Breakthrough Skilled Nursing Facility Opening In Central Arkansas

By / Posted on July 2nd, 2018

The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove (https://poplargrove.care/) announced today the planned Fall 2018 opening of the their long term and rehabilitative care facility in Little Rock, Arkansas. Poplar Grove is the first facility in Central Arkansas based on the Green House® model of care. (thegreenhouseproject.org)

“Poplar Grove is what the future of care can and should be for our elders,” said John Montgomery, Executive Director of Poplar Grove. “We’ve adopted this new model of care so that we can serve our community better than ever before, providing a higher quality of life for residents, as well as peace of mind for their families.”

The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove is creating over one hundred and forty new jobs in Central Arkansas. Commenting on the healthcare jobs being created Montgomery said: “We are looking for people who are passionate about the care and service they provide to others. You don’t necessarily need a background in healthcare to join our team. Do you love to cook for others? Do you love to plan and coordinate activities? Are you a registered nurse who has been anxiously waiting to transition into the new model of healthcare? We are looking for people who recognize the autonomy and dignity of care recipients and are passionate about creating a fantastic long term and rehabilitative care environment.”

Poplar Grove is built on the Green House® model of care, a revolutionary movement transforming skilled rehabilitation and nursing home care nationwide. The Green House® model has been highly acclaimed by many national experts and leading publications because it has been shown to deliver better health and satisfaction outcomes than traditional nursing homes (for more, see: (Green House Model Articles).

Here are five ways the Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove is different from a traditional nursing home:

  • A 1:4 direct care staff ratio, substantially more than the State/Federal average
  • A small cottage environment with a maximum of 12 residents, living life to its fullest in their own home with private rooms, private bathroom and showers, made to order, “family-style” meals based on elder’s choice… and so much more
  • A philosophy of care rooted in meaningful relationships, holistic care and a deep knowledge of each elder and their specific needs, produces a better quality of life and care
  • Superior equipment and technology
  • Each staff member undergoes a minimum of 120 hours of additional education and training in areas such as nutritional services; senior care techniques and dementia to become geriatric care specialists.

The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove in Little Rock will join the Green House® Cottages of Belle Meade in Paragould, AR, The Green House® of Southern Hills in Rison, AR and the Green House Cottages of Wentworth Place in Magnolia, AR as the fourth Green House® model facility developed by Southern Administrative Services, LLC in Arkansas.

“We are proud to bring this transformative new model of long term care to Central Arkansas,” said John Ponthie, Founding Member and Managing Director of Southern Administrative Services LLC. “By delivering outstanding care and creating a real home environment and providing elders with dignity, autonomy and choice, Poplar Grove will provide our Elders with the best quality of life possible.”

About The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove

The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove (https://poplargrove.care/) create loving homes where Elders are supported by quality care, choice, and positive relationships. In our homes, the Elder, not a calendar on the wall, decides the schedule of each Elder. Our caregivers are dedicated to the homes, helping to create meaningful relationships with our Elders. While Poplar Grove is licensed and skilled nursing community, the cottages are designed to look like the homes in the surrounding neighborhood. Homes feature high ceilings in the hearth rooms of each cottage, large windows throughout for natural light, and private bedrooms, each with a private en-suite full bathroom.

Media Inquiries

John Montgomery
Executive Director – The Green House® Cottages of Poplar Grove
johnm@poplargrove.care
501- 454 – 5604

Rick Rogala
CEO- Bespoke Health Media
rrogala@bespokehealthmedia.com
501-765-1841


The First Green House Homes Turn 15 Years Old

By / Posted on May 14th, 2018

“For thousands of years, elders have been held in high esteem and involved in the community,” says Steve McAlilly, CEO of Mississippi Methodist Senior Services. As the world shifted and the role of elders changed, Steve sought a way to bring them back to a place of reverence and respect. 15 years ago, Steve courageously opened the first Green House home in Tupelo, MS, effectively building a home where elders could live full and meaningful lives, “Within hours of moving in, a peace came over the home,” Steve remarks.

Not only do these homes positively effect the elders who live in them, but also the direct care staff who take on expanded roles to become the managers of the home. The skills that they learn in The Green House homes affect every area of their lives, “I’ve watched team members grow and thrive in the Green House” says Michele Daniel, VP of Philanthropy & Strategic Implementation. Mississippi Methodist Senior Services currently has 19 Green House homes on four separate campuses.

Returning the elders to a place of esteem, honor and respect is an investment in the quality of life of the entire community.

This 15 year milestone began with the vision of Dr. Bill Thomas and was embraced by Steve McAlilly’s leadership.  Thanks to the support of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this radically simple innovation has become a proven movement that continues to grow with integrity and sustainability. Now with Green House homes open and operating in 33 states, small house nursing homes are a trend addressing many of the challenges in healthcare. The Green House model is demonstrating that the status quo is not good enough and that there is a better way. Thank you to Mississippi Methodist Senior Services, and all of The Green House partners who have opened their doors in the past 15 years. Together we are fostering environments of empowerment, dignity and respect, and a world where every individual can anticipate a hopeful future


The Small House Pilot in California, Changing the Face of Aging

By / Posted on May 8th, 2018

Update, 05/18: The Green House Senior Director, Susan Ryan was honored to join Leslie G. Moldow, FAIA, LEED of Perkins Eastman and Mary Muñoz of Ziegler at the LeadingAge California conference to speak about The Small House Pilot, and how providers can seize this moment to enhance the way elders in California age. Collaborating with strong leaders in our field makes our collective voice louder and our impact greater. 

Originally Published 01/18

It is a pivotal moment in California’s history.  The Small House Pilot Program is now live, and it has the potential to clearly demonstrate that there is a better way to deliver skilled nursing care. This profound opportunity requires that nursing home providers across the state, take a stand, and say, NOW IS THE TIME!

The wait has been long, making this moment all the more powerful.  In 2013, through a tenacious journey, Mt. San Antonio Gardens became the first Green House Project in California. The work that they did to make regulatory gains with stakeholders across the state blazed a trail and were codified in late 2012, as Governor Brown signed into law Senate Bill 1228 (introduced by Sen. Elaine Alquist). The bill created The Small House Skilled Nursing Facilities Pilot Program, which authorized the development and operation of 10 pilot projects to deliver skilled nursing care in smaller, residential settings, “It puts the ‘home’ back into nursing home”, said Senator Alquist (D-San Jose). However, it wasn’t until early 2018, that the regulations to support this bill were released, and the request for applications is now open to the public. As a perennial advocate for elder directed, relationship rich living, The Green House Project is eager to support every effort to ensure the success of this opportunity.

The Green House Project has come to be recognized as the leader of the small house movement to create a high-quality, cost-effective, human-scale alternative to the traditional nursing home. Studies of the Green House model have found that:
• Residents have a better quality of life and receive higher-quality care than residents in traditional nursing homes.
• Staff report higher job satisfaction and increased likelihood of remaining in their jobs.
• Family members are willing to drive farther and pay more to have access to a Green House home for a loved one.

Real Home, Meaningful Life, and Empowered Staff: these core values align well with the regulations of the Small House Pilot in California, and they drive change in Green House homes, creating quality outcomes, consumer demand and preferred partnerships in the healthcare system.

With 15 years of expertise in design, education and evaluation, The Green House Project is a strong partner to support the expedited timeline and in-depth requirements of this pilot. The first deadline for submission is June, 2018. Design tools, like The Green House Prototype, along with educational protocols and policy and procedure expertise, will ensure an organization is able to successfully navigate this application. Susan Ryan, Senior Director of The Green House Project says, “The Green House Project specializes in a comprehensive cultural transformation that shifts the beliefs, behaviors, and systems to ensure a lasting investment across an organizational system. It is more than simply a process from ‘this’ to ‘that’; a real transformation unleashes the best of what can be by accessing collective wisdom.” The national initiative stands ready to support nursing home innovators in California, to ensure better lives for elders and those who work closest to them.

With California’s number of individuals 85 and older expected to triple by 2030, the market for Green House homes and others like them is rapidly growing. Consumer demand for the kind and quality of care that The Green House model provides has long existed, but until recently, California’s regulatory and approval process had been unable to accommodate non-traditional models of care. In fact, it took almost seven years for Mt. San Antonio Gardens to gain the approval it needed from multiple local and state agencies. Inspired by their lessons learned, Senate Bill 1228, and the newly released regulations, will enable innovation without obstacle. The Green House Project calls every organization interested in creating a real home, meaningful life and empowered work opportunities for the citizens of California to contact us, and together we will forge a trail to a brighter future.


The GREEN HOUSE Project Showcased in #ElderCareChat Discussion on Innovations in Senior Care

By / Posted on April 30th, 2018

#ElderCareChat recap - OurParents.comThe GREEN HOUSE Project was pleased to join the April 25 #ElderCareChat, with Director of Operations Debbie Wiegand serving as an expert panelist. Wiegand engaged participants in an informative Twitter conversation about innovations in senior care while also describing how The GREEN HOUSE Project has come to be recognized as the leader in creating high-quality, cost-effective, and sustainable, human-scale alternatives to the traditional nursing home.

The hour-long #ElderCareChat put the need for innovative solutions in context, with Wiegand explaining how an aging population is driving the need for more senior care options. The topic was inspired by a recent blog post that discussed how the Green House model has become a catalyst for change in the field of long-term care. The model’s emphasis on creating a “real home” environment, with a look and feel that is residential rather than institutional, has gained considerable attention in the skilled nursing care space.

The Twitter session, which generated more than 3.4 million impressions and nearly 400 tweets, gave the 25 participants the opportunity to share their thoughts on a variety of topics, including what they perceived to be the major trends in senior care. One participant identified a movement toward more person-centered care. Another mentioned the need for a social/cultural change with regard to how we look at aging. In addition, several participants cited technology as having an increasing impact on senior care solutions.

In conjunction with an aging population, Wiegand sees an increasing demand for more innovative memory care solutions. “Correlated with the increasing number of elders is the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, and the need for high-quality models that focus on the whole person, rather than the traditional biomedical model that focuses primarily on decline and disease,” Wiegand tweeted, adding that a Green House program called “Best Life” was created to equipment caregivers with the knowledge and skills needed to help elders living with dementia thrive.

Wiegand also stressed the importance of frontline professionals building meaningful relationships with elders and their families. “Changing demographics exacerbate staffing challenges in nursing homes,” she observed. “Without the availability of quality jobs that offer expanded roles and opportunities for growth, the long-term care industry is at great risk for worker shortages.”

The chat also included a discussion of the advantages of smaller, more residential living spaces for elders. Wiegand explained that Green House homes are designed to create warmth and foster “intentional community.” “Smaller is better,” she tweeted, “meaning less square footage, which helps to support elder mobility, familiarity and access to all spaces of home, and reduce costs of construction.”

A chat participant observed that smaller, more intimate environments allow for better relationships with caregivers, tweeting, “The social, family atmosphere of residential living spaces eliminates the institutional stigma that is often associated with eldercare.”

Participants were highly receptive to innovative solutions being introduced to the long-term care space. As one senior care professional tweeted, “The day we stop innovating is the day we need to find a new job!”

“The GREEN HOUSE Project is all about relationships and deep knowing,” Wiegand concluded. “We embrace technology, but never at the expense of the human touch and connection.”

For those wanting to learn more, the GREEN HOUSE Project will host a webinar on workforce issues at 1 p.m. ET May 3. Register now.

In addition, The GREEN HOUSE Project is presenting opportunities to visit Green House homes and take a deep dive into the model at the following locations:

Feel free to peruse the transcript of the 4/25/18 #ElderCareChat session.

#ElderCareChat is presented by A Place for Mom‘s OurParents.com in conjunction with sister sites SeniorAdvisor.com and VeteranAid.org as a forum to share resources, experiences, and expertise in eldercare. Stay tuned to @OurParents Twitter handle for information regarding the next #ElderCareChat.


Innovations and Trends in Elder Care

By / Posted on March 29th, 2018

Lisa McCracken, Ziegler

In the first of our four-part “Making the Business Case for Culture Change” series, Lisa McCracken, Director of Senior Living Research & Development at Ziegler shares an overview of key trends and innovations in elder care. Ziegler is one of the nation’s leading underwriters in financing for not-for-profit senior living providers and works with merger and acquisition activity in the private sector. As the Director of Senior Living Research & Development, Lisa conducts market research and trend analysis and contributes to educational articles and white papers on key industry topics.

Rising demographic changes are driving evolution and innovation in senior living organizations. Specifically, there are two key stakeholder groups providers need to target when thinking about their market audience, the baby boomers and millennials. As roughly 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 each day, the aging services spectrum enters a large period of scale. We now see a trend in non-traditional healthcare players entering the industry as they discover their unique role in solutions around aging, from technology to transportation. Senior living providers will need to adapt and evolve to meet the new preferences and characteristics of the baby boomer generation to connect with the new older adult. Specifically, Lisa discusses language changes, wellness initiatives, resident engagement and support services, and community life. As a major part of the workforce of the future, millennials have new values regarding recruitment, retention, and employee engagement. Lisa encourages providers to be “thinking smart” about attracting millennials into our field, particularly when competing with other industries. Four out of the six top projected in-demand occupations fall in our field, creating a growing number of professional opportunities for this rising workforce (Personal Care Aide, Registered Nurse, Home Health Aide, and Certified Nursing Assistant). Lisa shares labor challenges many organizations face and presents best practices to overcome workforce barriers to attract and retain great talent.

How is senior living changing and growing? There are significant differences between not-for-profit and for-profit growth and development. In the not-for-profit sector, organizations are focused on expanding and renovating current communities rather than building new locations to adapt to the changing demographic. Not-for-profit providers are also focused on repositioning their skilled nursing neighborhoods away from the institutional model and reinvesting in real home environments, such as The Green House model to support organizational culture change and provide elder-centered care. In the for-profit sector, Ziegler is seeing a growing number of new communities, particularly in the Assisted Living and Memory Care space across the country. However, in both sectors, there is a growing number of sponsorship transitions and mergers and acquisitions because of several factors, including the increased complexity of healthcare reform and organizational leadership turnover.

In our dynamic environment, Lisa provides an overview of the pressures many providers are facing, particularly in the post-acute rehab space. Decreased length of stay, higher acuity levels, narrowing hospital networks, and an increasing number of treatment plans that skip skilled care entirely place high pressures on skilled nursing providers as occupancy trends decline. Lastly, as we look toward the future, we see new technology entrepreneurs continue to emerge providing innovative solutions that are paving the future of resident care, organizational staffing, caregiver communication, and family engagement.

To listen to the full webinar, please register to receive the recording: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8988540930301490433


GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

By / Posted on June 6th, 2017

 

 

For more information, contact:  Susan Ryan
sryan@thegreenhouseproject.org or 703.615.2359

 

 

GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

BALTIMORE, MDThe Green House® Project has received a two-year, $650,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to fulfill its mission of redefining—and humanizing—long-term care in the United States.

The Green House Project aims to end the institutionalization of older adults in America. Under this vision, all elders will have the opportunity to live in small, welcoming homes with dignity, autonomy, choice, and the best quality of life possible, while receiving the care they need.

The new RWJF grant will enable Green House Project leaders at the nonprofit Center for Innovation, which recently acquired the Green House trademark and intellectual property, to continue spearheading this movement. They will work with the leading Green House adopters to further refine the model while spreading it across the country.

Additionally, the national initiative plans to expand the impact of the Green House model through a specialized focus on people living with dementia, people in need of short-term rehabilitation services, and other areas of innovation. The Green House Project, the pioneer of the small house model, offers proven clinical and financial outcomes through a comprehensive cultural transformation across the entire organizational system.

“The Green House Project is a dynamic model that continues to evolve as an agile leader in the field,” said Scott Townsley, president of the Center for Innovation. “The success of the Green House Project has catalyzed a community of thought leaders who are discovering new ways to improve the lives of elders. We’re excited to work in partnership with them to change the way people age.”

The Center for Innovation, where the Green House Project is based, was founded by three members of the faculty at The Erickson School, University of Maryland Baltimore County. The Erickson School is the only program in the country offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees in the management of aging services.

The Green House Project launched more than a dozen years ago with the shared vision of its founder, William Thomas, M.D., and RWJF, for transforming long-term care. Today, 231 Green House homes are open and operating, serving elders in 32 states across the country, and another 150 are in the works.

“We owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Thomas for his role in helping to get the Green House Project to where it is today,” said Susan Ryan, senior director of The Green House Project.  “We wish him well in his future endeavors to move the field forward.”

The Green House Project has a solid evidence base. Supported by RWJF, the THRIVE Research Collaborative conducted a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the Green House model.  A team of leading health care and long-term researchers conducted a half-dozen studies that addressed workforce issues, quality of care, cost savings, and culture change.  These studies, all published in the journal Health Services Research, found that:

  • Elders in Green House homes were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, to be bedridden, to need catheters, or to have pressure sores than those in non-Green House homes.
  • Annual inpatient and skilled nursing facility Medicare costs were significantly lower for elders in Green House homes.
  • Caregiving staff in Green House homes spent more time per day with elders than caregiving staff in non-Green House homes.

“The Green House Project is what people want—for themselves and for their loved ones,” said Nancy Barrand, senior adviser for program development at RWJF.  “We want to ensure that every community has a Green House home and that the Green House Project becomes the standard of quality for all nursing care.”

 To learn more about The Green House Project, visit:  thegreenhouseproject.org

 

 

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The First Green House Homes in Rhode Island Are Open

By / Posted on May 22nd, 2017

THE GREEN HOUSE Homes at Saint Elizabeth Home in East Greenwich are open! These are the first new nursing homes to open in RI in over 25 years.


The Evolution and Impact of The Green House model: Interview with Journalist and Author, Beth Baker

By / Posted on January 30th, 2017

Beth Baker, Journalist

There are 214 Green House homes, however there are 15,600 traditional nursing homes in our country.  As we work to transform long term care, Beth Baker has been a critical voice in journalism, describing innovations in the field.  She has spent the last decade telling the story of culture change to a wide audience and earlier this month, Beth Baker highlighted The Green House model as The Nursing Home of the Future, in Politico Magazine.  

As a journalist and author, Beth Baker, writes about healthcare in outlets like The Washington Post and the AARP Bulletin, describing what is possible in long term care,”What [The Green House Project] does is to demonstrate that people can keep living and enjoying life until their last breath given the right environment and relationships.”  This journey led her to Tupelo, the first Green House homes, and the transformative story of Mildred Adams:

Beth became intrigued by the rich human stories found throughout the culture change world, and eventually decided to write a book, Old Age in A New Age.  Her work has expanded,  in a second book, With A Little Help From Our Friends, that focuses on “the importance of community and social connection as we grow older.”  Beth sees boundless opportunities to write about people who are,”looking at aging in our society and thinking about how to make it a richer and more respected time of life.”

When Politico approached Beth, they asked her to write a visionary piece about the nursing home of the future… when Beth pitched The Green House model, they were delighted to see the potential that exists today to create meaningful lives for those who live and work in long term care.

In her reporting for the Politico article, Beth visited Lebanon Valley Brethren Home in Palmyra, PA.  After a three hour drive on a cold, rainy day she shared how warm and welcoming it was to ring the doorbell and walk into the home, ” there was a fire in the hearth and one of the women was doing a jigsaw puzzle… it felt so familiar and was just a reminder of why [The Green House] is such a wonderful model”.  Through interviews with elders and Lebanon Valley Brethren Home CEO, Jeff Shireman, Beth was able to convey the comprehensive nature of the model, and how the interplay of the environment, organizational redesign and philosophy work together to create positive clinical, financial and satisfaction outcomes, “Having a strong case for the finances and business outcomes of The Green House Project has been really important, ” remarks Baker.

Beth Baker’s credible voice shines light on the potential for aging to be different, and it is so important that we continue, because as Beth shares, we have a lot of work to do, ” … It is going to take a culture change beyond long term care… [we need] a change in how we view aging, to get people to accept that it doesn’t have to be the way that it has always been.”

To read the full Politico Article>> 

 

 


ProBuilder.com, Green House Innovative in Design and Model

By / Posted on January 11th, 2017

exterior-carmel-home

The Green House Cottages of Carmel, Carmel, IN

An intentionally built environment is crucial to support the success a person-directed home.  ProBuilder Magazine highlights innovation in senior care with a focus on the comprehensive transformation of The Green House model.  Green House “has three core values,” says senior director Susan Frazier Ryan, “real homes, meaningful life (culture) and empowered staff (organizational change/human architecture, all of which help an elder live the best life.”

This article features innovative Green House homes, including St. John’s, the first

St. John's Penfield Green House homes in Rochester.  SWBR designed these homes in collaboration with the team from St. John's and The Green House Project

Penfield Green House homes of St. John’s, Rochester, NY

community integrated Green House homes as a model to influence future developers as they look to meet the needs of an aging population,”In 10 years, the first of the 77 million baby boomers will turn 80. That’s the age, say those involved in senior housing, where the intersection of the built environment and health is critical.”

Read The Full Article>>


Researcher Spreads The Green House Message Through Her Work

By / Posted on December 12th, 2016

Lori Gonzalez, Florida State University

Lori Gonzalez, Florida State University

Lori Gonzalez is a PhD researcher at the Claude Pepper Center of Florida State University who studies alternatives to traditional nursing care and social inequality.  She spoke at The 9th Annual Green House meeting about how she discovered The Green House model, and her passion to spread its message.   

“Of those who were surveyed, most frail elders reported that they would choose death over a nursing home.” This was one of the first studies that I came across when I started working as a researcher at the Claude Pepper Center at Florida State University. As I delved deeper into the research literature regarding quality of care and quality of life in long-term care it became clear why the elders in the survey would say such a thing.  Study after study reported resident lack of autonomy, lack of privacy, and lack of dignity.  The physical environment in many nursing homes resembles the hospital instead of home.  Staff and resident schedules are rigid.  Unhappiness and dehumanization abound.  Although the problems are well documented in the literature, few solutions are offered.

Eventually, I came across the early research on The Green House Project.  Not only were Green House homes the comprehensive answer to a complex problem, but the research showed that they were effective in reducing many of the ills facing both elders and staff in the traditional nursing home.  Since then, I have been following The Green House movement and advocating for the model as an independent researcher.  For example, my op-ed that appeared in the Tampa Bay Times earlier this year argues that Florida, during its temporary lift of the moratorium on new nursing home bed construction, has the opportunity to build more livable, human-scale residences like Green House homes instead of the traditional, large-scale institutional model.

I have also been documenting a story of elder empowerment at the Woodlands of John Knox Village (JKV) Green House homes in Pompano Beach, John Knox_Final ExteriorFlorida.  When the community’s rehab facility needed replacing, several elders used their vote on the board to bring The Green House model to JKV.  It took several years, lots of back and forth, but in the end—it was the elders who insisted that The Green House model was what they wanted, that according to their research, it was right for their community. I had the honor of touring the beautiful, bathed in natural light, full of life homes, and the honor of speaking with elders, guides, direct care staff, and the CEO—it is a place where elders truly rule.

I will continue to try to help spread the model because The Green House Project provides the type of long-term care that elders want and deserve.


Electric Energy Takes Green House Adopters Beyond Better!

By / Posted on November 30th, 2016

The energy is always electric when Green House adopters are together. “As a national initiative, amazing things happen when so many changemakers are in the same room,”  shares Senior Director, Susan Ryan, “The opportunity for rich discussion, relationship building and thoughtful questions is irreplaceable. ”   That was certainly the case as over 250 Green House adopters gathered at The 2016 Green House Annual Meeting—Beyond Better.tshirt-shot_web

visit to Green HillHosted in New Jersey, attendees were able to visit two open Green House homes, Morris Hall Meadows and Green Hill.  Representing 30 states and over 200 open homes, the growing Peer Network is one of the greatest values of participating in this initiative.  Green House stakeholder, John Grace, said, “It was nice to attend an intimate gathering where “practical application” is the theme of the day.”

Pre-Conference workshops provided role specific opportunities to explore areas that research proves are vital to the sustainability and success of the model, such as coaching and empowerment.  Senior executives joined President of Center for Innovation, Inc., the sponsor of The Green House Project,  Scott Townsley, to discuss the strategic trends impacting healthcare, and how The Green House model must continue to evolve in order to lead the way to a better tomorrow.

Marc Middleton, CEO of Growing Bolder, opened the meeting with an inspiring message that what the mind believes, the body embraces, and a call to belimarc-middleton_webeve in the potential of elders!  This multimedia presentation thoroughly dismantled the myths of aging, and set a tone of possibility for the rest of the meeting.

With breakout sessions focused on key operational topics like convivium, spirituality, team building and hiring, adopters left the conference with a full ‘toolbox’ of new skills and ideas to eni-am-green-house_webhance their homes and organizations.  An original spoken word piece, called, “I Am Green House”, brought the crowd to their feet, as a shahbaz, a nurse, a family member and an elder shared what it really means to live this movement everyday.

This year, intensive sessions were offered as opportunities to take a  deep dive in areas of dementia, coaching leadership and bringing Green House values into the legacy home.   Hot topics, real discussion, and an impetus to keep wali_question_webgrowing, resonated throughout the conference. The “Inner Circle” was a unique networking space for attendees to meet their peers and help to co-create the future.  Reciprocity of active learning and shared experience is making a difference and changing the world.

Sustainability is crucial in the work that we do, and a quality benchmarking resource was presented to attendees with a tangible charge to never stop improving.  Exciting results are being discovered as the evidence-base for The Green House model grows.

The conference closed with Ashton Applewhite, anti-ageism advocate and author of This Chair Rocks, an Manifesto Against Ageism, sending a passionate appeal to fight ageism in all its forms.  With humor and personal stories, Ashton served as the perfect way to end the conference feeling challenged and  inspired.

susan-speaking_web“THE POWER OF THE MOVEMENT IS YOU!” says, Susan Ryan, to an empowered audience of Green House adopters.  The national initiative is able to push the envelope of what is possible because of the innovative and excellent work of Green House adopters and those stakeholders who are changing what it means to age.

Next year marks the 10th Annual Green House Meeting.  Held in Florida, with host site, John Knox Village, this meeting continues to grow in meaning and scope, as Green House adopters truly go, Beyond Better!

 


New GREEN HOUSE® project in full swing at Saint Elizabeth Home

By / Posted on October 27th, 2016

Saint Elizabeth Community in Greenwich, RI broke a 20 year moratorium on new nursing home beds with their development of 4 Green House homes that will provide both long term care and short term rehabilitation. Learn more about their project and progress in this news report.