elders and Green House homes are meant to be available to all, regardless of income or wealth.  The Green Houses at Rivertown Neighborhood, along with PACE will support these values by serving 21 low-income elders.

Aging in place is highly desired by older adults, but sometimes financially out of reach.  The Thome Rivertown model demonstrates that creating a Continuing Care Retirement Community for lower income individuals is possible and that when PACE and Green House are integrated into that community, high quality, cost-effective care is achievable.


Electric Energy Takes Green House Adopters Beyond Better!

By / Posted on November 30th, 2016

The energy is always electric when Green House adopters are together. “As a national initiative, amazing things happen when so many changemakers are in the same room,”  shares Senior Director, Susan Ryan, “The opportunity for rich discussion, relationship building and thoughtful questions is irreplaceable. ”   That was certainly the case as over 250 Green House adopters gathered at The 2016 Green House Annual Meeting—Beyond Better.tshirt-shot_web

visit to Green HillHosted in New Jersey, attendees were able to visit two open Green House homes, Morris Hall Meadows and Green Hill.  Representing 30 states and over 200 open homes, the growing Peer Network is one of the greatest values of participating in this initiative.  Green House stakeholder, John Grace, said, “It was nice to attend an intimate gathering where “practical application” is the theme of the day.”

Pre-Conference workshops provided role specific opportunities to explore areas that research proves are vital to the sustainability and success of the model, such as coaching and empowerment.  Senior executives joined President of Center for Innovation, Inc., the sponsor of The Green House Project,  Scott Townsley, to discuss the strategic trends impacting healthcare, and how The Green House model must continue to evolve in order to lead the way to a better tomorrow.

Marc Middleton, CEO of Growing Bolder, opened the meeting with an inspiring message that what the mind believes, the body embraces, and a call to belimarc-middleton_webeve in the potential of elders!  This multimedia presentation thoroughly dismantled the myths of aging, and set a tone of possibility for the rest of the meeting.

With breakout sessions focused on key operational topics like convivium, spirituality, team building and hiring, adopters left the conference with a full ‘toolbox’ of new skills and ideas to eni-am-green-house_webhance their homes and organizations.  An original spoken word piece, called, “I Am Green House”, brought the crowd to their feet, as a shahbaz, a nurse, a family member and an elder shared what it really means to live this movement everyday.

This year, intensive sessions were offered as opportunities to take a  deep dive in areas of dementia, coaching leadership and bringing Green House values into the legacy home.   Hot topics, real discussion, and an impetus to keep wali_question_webgrowing, resonated throughout the conference. The “Inner Circle” was a unique networking space for attendees to meet their peers and help to co-create the future.  Reciprocity of active learning and shared experience is making a difference and changing the world.

Sustainability is crucial in the work that we do, and a quality benchmarking resource was presented to attendees with a tangible charge to never stop improving.  Exciting results are being discovered as the evidence-base for The Green House model grows.

The conference closed with Ashton Applewhite, anti-ageism advocate and author of This Chair Rocks, an Manifesto Against Ageism, sending a passionate appeal to fight ageism in all its forms.  With humor and personal stories, Ashton served as the perfect way to end the conference feeling challenged and  inspired.

susan-speaking_web“THE POWER OF THE MOVEMENT IS YOU!” says, Susan Ryan, to an empowered audience of Green House adopters.  The national initiative is able to push the envelope of what is possible because of the innovative and excellent work of Green House adopters and those stakeholders who are changing what it means to age.

Next year marks the 10th Annual Green House Meeting.  Held in Florida, with host site, John Knox Village, this meeting continues to grow in meaning and scope, as Green House adopters truly go, Beyond Better!

 


Naming Ceremony Carries Special Meaning for Missouri Green House homes

By / Posted on August 19th, 2016

cottages_logo_finalOur family strives to to do meaningful things together and our decision to open Missouri’s first Green House homes, Cottages of Lake St Louis, has been the ultimate endeavor in camaraderie.  These six, skilled nursing homes of 10 elders each, will be built on a beautiful site in suburban St Louis.  When it came to naming the cottages, my husband, Al, and I hit upon an idea that we feel, really speaks to the ideals that we are trying to provide for our elders and our family.

We believe that it is important to build relationships across the generations, and to value the gifts within each of us.  In this spirit, we chose to name each cottage after one of our five grandchildren and the 6th cottage to honor the late mother of our Director of Development, and long time team member.  I brought paint samples to them and had each choose their favorite color and had signage made up for the cottage porches proclaiming the names.DSC_0229                                                                                                                             At the groundbreaking ceremony in July, we surprised the grandchildren as we unveiled the cottage names.  They were thrilled, and to further include them, we will paint the front door of “their” cottage using the color that they chose!  We expect them to be involved regularly in the activity of their cottage and will be well known to their elders and families.

Cottages of Lake St Louis is a place for OUR family and for ELDERS.  We are so proud to have been able to move forward on such a wonderful project with:

  • Ava’s Cottage
  • Ella’s Cottage
  • Grace’s Cottage
  • Harper’s Cottage
  • Kris’s Cottage
  • Betty’s Cottage


The Green House Project Reaches Important Milestone

By / Posted on August 9th, 2016

 

Over 200 Green House Homes Now Open in 30 States 

BALTIMORE, MD (August 9, 2016)– THE GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT has spent over a decade creating a new vision for the future of elder care. In June, the organization reported an important milestone: more than 200 Green House homes are being operated by leading organizations in 30 states.

Upon reaching this new milestone, Green House Senior Director, Susan Ryan says, “It is beyond exciting to see this initiative gaining momentum.  It took us 10 years to reach the first 100 homes, and only five years to add the next 100.  As our numbers continue to grow, it means that more people are able to live full and meaningful lives.  Both the elders who live in Green House homes and those who work there, benefit from the elements of the model that returns value and autonomy to those who it matters to most.“

Exterior of new JKV with 12 homes May 26 2016John Knox Village, a lifecare community in Pompano Beach, Fl represents the 200th Green House home to open.  In May 2016, they opened 12 Green House homes.  Says CEO, Gerry Stryker, of the momentous occasion, “Being the 200th Green House home is incredibly emotional and fulfilling for John Knox Village.  We recognize that we are a part of a rapidly growing national movement to change the face of care and rehabilitation.  Our elders deserve this.”

kitchen_cedar sinaiCedar Sinai Park, in Portland, OR, opened the first of four Green House homes in July, representing the thirtieth state to include this lifestyle model.  Sandra Simon, CEO said, “This is the future of aging services, and we are proud to create the first Green House home in Oregon.”

Research  finds that comprehensive adoption of the model has the potential to impact re-hospitalization rates, end of life care, and the quality of decisions made in the homes.  A strong evidence base makes this model an appealing option to consumers, policymakers and long-term care providers and increases potential for scaling.

The Green House concept has already spread nationwide, with Green House projects operating or in development in 34 states.  The organization’s goal is to increase the pace of growth, and have at least 300 homes open by 2020.

About The Green House Project

Based in Baltimore, MD, The Green House Project promotes an alternative to the traditional institutional skilled nursing, replacing it with an innovative new model of care that balances quality of life with quality of care.  In the Green House model, large nursing facilities are replaced with small, self-contained homes that include private bedrooms and baths, home-cooked meals and access to the outdoors, while meeting all skilled nursing regulatory and reimbursement criteria.  Incorporating the core values of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff, the Green House model creates a higher quality of life, improved medical outcomes, and greater caregiver satisfaction.  There are currently more than 200 Green House homes in 30 states.  The Green House Project is an initiative within the newly formed Center for Innovation. Visit our website at www.thegreenhouseproject.org.


Living the Good Life: Dr. Lemuel Rogers

By / Posted on July 5th, 2016

Living

 

“Living the good life” is a blog series celebrating the lives of people living with dementia in Green House homes.  In Green House homes across the country, elders are creative, resourceful and whole people who have a valuable story to share.

Dr. Lemuel Rogers

“Without connections to the world that nurtures our human spirit, we hasten decline” -Susan Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project
dr r portraitOur lives are a rich tapestry of interests and experiences, woven together across time.  Sharing and celebrating our unique stories ensures that our personhood is preserved, even as our needs change.  Dr. Lemuel Rogers, was the epitome of dignity; a dapper, intelligent man with a great smile and beautiful singing voice.  He was well known in the community as a respected doctor, and leader of his church.  Meaningful life is a core value of The Green House model.  The means that a person must be deeply known, and have the power to maintain their identity through connections and engagement.

For Dr. Rogers, that meant being respected and acknowledged for the expertise and reputation that took a lifetime to build.  In the home, he preferred to be called “Doctor”, and frequently perused medical journals with former St. John’s medical director, Al Power.  Staying connected to the community that he loved, shahbazim (care staff) supported Dr. Rogers to attend the annual African-American Health Symposium, a church event dr r fraternitydedicated to him and his wife, Gloria.  Being honored for one’s gifts is essential to living the good life.

Work hard, play hard.  Dr. Rogers was also an active member in his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi. His fraternity brothers were frequent visitors at The Green House homes, bringing joy and beautiful music. Dr Roger’s loved to sing and was able to share his talents with others in his home.  See the below video of Dr. Rogers singing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”.

 

Often, those living with dementia become known solely by their diagnosis.  The beautiful tapestry gets lost amidst the behaviors and medications. In a Green House home, however, the value is placed on WHO that person is, and WHAT will support them in living the good life.  Dr. Rogers was serious, but had a great sense of humor.  dr. r group shotYou really felt like you’d done something special when you made him laugh. When children would come to visit, he would shake their hands very formally when he met them and they loved it. His dementia was pretty advanced by the time he moved to The Green House home, but when a doctor talked with him, or his church or fraternity visited, he always sat up a little straighter, shone a little brighter, and rose to the occasion in conversation. The man just…exuded dignity.

 


Portrait of a Green House Leader, Joyce Ebmeier

By / Posted on January 29th, 2016

What Does it Mean to Lead Meaningful and Sustainable Change

The “Portrait of a Green House Leader” webinar series continues by highlighting the talents of Joyce Ebmeier, Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning for Tabitha Health Care Services in Lincoln, NE. Tabitha offers a continuum of services to elders, including the first Green House homes in Nebraska and the second built nationally. Joyce attributes her desire to work in elder care to her deep relationship with her grandmother and the wisdom she shared with her growing up. After graduating from the University of Nebraska with a bachelor’s degree in Education, she pursued a career in teaching before beginning her career with Tabitha in 1981, where she served as the administrator of their nursing and rehabilitation center for fourteen years. Currently, as the Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning, she is responsible for directing the overall planning, monitoring, communication, and progress of Tabitha’s business and strategic plan.

Joyce_web

Joyce (right) with her mother

Joyce was inspired to champion the development of Tabitha’s four Green House homes after listening to Dr. Thomas speak about The Green House vision in 2001. As an administrator of a traditional facility, she knew the opportunity to imagine a blank page, and create more of what she knew elder care could be through The Green House model was the next step in writing Tabitha’s future chapters. After sharing the vision, the board approved the development of one Green House home after half the initial funds were raised. Joyce identifies that engaging with a grant writer to help locate available funding sources and network with organizational leaders was a crucial strategy to raise the initial funds for the Martin house, their first Green House home to nine elders. After they demonstrated the success of the model through the Martin house, three more homes were built, with plans to purchase property and build four additional homes in the future.

From a cost perspective, Joyce states that their Green House homes are major contributors to the success of the

Construction of a Green House home on Tabitha's campus

Construction of the Good House

entire company. Specifically, adding Green House homes for long term care into Tabitha’s continuum of services provided an opportunity to expand their capacity for post acute short term rehabilitation in their legacy building. This balance of costs and revenues combined aids in the growth of Tabitha’s entire organization. Further, Joyce describes that the quality of care associated with their Green House homes has become a hallmark within the community that is a “magnet” for people seeking long term care. This high demand results in a reliable, sustainable census that is crucial for overall operational success.

However, Joyce notes that the true success or “magic” of The Green House model comes from the incredible people who live and work in the homes and the culture created to foster deep knowing relationships. “It’s the most important part of getting The Green House model correct. If you don’t have the right people and you don’t provide an environment which empowers them to do their work with the elders… if that doesn’t happen the most beautiful and perfectly designed houses are really a waste of time and money.” At Tabitha, recruiting extremely creative, great people has resulted in

Annual Green House carnival

Annual Green House carnival

unique teams in each home where people feel empowered to bring who they are into their work. This results in extraordinary events and celebrations, such as their annual Green House carnival, and quiet everyday moments of compassion, love, and joy in the homes that couldn’t occur in a traditional setting. For Joyce, when talking about her accomplishments in her career, she identifies working with The Green House Project as the one she’s most proud of, yet is continuously striving for success in providing the highest quality of care for elders. When thinking about her Green House legacy in the future, she hopes it reads “But as remarkable as the Green House model became, what came next from these pioneers in elder care was even better.”

Listen to this recorded webinar interview>>


Lebanon Valley Brethren Home Releases New Video Highlighting Their Green House homes

By / Posted on January 6th, 2016

At Lebanon Valley Brethren Home we believe in empowering our elders and providing innovative ways to care for their needs both in mind, body and spirit. This video is the story about our Green House homes, which are designed to serve those who need the highest level of nursing care.

LVBH

Lebanon Valley Green House home

We decided to tell our story by video for a few different reasons.  First and foremost, we wanted to create a clear and visual way to describe The Green House model to prospective elders and their families.  Because we limit outside visits to preserve the value of ‘real home’,video is another way to create that “seeing is believing” experience.

Additionally, this video is a great way to educate our team, community and stakeholders about The Green House model.   By ensuring that our network understands the value of this model and the life that we are creating at Lebanon Valley Brethren Home, we are looking forward to their support in building more Green House homes in the future.

Thank you for taking the time to watch our video, and if you would like to learn more about our community, please visit our website.

Jeff Shireman is the President and CEO of Lebanon Valley Brethren Home

 


Better Together, The 8th Annual Green House Meeting and Celebration

By / Posted on November 25th, 2015


Portrait of a Green House Leader, Terry Rogers

By / Posted on November 14th, 2015

Terry Rogers, President & CEO of Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, in Birmingham, AL was recently highlighted in The Green House Project‘s Leadership webinar series. His organization includes, St. Martin’s in the Pines, a continuing care retirement community and home care service in Birmingham, with nine Green House cottages.

terry and elderTerry’s inspiration for a career in health came from observing his mother as caregiver to family members and neighbors, graduate from nursing school, and enter the home health profession. After graduating from The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Terry began his healthcare administration career in business and operations positions with home health agencies, hospitals, and the Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, where he has served as President & CEO since 2000. In addition, he serves as a member of the Community Advisory Committee for the University of Alabama Comprehensive Center on Healthy Aging, the National Public Policy Congress, the Budget and Finance Committee, and the Business Strategy Council for LeadingAge, in addition to his service as member of the Green House Project Peer Network Steering Committee.

Terry began his career with St. Martin’s with a formal long range planning effort aimed at redeveloping the campus and replacing the skilled nursing building. His colleague, Linda Robertson, an Eden Alternative Associate, directed him towards the work of The Green House Project in Tupelo, Mississippi. After attending a workshop in Tupelo, he returned to Birmingham to inform the board about this innovative model of care and identify what a new nursing home may look like on their campus. Terry describes that seeing truly is believing; the enthusiasm for the model carried throughout the board and to the broader community and together they were committed to developing the first Green House homes in Alabama. He attributes this success to formally engaging with The Green House Project team to aid in the collaborative design process of their multi-story Green House homes and assist in overcoming regulatory hurdles by training state regulators about the Green House model.

st. martins_ shovelsDuring the development process, Terry notes that “we had a steep hill to climb” but felt confident given the robust training opportunities provided by The Green House Project team and the value of being associated with the model given the research supporting its success. He continues to be an advocate for the model integrity process and the importance of the Green House trademark as a method of accountability throughout the Peer Network to ensure the original guiding principles are instilled in every community. “We didn’t get into The Green House model because it was easy, we got into this because it was the right thing. Changing in the right way is why we’re having the outcomes we’re having. If we start letting “the right way” be diluted, the outcomes are going to change… we think The Green House model works and we want to do it in the right way and we want everyone in the Peer Network to do it the right way as well.”

At St. Martin’s, continuing team education is key in maintaining the integrity of the model and helps leadership “keep it fresh.” Terry describes that continuing assessment and evaluation creates an opportunity for leaders to revisit the beginnings of why they started and to continually engage in action plans for improvements. As the “keepers of the philosophy”, leaders must problem solve, motivate, and coach their teams through consistent messaging of the model. Since opening, St. Martin’s aims to serve as a role model and brand ambassador to encourage and invigorate The Green House model into future organizations and help them throughout their journey.

Upon opening, Terry observed the model’s financial success as a result of the shift in operational cost structure and the flattened hierarchy that creates a “middle management shake-up.” Furthermore, adding Green House cottages into the St. Martin’s continuum of care created a competitive advantage that drives demand at all levels of care, resulting in a corresponding increase in their assisted living and independent living occupancy of approximately 5%. This influx of revenue allows St. Martin’s to promote the community giveback component of their mission to ensure that Elders have the opportunity to live in their cottages regardless of their payor status.

In terms of quality of care, Terry describes that “there’s a little bit of magic taking place” in their Green House cottages that yields better outcomes. Specifically, their 100% occupancy rate, higher family satisfaction survey scores, and positive clinical outcomes are a result of better, deeper knowing in their Green House homes. The Green House principles “just makes sense.” Despite the Green House model’s success at St. Martin’s, Terry notes that they can always do better and are constantly seeking improvements. He is pleased to be a part of the Peer Network and associated with other courageous change agents that are never satisfied in knowing all they need to know in caring for elders.

A lifelong resident of Birmingham, Terry loves fishing, Crimson Tide football (Roll Tide!), participating in barbecue competitions, and spending as much time as possible by the lake with his family. He is presenting at the 2015 Annual Meeting with Green House Project team members Susan Frazier and Marla DeVries on the Model Enrichment Resource and Integrity Tool (MERIT) and the research that supports this process for sustainability.  To hear the full interview>>


GROUNDBREAKING OF CLARK-LINDSEY’S GREEN HOUSE HOMES FOR DEMENTIA CARE

By / Posted on October 2nd, 2015

Green House Homes Will Be First of Their Kind in Champaign County

(Reprinted from Perkins Eastman) Last Thursday, September 24, in Urbana, IL, team members from the Chicago office of international design and architecture firm Perkins Eastman joined leadership from Clark-Lindsey for the groundbreaking of the CCRC’s new small homes for specialized dementia care—one devoted to assisted living and the other for skilled nursing care—that will follow The GREEN HOUSE® model. Each home will feature 12 private bedrooms, individualized care from specially trained caregivers, and home furnishings. The Perkins Eastman design team is led by Principal Jerry Walleck AIA and Associate Principal Ramu Ramachandran AIA, LEED AP, two key members of the firm’s renowned senior living practice area.

clark lindseyClark-Lindsey has partnered with The Green House Project and Perkins Eastman to help usher in a new and superior standard of care for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses. The introduction of these homes not only marks the first Green House project in Champaign County but also a major step forward for how Illinois providers and regulatory officials are looking to institute efficient and innovative care models for seniors. Green House homes are designed to provide a personalized model of care within a real home setting, replete with an open kitchen, dining room and other common areas, setting them apart from the traditional institutional model that can resemble a hospital or nursing home.

clark lindsey2The new homes, situated on a 10,000 sf footprint, will feature an architectural design where every inch of space has been carefully considered in order to transform the physical environment to feel more like home. From the outdoor courtyard, library and den areas to the open kitchen providing home cooked meals, these amenities encourage social contact among elders and caregivers. The homes’ design is tailored to maintain existing on-site trees as well as acknowledge the natural surroundings with respect to building proportion, scale and form, while also taking full advantage of the expansive views of adjacent Meadowbrook Park.

“Clark-Lindsey is already known within the industry as a leader and innovator when it comes to care,” says Jerry Walleck, the project’s design lead, “and the new Green House homes are a continuation of that. They will provide invaluable care and services to dementia residents and their families, and it’s an enormous privilege to have played our part in making that happen.” Both homes are scheduled to open in late 2016.

Clark-Lindsey Village was founded in 1978 and is the area’s first and only CCRC. It is one of only eight certified Centers for Successful Aging in the U.S. In addition to its forthcoming dementia care small homes, Clark-Lindsey Village offers extensive independent living accommodations, as well as inpatient and outpatient therapy services, assisted living and skilled nursing care at its Meadowbrook Health Center.

The Green House Project is a radically new national model for skilled nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self- contained homes organized to deliver individualized care and meaningful relationships between residents and care staff.

About Perkins Eastman
Perkins Eastman is among the top design and architecture firms in the world. With almost 950 employees in 14 locations around the globe, Perkins Eastman practices at every scale of the built environment. From niche buildings to complex projects that enrich whole communities, the firm’s portfolio reflects a dedication to progressive and inventive design that enhances the quality of the human experience. With work in 46 states and more than 40 countries, the firm’s portfolio includes transportation and public infrastructure, high-end residential, commercial, hotels, retail, office buildings, corporate interiors, schools, hospitals, museums, senior living, and public sector facilities. Perkins Eastman provides award-winning design through its offices in North America (New York, NY; Boston, MA; Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Los Angeles, CA; Pittsburgh, PA; San Francisco, CA; Stamford, CT; Toronto, Canada; and Washington, DC); South America (Guayaquil, Ecuador); North Africa and Middle East (Dubai, UAE); and Asia (Mumbai, India, and Shanghai, China).

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Jefferson County Creates Sustainable Change Across Their Organization

By / Posted on September 17th, 2015

In order to change the way that the world sees aging, it is important to not just implement The Green House model, but also to sustain it.  Through experience and research, we have found that this occurs most successfully when culture change exists throughout the organization, not just within The Green House homes.

JCNH Green House

Jefferson County Green House home

Jefferson County Nursing home in Tennessee opened their three Green House homes in 2010, and have experienced successful outcomes and stories of transformation.  As they look to the future, they have decided to partner again with The Green House Project on a process called, The Legacy Blueprint.  This program is offered to Green House organizations when they also have a legacy home to promote alignment of the core values and essential practices of The Green House model.  All elders, regardless of where they live, deserve a small, flexible and warm environment with opportunities for choice, and a sense of purpose.

Roger Mynatt, Executive Director of Jefferson County Nursing Home, shares, “We chose work with The Green House Project on the Legacy Blueprint because it will create the perfect bridge between the Legacy Building and our Green House homes.  We are taking the best of our mission and complimenting it with the Green House Core Values to create staff empowerment and person-directed care.”

Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010

Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010

To learn more about The Green House implementation process, click here to download Homes for Success