A Global Community of Thought Leaders at The Green House Annual Meeting

By / Posted on December 22nd, 2017

“Waves of Change, Oceans of Opportunity” became more than a theme for the 2017 Green House Annual Meeting, it became a rallying cry. The world is at a pivotal point, and the meeting tapped into the collective potential of an innovative group to help shape the future. Over 250 people from around the globe converged in sunny Florida to connect, learn and grow. Hosted by the progressive and gracious John Knox Village, attendees were able to experience the potential of The Green House model, firsthand. Coming on the heels of the devastating Hurricane Irma, The Green House community came together to raise over $1200 for disaster relief, including many in-kind donations.  Engaged and generous sponsors add to the rich tapestry of learning, and enhance the conference experience.  Through challenging speakers, interactive opportunities, and recognition of the global voice, the ripples of the time together will continue to be felt for a long time.

Sharpen your skills in the kitchen!  This was the challenge put out to direct care staff who were invited to participate in a “Chop Chef” style competition in the onsite training kitchen at John Knox Village. Under the guidance of Chef Mark of John Knox Village and Chef Ian from Christian Cares in Kentucky, direct care staff gained valuable skills in the kitchen, build strong relationships with peers and deepened their understanding of being an empowered staff member.

Over 40 Executives including representatives from 8 countries participated in a stimulating and challenging session about Social Entrepreneurship led by Green House Board President, Scott Townsley. The commitment and vision of these leaders to share their voice, demonstrates the power of a community of thought leaders to change a paradigm.

The conference opened with keynote speaker, James Wright, challenging the group to explore the meaning and value of diversity in the workplace. Through interactive exercises to uncover unconscious bias and understand the difference between equity and equality, Mr. Wright’s message became a thread for meaningful discussion throughout the conference, and perhaps a new lens to view the world.

Monique, shahbaz at Weinberg Green House homes in Detroit, MI

The Green House Annual Meeting welcomes every role within The Green House model, believing that sharing an education space leads to some incredible conversations and epiphanies. For example, in the closing plenary session, when Monique, a direct care staff member from Detroit, stood up and said, “this is not a job, this is a career”, there was electricity throughout the room, and a heightened understanding that workforce development is essential to ensure sustainable success of Green House homes. The education sessions range from important macro topics like “What You Need to Know About the New CMS Regulations to Lead the Way” to nuts and bolts topics like how to engage in constructive conflict. Facilitated networking through an exercise called “Words Make Worlds”, led to

Words to Leave Behind was followed by a round of Words Make Worlds

spirited conversation, and many creative expressions of words to take forward, and those to leave behind. There is value provided at a strategic level and an operational level, and the interaction that occurs is priceless.

Yaron from Israel, and Janet from Alaska reunited after meeting 8 years ago at Seward Mountain Haven

Last year, one of the far reaching visions was that Green House would “Go Global”. At the time, it seemed like a dream, and then international visionaries began to reach out about bringing Green House to their community. This year, representatives from Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, Israel, Indonesia, Panama and Singapore participated in The Green House conference, and an International Think Tank where ideas and possibility spread through the room like wild fire. One participant remarked that what may have started as a ‘project’ is now far more than that… it is The Green House Movement! Everyone left with a ‘fire in their belly’ to make meaningful change. Conversations and plans have continued full force, and there are now expansive opportunities for Green House to impact the needs of aging individuals on a global scale.

The Green House Annual Meeting is always an energizing time for those who are exploring, implementing and sustaining the model to connect with their peers and deepen their understanding. This year brought new elements that challenged the group to deepen their role as a community of thought leaders and lead society as an inclusive and innovative force that celebrates the intrinsic worth of EVERY individual.   The Green House movement has the energy and vision to disrupt the status quo and propel a dynamic system to new heights amidst a rapidly changing world.


New York Times Calls The Green House, “A Better Kind of Nursing Home”

By / Posted on December 22nd, 2017

Green Hill, West Orange, NJ

At The Green House, vision is merged with rigor, passion with determination, and a belief  that there’s never a best that can’t be made better.   In their article, “A Better Kind of Nursing Home”, The New York Times says, The Green House model is demonstrating that life in long term care can be different. With real life experiences to support the movement, and world-class research to keep improving, the potential for future impact is vast.

“Lots of things look different when you step into a small Green House nursing home.  The bright living and dining space, filled with holiday baubles at this season. The adjacent open kitchen, where the staff is making lunch. The private bedrooms and baths. The lack of long stark corridors, medication carts and other reminders of hospital wards.”

Robyn Grant, public policy director for The National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, emphasizes that the goal of this shift that The Green House Project is leading means “deinstitutionalizing nursing homes, making them more like the way we’ve lived all our lives, with our own routines and familiar objects.”

Green Hill hearth decorated for holidays

The national initiative has committed itself to the rigors of research in pursuit of continued growth.  Research has shown that model components such as consistent and increased staffing, lead to deep knowing of the elder and early detection of health changes, “The [THRIVE] researchers found that Green House residents were 16 percent less likely to be bedridden, 38 percent less likely to have pressure ulcers and 45 percent less likely to have catheters. Avoidable hospitalizations and readmissions were also lower, reassuring observers who wondered if the Green Houses’ emphasis on quality of life meant sacrificing quality of care.”

In a dynamic world and healthcare landscape, it is essential to be a part of the solution. The Green House Project “Compared to traditional nursing homes, no doubt about it,” said Dr. Sheryl Zimmerman of the THRIVE research team. “It’s a preferable model of care.”

Read the Full New York Times Article>>


Green House Featured as Innovator at National LeadingAge Conference

By / Posted on October 20th, 2017

To care well for others, we need to reinforce our own passion for what we do—and actively work to improve how to support our country’s aging population today. That’s exactly what we do at the LeadingAge Annual Meeting & EXPO, our nation’s largest annual event for the not-for-profit aging services field. In education sessions, during general sessions and through eye-opening, one-of-a-kind experiences, you and your team will be immersed in our shared mission of helping older adults thrive.”

The Green House Project is looking forward to opportunities to connect with visionary organizations at this of this event.  Please visit us in the exhibit hall at booth #1913.  Also, don’t miss this informative, challenging and stimulating sessions that feature Green House expertise and innovation:

Monday, October 30, 2017

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

22-C. Integrated vs. Segregated Environments for Persons With Dementia

  • Examine the pros and cons of integrating versus separating elders living with dementia in different settings.
  • Consider how the approach to dementia care and programming has evolved as the physical environment of memory care “units” continues to change from locked wings to neighborhoods.
  • Assess your organization’s philosophy and care practices as they relate to those living with dementia and their care partners.

Speakers:

  • Audrey Weiner, President & CEO, The New Jewish Home, New York, NY
  • Ann Wyatt, Manager, Palliative & Residential Care, CaringKind, New York, NY
  • Susan Ryan, Senior Director, Green House Project, Linthicum, MD
  • Tammy Marshall, Chief Experience Officer, The New Jewish Home, New York, NY
  • J. David Hoglund, Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman, Pittsburgh, PA

 Tuesday, October 31, 2017

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

48-F. From Traditional Skilled Nursing to Green House® Model

  • Discover how resident leadership, administration and board members achieved consensus to transition toward a new model of care.
  • Understand how the new financial model created a platform for new funding opportunities and revenue streams.
  • Consider planning, forecasting, marketing and implementation pitfalls to avoid from both a financial and care perspective.

Speakers:

  • Gerald Stryker, President/CEO, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Rob Seitz, Marketing & Communications Manager, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Jean Eccleston, CFO, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • David Haun, Resident, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Twylah Haun, Resident, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Nanette Olson, Executive Director of the Foundation, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL
  • Monica McAfee, Director of Sales and Marketing, John Knox Village of Florida, Inc., Pompano Beach, FL


‘Politico’ Hails The Nursing Home of the Future

By / Posted on January 13th, 2017

politico1In Rebooting The Nursing Home, Beth Baker shares the deep human stories that describe The Green House model and shaped her visit to Lebanon Valley Brethren Home.  These Green House homes are a part of a “growing movement to transform nursing homes from medicalized institutions to places that feel much more like home.”

Resident choice and autonomy, a homey environment, and well-trained and invested staff are hallmarks of the Green House and similar models that are slowly and fundamentally changing long-term care for Americans who otherwise could be forced into traditional nursing homes.

Lebanon Valley Brethren Home has experienced the model’s benefits from a business politico2perspective, as well.  CEO, Jeff Shireman shared that after the capital investment, operating costs have been comparable or even lower than their traditional nursing home.  This cost savings is directly correlated with the comprehensive paradigm shift of the model and fully leveraging the role of the versatile worker (known as a shahbaz), “What you must do as a leader is to support [the shahbazim] and empower them and hold them accountable,” says the Green House Project’s Senior Director, Susan Ryan. “That is where you’ll see the efficiency.”

politico3This article paints a warm picture of a day in the life of a Green House home, and the elements that make it a viable model that is changing the landscape of long term care.

Read The Full Article>>


The Green House Project Reaches Important Milestone

By / Posted on August 9th, 2016

 

Over 200 Green House Homes Now Open in 30 States 

BALTIMORE, MD (August 9, 2016)– THE GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT has spent over a decade creating a new vision for the future of elder care. In June, the organization reported an important milestone: more than 200 Green House homes are being operated by leading organizations in 30 states.

Upon reaching this new milestone, Green House Senior Director, Susan Ryan says, “It is beyond exciting to see this initiative gaining momentum.  It took us 10 years to reach the first 100 homes, and only five years to add the next 100.  As our numbers continue to grow, it means that more people are able to live full and meaningful lives.  Both the elders who live in Green House homes and those who work there, benefit from the elements of the model that returns value and autonomy to those who it matters to most.“

Exterior of new JKV with 12 homes May 26 2016John Knox Village, a lifecare community in Pompano Beach, Fl represents the 200th Green House home to open.  In May 2016, they opened 12 Green House homes.  Says CEO, Gerry Stryker, of the momentous occasion, “Being the 200th Green House home is incredibly emotional and fulfilling for John Knox Village.  We recognize that we are a part of a rapidly growing national movement to change the face of care and rehabilitation.  Our elders deserve this.”

kitchen_cedar sinaiCedar Sinai Park, in Portland, OR, opened the first of four Green House homes in July, representing the thirtieth state to include this lifestyle model.  Sandra Simon, CEO said, “This is the future of aging services, and we are proud to create the first Green House home in Oregon.”

Research  finds that comprehensive adoption of the model has the potential to impact re-hospitalization rates, end of life care, and the quality of decisions made in the homes.  A strong evidence base makes this model an appealing option to consumers, policymakers and long-term care providers and increases potential for scaling.

The Green House concept has already spread nationwide, with Green House projects operating or in development in 34 states.  The organization’s goal is to increase the pace of growth, and have at least 300 homes open by 2020.

About The Green House Project

Based in Baltimore, MD, The Green House Project promotes an alternative to the traditional institutional skilled nursing, replacing it with an innovative new model of care that balances quality of life with quality of care.  In the Green House model, large nursing facilities are replaced with small, self-contained homes that include private bedrooms and baths, home-cooked meals and access to the outdoors, while meeting all skilled nursing regulatory and reimbursement criteria.  Incorporating the core values of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff, the Green House model creates a higher quality of life, improved medical outcomes, and greater caregiver satisfaction.  There are currently more than 200 Green House homes in 30 states.  The Green House Project is an initiative within the newly formed Center for Innovation. Visit our website at www.thegreenhouseproject.org.


Portrait of a Green House Leader, Joyce Ebmeier

By / Posted on January 29th, 2016

What Does it Mean to Lead Meaningful and Sustainable Change

The “Portrait of a Green House Leader” webinar series continues by highlighting the talents of Joyce Ebmeier, Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning for Tabitha Health Care Services in Lincoln, NE. Tabitha offers a continuum of services to elders, including the first Green House homes in Nebraska and the second built nationally. Joyce attributes her desire to work in elder care to her deep relationship with her grandmother and the wisdom she shared with her growing up. After graduating from the University of Nebraska with a bachelor’s degree in Education, she pursued a career in teaching before beginning her career with Tabitha in 1981, where she served as the administrator of their nursing and rehabilitation center for fourteen years. Currently, as the Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning, she is responsible for directing the overall planning, monitoring, communication, and progress of Tabitha’s business and strategic plan.

Joyce_web

Joyce (right) with her mother

Joyce was inspired to champion the development of Tabitha’s four Green House homes after listening to Dr. Thomas speak about The Green House vision in 2001. As an administrator of a traditional facility, she knew the opportunity to imagine a blank page, and create more of what she knew elder care could be through The Green House model was the next step in writing Tabitha’s future chapters. After sharing the vision, the board approved the development of one Green House home after half the initial funds were raised. Joyce identifies that engaging with a grant writer to help locate available funding sources and network with organizational leaders was a crucial strategy to raise the initial funds for the Martin house, their first Green House home to nine elders. After they demonstrated the success of the model through the Martin house, three more homes were built, with plans to purchase property and build four additional homes in the future.

From a cost perspective, Joyce states that their Green House homes are major contributors to the success of the

Construction of a Green House home on Tabitha's campus

Construction of the Good House

entire company. Specifically, adding Green House homes for long term care into Tabitha’s continuum of services provided an opportunity to expand their capacity for post acute short term rehabilitation in their legacy building. This balance of costs and revenues combined aids in the growth of Tabitha’s entire organization. Further, Joyce describes that the quality of care associated with their Green House homes has become a hallmark within the community that is a “magnet” for people seeking long term care. This high demand results in a reliable, sustainable census that is crucial for overall operational success.

However, Joyce notes that the true success or “magic” of The Green House model comes from the incredible people who live and work in the homes and the culture created to foster deep knowing relationships. “It’s the most important part of getting The Green House model correct. If you don’t have the right people and you don’t provide an environment which empowers them to do their work with the elders… if that doesn’t happen the most beautiful and perfectly designed houses are really a waste of time and money.” At Tabitha, recruiting extremely creative, great people has resulted in

Annual Green House carnival

Annual Green House carnival

unique teams in each home where people feel empowered to bring who they are into their work. This results in extraordinary events and celebrations, such as their annual Green House carnival, and quiet everyday moments of compassion, love, and joy in the homes that couldn’t occur in a traditional setting. For Joyce, when talking about her accomplishments in her career, she identifies working with The Green House Project as the one she’s most proud of, yet is continuously striving for success in providing the highest quality of care for elders. When thinking about her Green House legacy in the future, she hopes it reads “But as remarkable as the Green House model became, what came next from these pioneers in elder care was even better.”

Listen to this recorded webinar interview>>


Lebanon Valley Brethren Home Releases New Video Highlighting Their Green House homes

By / Posted on January 6th, 2016

At Lebanon Valley Brethren Home we believe in empowering our elders and providing innovative ways to care for their needs both in mind, body and spirit. This video is the story about our Green House homes, which are designed to serve those who need the highest level of nursing care.

LVBH

Lebanon Valley Green House home

We decided to tell our story by video for a few different reasons.  First and foremost, we wanted to create a clear and visual way to describe The Green House model to prospective elders and their families.  Because we limit outside visits to preserve the value of ‘real home’,video is another way to create that “seeing is believing” experience.

Additionally, this video is a great way to educate our team, community and stakeholders about The Green House model.   By ensuring that our network understands the value of this model and the life that we are creating at Lebanon Valley Brethren Home, we are looking forward to their support in building more Green House homes in the future.

Thank you for taking the time to watch our video, and if you would like to learn more about our community, please visit our website.

Jeff Shireman is the President and CEO of Lebanon Valley Brethren Home

 


New York Times Highlights The Green House model and Trend toward Small Nursing Homes

By / Posted on November 23rd, 2015

“This is my home,” said Kay Larmor, an elder who currently lives at Porter Hills Green House homes. “And I feel cared for.”

kay larimor

The New York Times recently explored the movement toward smaller nursing home residences, highlighting The Green House Project as the premiere example of this trend, “Green House homes were developed from a blank sheet of paper,” said Scott Brown, Director of Outreach at The Green House Project. The results, he said, have been encouraging. Studies show that residents have higher-quality lives and significantly fewer hospital readmissions.

“This is the way that elders want to be cared for,” said Audrey Weiner, chief executive of Jewish Home Lifecare, who will open 22 Green House homes in Manhattan.  Currently there are 185 Green House homes operating in 28 states; an additional 150 are in development. That compares with about 15,700 nursing homes in the United States housing 1.4 million people.  There is still much work to do to make Green House homes an option for elders in every community.  Whether you are an advocate, provider or developer, visit www.thegreenhouseproject.org to learn how you can get involved.

Read the full article>>

 


Fresh, farmed produce debuts at Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community

By / Posted on October 14th, 2015

October 7, 2015

Contact: Maureen Pearson, director of Communications

540-438-4205, 540-908-8979

Eating locally is a common phrase in the agricultural heavy Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, but for Virginia IMG_4056Mennonite Retirement Community, eating locally took on an entirely new meaning this summer.

The continuing care retirement community cultivated 1 ½ acres of land from its nearby farm for food production. The Farm at Willow Run owned and operated by VMRC began the growing season with an anticipated production yield goal of $24,000.

“Knowing where your food comes from is important, and the nutritional value of fresh produce grown nearby is excellent,” said Eric Phipps, executive chef at VMRC.

Growers used untreated and organic seeds and plants in plantiIMG_3903ng as much as possible, and with the farm just minutes from the retirement community, shipping and delivery were kept to a minimum.

Produce was integrated by Dining Services into soups, salad bars, side dishes, and desserts with excess sold at produce table.

“The feedback from the Heirloom tomato bisque and butternut squash pie was amazing,” said Phipps, who designed the menus to accommodate the garden produce.

Farm fresh produce also was utilized in assisted living activities of bean snapping and zucchini bread baking.

“The farm made good sense for VMRC as we identified ways to help people live a healthier lifestyle,” said Judith Trumbo, president and CEO.IMG_4043

Nearly 750 residents live at VMRC which also is home to Virginia’s only Green House community – Woodland Park.


The Heart of The Home: Elders and Staff

By / Posted on August 28th, 2015

Last year, when Claremont, CA resident Bill Andrus began to need 24-hour care in their home, he and his wife, Georgeann, chose Mt. San Antonio Gardens’ Evergreen Villas for his new home. The Villas are trademarked  GREEN HOUSE homes, which provides a real home for people needing skilled nursing care. In each of the two villas, the residents are supported by a small, self-managed team of care partners, known as shahbazim, and nurses. Mt. San Antonio Gardens pioneered what are California’s first and only small homes licensed for skilled nursing.

“We wanted Bill to live in a stimulating environment while receiving the care he needs,” says Georgeann. Acknowledging the difficulty of making that decision, the couple feels fortunate that the Villas were an option for them. Georgeann, who served on the Gardens board of directors for six years when The Green House homes were being considered, says, “We are so grateful for Bill to be part of it. It has been particularly heartwarming to see this from the initial concept and then to participate in the reality of seeing it work very well.”

Bill and Georgeann Anrus

Bill and Georgeann Anrus

While Bill was settling in, Georgeann applied to live at the Gardens as an active, healthy independent resident. She moved into an apartment on campus where she takes a quick walk to the Evergreen Villas. Living on the same campus means easy and frequent visits each day. The couple goes together to lectures and performances held at the Gardens or at the nearby Claremont Colleges. “Our neurologist had said to me, ‘Now you can just be a spouse, not the caregiver’, and he was so right!”

“Bill has become physically stronger since his move here,” marvels Georgeann. The special design of the great room has inspired Bill to use his walker, unassisted. The couple also credits the home-like atmosphere and the personalized attention of the shahbazim and nurses to his continued well-being. Because this team works so closely with such a small group of elders, the care partners get to know their personalities and individual needs and preferences intimately. While the shahbazim are also responsible for cooking and maintaining the house, their first priority, Georgeann notes, is always the care of the elders.

“The people are the best thing,” says Bill, who especially enjoys sharing common interests with Registered Nurse (RN) Michael Sansosti. Both are avid readers and love fishing.

Michael and Bill Reading for screen only 100 dpi

Bill and Michael reading

“It’s great,” says Michael. “We trade books and when I have some extra time in my schedule, we’ll spend time talking about them.” The ability to give everyone a little extra attention is very gratifying. Michael, who previously worked in structured hospital environments, enjoys the opportunity he now has to cultivate more personal friendships with the residents he cares for. “Certain people, like Bill, do very well in this kind of setting. It is especially well suited to those who prefer to take the initiative for their daily activities” and who enjoy the interaction and activity that is such an important part of the daily experience in the Evergreen Villas, according to Michael.

Working with the caregivers is also a new experience for Michael. “We work side by side with the shahbazim. While the RNs are in charge of everything clinical, the care partners spend all of their time interacting with the residents, so they can give us feedback on their behavior and needs, enabling us to intervene early.”

 

Amanda, shahbaz, and Michael, nurse, work together

Amanda, shahbaz, and Michael, nurse, work together

“Communication is a big thing here,” acknowledges shahbaz Amanda Phos, who began her training for her role long before the Evergreen Villas opened. With just 10 elders in each of the two Evergreen Villas, the care partners get to know each person personally, from their life stories to their health needs and abilities, their food preferences, and their hobbies and interests. “If you know the elders well, taking care of them is very easy,” says Amanda. “I think that’s the beauty of this place. We base each day’s activities on what they individually want to do. And every day is different. When we all come together around the dinner table, we like to talk about the day’s activities. It feels like a family.

 

“It’s hard work, and it takes a team to make it work so well,” says Amanda. “We’re the heart of the home, and that makes it very gratifying to be here.”

 


Short Term Rehab in The Green House Model – A Case Study

By / Posted on August 5th, 2015

Leonard Florence Center for Living

6x7X3CrHokb6SwAIWDKUKSWCpdd6M78Ay_XOPVuW9LcThe Green House model  was originally designed as a long term care solution where  elders could live for the remainder of their lives. Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) has expanded their Green House homes to include three short term rehab homes within their ten home building in Chelsea, MA. In the webinar, Short Term Rehab in the Green House Model – A Case Study, Ina Hoffman, Director of Admissions, and Jill Tura, Director of Rehabilitation, describe how short term rehab can be delivered in a real home environment, and highlight their positive clinical and financial outcomes. Their decision to incorporate short term rehab into their Green House homes outlines how providing this service has made them   a preferred provider in the community and creates a highly attractive environment that increases consumer demand.

In order to provide high quality care to elders and those who living with diseases such as  Multiple Sclerosis or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, LFCL needed to create a financial situation that  would enable them to serve Medicaid recipients, while managing organizational needs.   Incorporating short term rehab into their Green House homes provides financial balance to their building and allows individuals to receive short term CF00eJRB_q1f5bqRESlaGAnrAXs_IbIOBlU-ZcNFcTYorthopedic, cardiopulmonary, neurological, or medical rehabilitation in a real home environment. Currently, LFCL has up to 30 individuals receiving short term rehab at any given time, averaging 45 admissions per month. Through strategic marketing, seeking connections with Boston area hospitals and Accountable Care Organizations, and referrals from elders and their families, they became a choice provider of short term rehab in their community – and a reputation that proves it.

 

“There are not many places that can do what we do.” Ina says when describing short term rehab in a Green House home as an “Occupational Therapist’s dream.” Rather than stimulating home-like environments, functional, practical therapy is provided seven days a week in a real home to ensure maximum safety and success upon discharge. Those who come to LFCL for rehab  practice activities of daily living with their core rehabilitation team in the common areas of the home, while more personal tasks such as bathing, dressing, and toileting can be done in the privacy of their own bedroom and bathroom. The Green House environment fosters a sense of community and family within the home.  The members of the house encourage each other during therapy sessions, discuss therapy goals and frustrations over meals, and exchange telephone numbers when they return to the community to keep in touch beyond their stay. Because LFCL is within the larger Chelsea Jewish Foundation, when a person is ready to transition to in-home care, they can continue to receive therapy from the same core team, allowing for a continuous, efficient transition of care.

 

By incorporatingD_YEvbOIK7ASoF2DEyGTUyKUR795WiRz3exvUwkEzps short-term rehab into their Green House homes, LFCL created a financial strategy that “keeps the building going.” Short-term rehab created an opportunity to stay true to their mission while providing high-quality, integrated care with positive outcomes, including decreased length of stay, higher overall satisfaction, and decreased rehospitalizations.

 

Interested in learning more about short-term rehab in Green House homes? <<Listen to the webinar recording here>> 


Wedding Celebration Honors Generations

By / Posted on July 28th, 2015

Chelsea Jewish Foundation is an innovative organization that has infused meaningful life across all of their communities.  In addition to Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home, they also operate the groundbreaking Leonard Florence Center for Living that includes 10 Green House homes in a high rise structure, serving elders, short term rehabilitation and those living with MS and ALS.  

The Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home’s first wedding in its 96 year history took place on Friday, July 10, 2015. Rose Stetson, a 91 year old resident, truly wanted to see her son Kevin get married and her son couldn’t imagine his mom not being present. What better place for a wedding than Rose’s home at Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home? Kevin and Sharon were married by Sharon’s father, who became a Life Minister and officiated the ceremony. The bride’s daughter, Lexie, was the maid of honor and Rose’s grandson, Tim, was the best man. All in all, it was a wonderful family affair on a beautiful July day.

Stetson-wedding-CJNH

Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home first wedding with Kevin and Sharon Stetson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose-Stetson-with-grandchildren

Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home resident Rose Stetson, 91, and her great-grandchildren.