GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

By / Posted on June 6th, 2017

 

 

For more information, contact:  Susan Ryan
sryan@thegreenhouseproject.org or 703.615.2359

 

 

GREEN HOUSE® PROJECT CONTINUES TO LEAD LONG-TERM CARE TRANSFORMATION WITH NEW $650,000 ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION GRANT

BALTIMORE, MDThe Green House® Project has received a two-year, $650,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to fulfill its mission of redefining—and humanizing—long-term care in the United States.

The Green House Project aims to end the institutionalization of older adults in America. Under this vision, all elders will have the opportunity to live in small, welcoming homes with dignity, autonomy, choice, and the best quality of life possible, while receiving the care they need.

The new RWJF grant will enable Green House Project leaders at the nonprofit Center for Innovation, which recently acquired the Green House trademark and intellectual property, to continue spearheading this movement. They will work with the leading Green House adopters to further refine the model while spreading it across the country.

Additionally, the national initiative plans to expand the impact of the Green House model through a specialized focus on people living with dementia, people in need of short-term rehabilitation services, and other areas of innovation. The Green House Project, the pioneer of the small house model, offers proven clinical and financial outcomes through a comprehensive cultural transformation across the entire organizational system.

“The Green House Project is a dynamic model that continues to evolve as an agile leader in the field,” said Scott Townsley, president of the Center for Innovation. “The success of the Green House Project has catalyzed a community of thought leaders who are discovering new ways to improve the lives of elders. We’re excited to work in partnership with them to change the way people age.”

The Center for Innovation, where the Green House Project is based, was founded by three members of the faculty at The Erickson School, University of Maryland Baltimore County. The Erickson School is the only program in the country offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees in the management of aging services.

The Green House Project launched more than a dozen years ago with the shared vision of its founder, William Thomas, M.D., and RWJF, for transforming long-term care. Today, 231 Green House homes are open and operating, serving elders in 32 states across the country, and another 150 are in the works.

“We owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Thomas for his role in helping to get the Green House Project to where it is today,” said Susan Ryan, senior director of The Green House Project.  “We wish him well in his future endeavors to move the field forward.”

The Green House Project has a solid evidence base. Supported by RWJF, the THRIVE Research Collaborative conducted a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the Green House model.  A team of leading health care and long-term researchers conducted a half-dozen studies that addressed workforce issues, quality of care, cost savings, and culture change.  These studies, all published in the journal Health Services Research, found that:

  • Elders in Green House homes were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, to be bedridden, to need catheters, or to have pressure sores than those in non-Green House homes.
  • Annual inpatient and skilled nursing facility Medicare costs were significantly lower for elders in Green House homes.
  • Caregiving staff in Green House homes spent more time per day with elders than caregiving staff in non-Green House homes.

“The Green House Project is what people want—for themselves and for their loved ones,” said Nancy Barrand, senior adviser for program development at RWJF.  “We want to ensure that every community has a Green House home and that the Green House Project becomes the standard of quality for all nursing care.”

 To learn more about The Green House Project, visit:  thegreenhouseproject.org

 

 

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Morris Hall Meadows Celebrates Grand Opening in New Jersey

By / Posted on November 13th, 2015

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October 21st was a beautiful day for a ribbon cutting ceremony and all those who attended the Morris Hall Meadows Grand Opening couldn’t have been more pleased with the homes and the weather!

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., along with representatives from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Green House Project, local, county and township officials all offered their words of praise and support for the six new skilled nursing Green House homes.  Ten elders will live in each home, which will include their own private bedroom and bath, a central heath area with a fireplace, full kitchen with home cooked meals and a dining area.

“It’s all about leadership — leaders who are willing to push through the status quo, to believe that there is a better way and a different way to grow old in America. It’s about leaders who say, ‘we’re going to defy the ancient stereotypes … and we are going to grab hold of the very best for our elders, and it really fits your mission so well, because it’s all about maximizing the quality of human life.” –Susan Frazier Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project.

IMG_1721One of those leaders for Morris Hall Meadows is the CEO for Morris Hall/St. Lawrence, Inc., Darlene Hanley.  She has been a champion for the project and was most pleased to tell the crowd that day that Lawrence Township has the distinction of having the first Green House homes in central New Jersey.  (Green House Living at Green Hill in West Orange, New Jersey were the first Green House homes in the state.)  The ribbon cutting event was covered by The Monitor in Trenton, New Jersey and includes a photo gallery of the event.

There are now 185 Green House homes across the country in 28 states.


ANNOUNCEMENT: THRIVE Research Results, Coming Soon!

By / Posted on October 14th, 2015

Thrive2The buzz is about to begin !!  The THRIVE research team, which collected information in and about Green House homes and other nursing homes, completed its efforts.

Presentations of the results have been made at meetings of The Green House Project, the Pioneer Network, Advancing Excellence, LeadingAge, the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine, the American Society on Aging, Academy Health, the Gerontological Society of America, and others.

In a few months, the THRIVE results will be published in Health Services Research, one of the top journals that impacts health practice and policy.  So, to repeat:  the “buzz” is about to begin!  2

Publication is expected to generate great interest and discussion among policy makers, providers, investors, and other stakeholders — promoting what works best about Green House homes and informing new practices. Green House webinars will be offered to provide updates along the way. Hold on for the ride!  MORE TO FOLLOW!


The New York Times Features the Green House Model

By / Posted on December 22nd, 2014

Word traveled quickly last week after The New York Times published an article by Jane Brody entitled, “The Green House Effect: Homes for the Elderly to Thrive.” It took only several days after the piece was published to our Facebook page for over 16,000 people to see the article, many of whom liked or shared Brody’s insights with their own social networks.

The author creates a clear and powerful image of the Green House model and its core values with support from interviews with Dr. Bill Thomas and Steve McAlilly, CEO of Mississippi Methodist Senior Services in Tupelo, MS. By showing readers that Green House homes provide Elders with a nurturing and respectful environment where they can continue to thrive, Brody exposes the “medicalization of old age” that many of the 1.5 million Americans living and working in nursing homes experience each day.

Today, nearly 2,000 Elders across the nation are living in Green House homes in partnership with caring Shahbazim, clinical support teams and families. The swell of national recognition that we have received over the past year is a clear indication that the Green House model is well positioned to experience rapid growth and adoption in the new year as Americans embrace the power of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff as they age.


Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Abstract, Green House Nursing Homes: Impact and Outcomes, Honored as the 2014 Ollie Randall Symposium

By / Posted on November 7th, 2014

The Gerontological Society of America’s 67th Annual Scientific Meeting is going on now, from November 5 to November 9. “GSA’s Annual Scientific Meeting brings together more than 4,000 of the brightest minds in the field of aging,” and recognized the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s session entitled Green House Nursing Homes: Impact and Outcomes as the 2014 Ollie Randall Symposium. Every year, the Gerontological Society of America‘s Social Research Policy and Practice (SRPP) “recognizes a symposium that examines cutting edge issues with broad implications for policy or practice.”

Ollie Randall was influential in the field of aging.  “She was the driving force behind the first housing for older people in New York City” and was President of The Gerontological Society. She was known as being outspoken on the issues of “sustaining and enhancing individuality in the later years.” The GREEN HOUSE® Project represents what Ms. Randall stood for by offering “services that were individualized and tailored to meet the diverse needs of elders.”

This year’s meeting theme “challenges researchers to present their best evidence on aging-related connections they investigate, ranging from the smallest particles examined in the lab to the most macro-level issues examined globally.”  The GREEN HOUSE® Project embodies this mission by offering an evidence based model as an alternative to institutional nursing homes.


Data Collection for THRIVE Projects is Now Complete

By / Posted on October 31st, 2014

The Green House Project has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) collaborative to learn more about the Green House model as well as other models of care. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the THRIVE team is conducting a series of interrelated research projects that together will comprise the largest research effort undertaken to date in Green House homes. Each quarter, a member of the THRIVE team will contribute a blog post to the Green House Project website.

Data collection for the THRIVE projects is now complete, and the research team is analyzing the results.  The THRIVE team will share research findings in upcoming articles in a special issue of the journal Health Services Research, and through conference and webinar presentations and blog posts.  In 2014, conference presentations will include those at annual meetings of LeadingAge (October), and the Gerontological Society of America, and the Green House (both in November).  This blog post is part of our series devoted to explaining research terms so that non-researchers can better understand these articles, presentations, and posts.  This post focuses on quantitative research – research based in numbers – and explains the important topic of “significance.”

Quantitative research findings are often discussed in terms of their statistical significance.  What does it mean to say a finding is significant?

Let’s consider an example.   A researcher thinks that there may be more female than male elders living in Green House homes.  This hunch is called a hypothesis.  The researcher visits all the Green House homes in the state, tallies the numbers of females (85) and males (15) and performs a statistical test to compare males and females.  The statistical test will result in a p-value (probability value) expressing whether the difference is large enough to indicate that it isn’t just by chance.

 

To better understand what it means to have a “large enough” difference, think of it this way:  if the number of females was 52, and the number of males was 48, the difference between these numbers is pretty small, and it’s not likely statistically significant.  The question is, is the difference between 85 and 15 large enough to suggest that there are statistically more females than males living in Green House homes?  A difference of 85 to 15 is probably large enough to not be by chance (i.e., it is statistically significant), whereas a difference of 52 to 48 is so small that it quite likely occurred by chance.

It’s also important to realize that findings that are statistically significant may not be clinically significant.  Clinical significance means that the information is important for clinical care.  In terms of care, does it matter that there are more females than males residing in Green House homes?  It does matter, for example, if women tend to be more depressed than men, or to have more family members.  However, if there are no clinical implications related to the difference, than they are statistically, but not clinically, significant.

The bottom line is that it’s important to carefully consider the meaning of all findings, and use your knowledge and judgment to interpret when differences matter and when they don’t.

Stay tuned for the next THRIVE blog post.  In the meantime, if you have questions about this post, or suggestions for future ones, please let us know.

Questions about THRIVE can be directed to Lauren Cohen (lauren_cohen@unc.edu or 919-843-8874).


Grand Opening Celebration Takes Place for Colorado’s First Green House Homes – A Story of Partnership and Vision

By / Posted on October 25th, 2014

The beautiful Rocky Mountains provide a wonderful view for Elders that will live in The Green House Homes at Mirasol in Loveland, Colorado.  That view will only be matched by the person-directed living they will experience in this innovative model of skilled nursing care.  Built on the campus of the Mirasol Senior Living Community, there will be six homes with each including: ten private bedrooms and bath, open kitchen, a hearth area along with a variety of other open spaces that will embrace socializing and the ability to live life in a meaningful way.

Sam Betters, Executive Director of the Loveland Housing Authority, said,

From my own personal experience of trying to provide the best care for my parents, I discovered that aging in America presents many challenges.  I knew that there had to be a better option than the traditional institutional models for elder care.  There is.  It’s called The Green House Project.  As we began our vision-quest, we didn’t know how we were going to make this happen.  We just knew it had to be done.

Senior Director for The Green House Project, David Farrell, was on hand for the festivities on October 21st along with a number of other state and local leaders in Colorado.

David said, “These homes will help the Loveland Housing Authority meet a gap in its continuum of care-skilled nursing and allow Mirasol residents to remain a part of their existing community, deriving the benefits of receiving a higher level of care while still living independent and social lives.”

The Green House Project is part of Capital Impact Partners, a certified community development financial institution, which led the financing for this $17 million dollar project.

As a mission driven lender, this project fits well into our larger strategy to build strong, vibrant communities of opportunity for underserved populations. We are not only proud to help bring the Green House model to Colorado, but also the fact that a large percentage of the residents are Medicaid eligible,

said Terry Simonette, CEO of Capital Impact Partners. “It took a number of partners, and use of innovative tools like New Market Tax Credits to make this happen.”

Funding for the project included:  $2 million dollar grant from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, program related investments from the AARP Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $2.5 million New Market Tax Credits, $3.4 million in tax credit equity from JPMorgan Chase plus a land donation by the Loveland Housing Authority.

We congratulate all who helped in the process of making these homes possible…and welcome everyone to the Green House family!

Click here to read more about this project and why leaders from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and the AARP Foundation were most pleased to make this development a reality!


First Green House Homes in Minnesota Officially Open!

By / Posted on July 8th, 2014

Despite the long winter and flooding in Minnesota this year…the ribbon cutting ceremony at Water’s Edge on June 26th was a real success.  The first Green House homes located in Mankato, Minnesota will be welcoming Elders in mid-July.  Congratulations to all!

The three story project, with an assisted living Green House home on each floor, was developed and will be operated by Grace Senior Services.  Owners, Brad and Heather Bass along with their children and other city officials were all on hand for the grand opening event.

Water’s Edge is located on the Mankato hilltop and will offer wonderful scenic waterfront and woodland views.  Of course every Green House home also offers private bedroom and bathrooms for Elders, a central hearth area, full kitchen with home cooked meals, and a dining room area.  It can be chilly during those Minnesota winters, so Water’s Edge will also include heated bathroom floors and a “four-season sun porch” for each home.

The Director of Operations for Water’s Edge will be Brooke Olson.  The initial team to staff the first home is currently receiving their 128 hours of additional training to their current certification as a nurse, licensed practical nurse or nursing assistant.

The supplemental training is a hallmark of The Green House model of care.  The people who live and work in a Green House home collaborate to create a flexible daily routine that meets and Elder’s needs and preferences.  If they wish, Elders can help cook, and assist with housekeeping or laundry.  There is no predetermined routine, which facilitates independence and an Elder’s ability to pursue individual interests and schedules.  Deep relationships between the Elders and staff are one reason that the Green House model creates dramatic improvements in quality of life and care.

Capital Impact Partners was critical in the development and funding of Water’s Edge.  They provided $1.5 million in financing for the project:  One million from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s program-related investment (PRI) and $500,000 from the AARP Foundation PRI funds.  Capital Impact Partners, a congressionally chartered, non-profit community development finance institution provides financial services and technical assistance nationwide to help make high-quality health care, healthy foods, housing and education more accessible and attainable, and eldercare more dignified and respectful.  Water’s Edge owner Brad Bass was most pleased to work with Capital Impact Partners, “You have a great program and excellent staff.  I could never have done this without all of your extensive resources!  Not to mention the funding that was really the igniter to get this development going”.

We wish the team at Water’s Edge only the best as they welcome their Elders into the Green House homes during the upcoming weeks!  Again, congratulations to all!


THRIVE: Understanding the Language of Research

By / Posted on June 30th, 2014

The Green House Project has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) collaborative to learn more about the Green House model as well as other models of care. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the THRIVE team is conducting a series of interrelated research projects that together will comprise the largest research effort undertaken to date in Green House homes. Each quarter, a member of the THRIVE team will contribute a blog post to the Green House Project website.

As the THRIVE research projects head toward completion later this year, our research team has developed plans to share our research findings.  In addition to publishing articles in a special issue of the journal, Health Services Research, we also will share findings through conference and webinar presentations and blog posts.

Because some commonly used research terms may sound like jibberish to non-researchers (after all, who really knows what a p-value is?), we will devote our next few blog posts to explaining a few terms that will help non-researchers better understand the THRIVE articles, presentations, and posts.  We’ll start by reviewing Quantitative and Qualitative research designs.

When people think of research, they’re usually thinking of a Quantitative research design, which essentially measures and compares things.  Quantitative research asks questions like “How many residents in one nursing home have falls compared to residents in another?” or “Does providing one type of care work better than providing a different type of care?”  A quantitative research design allows a researcher to establish “how much”, whether one thing is related to another (such as whether falls are less frequent when certain care is provided), and also – depending on the details of the design – to establish cause and effect.  The data collected are usually in numerical form, and findings are expressed in terms including percents, means, and p-values (to answer the earlier question, a p-value denotes whether or not a number is or isn’t significantly ‘different’ from another…..we’ll come back to this in a future blog post).

Qualitative research designs essentially answer “how” and “why”.  Qualitative research asks questions such as “Why are so many falls occurring?” or “What conditions are necessary for a nursing home to provide a certain type of care?”  A qualitative research design permits a researcher to better understand events and the circumstances under which they occur and vary.  The information gathered in these types of studies are usually textual, and include the researchers notes and observations, as well as in-depth interviews and quotes from people who have knowledge of the event being studied.  This information is analyzed by looking for common themes across all of the information collected and reporting these findings – often contextualized using exemplative quotes.

The THRIVE team is using both quantitative and qualitative methods in their research, which is considered mixed-methods.  This is the best of both worlds, and is allowing us to answer questions such as:

Quantitative:    What was the annual turnover rate for shahbazim over the past two years?
Was this turnover rate statistically different (higher or lower) than that found
among CNAs in other nursing homes?

Qualitative:      What was the role of the Director of Nursing in the Green House homes?
How might variations in this role relate to shahbazim turnover?

Stay tuned for the next THRIVE blog post.  In the meantime, if you have questions about this post, or suggestions for future ones, please let us know.

Questions about THRIVE can be directed to Lauren Cohen (lauren_cohen@unc.edu or 919-843-8874).


Early Research Findings from THRIVE

By / Posted on March 26th, 2014

The Green House Project has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) collaborative to learn more about the Green House model as well as other models of care. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the THRIVE team is conducting a series of interrelated research projects that together will comprise the largest research effort undertaken to date in Green House homes. Each quarter, a member of the THRIVE team will contribute a blog post to the Green House Project website.

Early findings from the THRIVE research collaborative were published in The February 2014 Gerontologist supplement, Transforming Nursing Home Culture: Evidence for Practice and Policy, a themed issue providing evidence to inform practice and policy related to culture change.  The full articles can be accessed at http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/54/Suppl_1.toc and are summarized here.

A paper entitled “A “Recipe” for Culture Change? Findings from the THRIVE Survey of culture change Adopters” provided information from a survey that assessed which components of culture change – and in what combinations – have been adopted by nursing homes.  The survey was completed by 164 nursing homes that had already adopted culture change.  Results showed that adopted components of culture change varied across the type of nursing home model (i.e., small house, household, traditional unit).  As one example, respondents from small houses reported a significantly higher rate of direct care workers preparing meals (79%), but these were some of the least adopted practices for other adopters (22% of households and 13% of traditional units).  Results also showed that some traditional environments have been able to implement certain culture change components without large capital investments.  For instance, respondents reported similar rates of practices related to educational support and quality improvement regardless the nursing home model.  Taken together, these findings suggest that although practices do vary by model, some components of culture change are attainable for homes that have fewer resources to invest in large-scale renovations or reorganization.

A paper entitled “Who are the Innovators? Nursing Homes Implementing Culture Change” focused on the organizational factors associated with culture change implementation.  Using a sophisticated analytic process, information from 16,835 nursing homes was used to determine which resident, facility, and state characteristics related to a nursing home later being identified by experts as having implemented culture change.   These characteristics included being nonprofit, larger in size, and with fewer Medicaid and Medicare residents. Implementers also had better baseline quality with fewer health-related survey deficiencies and greater licensed practical nurse and nurse aide staffing. These findings suggest that nursing homes are in a better position to implement culture change if they start out with more resources and fewer challenges.   In a related article entitled “Culture Change and Nursing Home Quality of Care”, analyses examined how culture change implementation related to later nursing home quality.  This study found that nursing homes identified as culture change adopters later had fewer health-related survey deficiencies, but there was no improvement in the MDS-based metrics of quality.  These finding may suggest that culture change improves nursing home processes of care, and/or that surveyors recognized the homes’ culture change efforts in their ratings.  The lack of impact on MDS outcomes may suggest that either the early focus of such efforts has not been on clinical outcomes, or that because nursing homes adopting culture change already had better outcomes, there was less room for improvement.

Finally, a paper entitled “Developing the Green House Nursing Care Team: Variations on Development and Implementation” explored the roles of the nurse and the Shahbazim in the Green House model, focusing on how variations in the nursing team related to clinical care practices. Data were collected through observations and interviews with nurses, Shahbazim, Guides, and Directors of Nursing, and found that implementation of the nursing role within the Green House model varied both within and across sites.  Four nursing model types were identified: Traditional (nurse manages both care and non-care activities); Parallel (nurse manages care, Shahbaz manage non-care activities); Integrated (nurse and Shahbaz collaboratively manage care and non-care activities); and Visitor (Shahbaz manage care and non-care activities, with input from nurse as requested).  Care processes, Shahbaz skill development, and worker stress varied across each model, and although the Integrated model presents considerable challenges in terms of clarifying boundaries, it seemed to offer the greatest benefits in the areas addressed in this study.  

The THRIVE team will be expanding upon these and other findings in 2014, and will be sharing those with you and others via conference presentations, webinars, blog posts, and more journal articles.  As always, we invite your feedback about the best ways to keep you informed of the latest findings.

Questions about THRIVE can be directed to Lauren Cohen (lauren_cohen@unc.edu or 919-843-8874).

 


THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) Update on Green House Homes

By / Posted on January 27th, 2014

The Green House Project has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s THRIVE (The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare) collaborative to learn more about the Green House model as well as other models of care. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the THRIVE team is conducting a series of interrelated research projects that together will comprise the largest research effort undertaken to date in Green House homes. Each quarter, a member of the THRIVE team will contribute a blog post to the Green House Project website.
The THRIVE research team is committed to the timely dissemination of findings relevant to The Green House Project homes and stakeholders.  Members of the THRIVE team recently presented preliminary research findings at the 2013 Green House meeting and in a January 2014 webinar.  Highlights from these presentations include:

David Grabowski (Harvard Medical School) debunked several common myths about The Green House model.  Using administrative data, David’s presentation showed that although higher resource nursing homes are more likely to adopt the Green House model than are lower resource nursing homes, these lower resource homes can be successful adopters with adequate vision and internal and external support.  His data also looked at culture change more generally, and found that culture change homes perform better on survey inspections — in fact, they lowered their health-related survey deficiencies by almost 15%!  David’s findings appear in the February issue of The Gerontologist journal:

Culture Change and Nursing Home Quality of Care

Who Are the Innovators?  Nursing Homes Implementing Culture Change

Lauren Cohen (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) presented data comparing the characteristics of Green House, higher culture change, and lower culture change nursing homes.  Interviews with guides and administrators found that a greater proportion of Green House homes offer resident choice in bedtime and get-up time, but not in bath time.  Lauren noted that previous research has shown that the desire for choice is not universal, and that predictability may be most important.  Her data also showed that Green House homes were less likely than culture change nursing homes to offer prescheduled daily activities, but were more likely to empower caregivers to lead activities.  So, it remains essential that empowered caregivers offer activities and encourage participation.

Kim Nolet (University of Wisconsin – Madison) reviewed the variations in how the Green House model is being implemented across homes, and discussed the implications of this variation.  Kim described variations in several Green House elements, including the role of the Shahbazim and the use of the den.  Her presentation suggested that model variations occur due to the challenges presented by critical events, organizational changes, daily routines, and subtle evolution in how things are done in Green Houses.  These challenges lead to problem-solving that sometimes results in reinforcement of the model and its core values, and other times in practices that are inconsistent with the core values of the model.

The THRIVE team will be expanding upon these and other findings in 2014.  We have planned conference presentations, webinars, blog posts, and journal articles to communicate our findings to you and others, and invite your feedback about the best ways to keep you informed of the latest findings.

Questions about THRIVE can be directed to Lauren Cohen (lauren_cohen@unc.edu or 919-843-8874).


Happy New Year! THE GREEN HOUSE® Project has some special resolutions for 2014

By / Posted on December 31st, 2013

The beginning of a new year always brings a sense of excitement…a chance to reflect on our accomplishments…a chance to strategize about what improvements can be designed to further our mission or goals in life.  As I turned the day calendar on my desk this morning, I believe the message was perfect:  If we celebrate the years behind us they become stepping stones of strength and joy for the years ahead.

After celebrating our 10th Anniversary in 2013, The Green House Project team and our adopters are most anxious to start our 2nd decade off with a renewed energy to spread the good news about The Green House model and the high quality of care and service that it provides to Elders.

To attain that goal, we’ll certainly be “on the road” with our message at a number of conferences including Impact Texas, AHCA Independent Owners, Environments for Aging and a variety of LeadingAge state conferences including Aging Services of Minnesota in February.  It is especially exciting to speak in Minnesota because, in 2014 our first homes in that state will open in Mankato.

There is also a very special nationwide tour combining the talents of Dr. Bill Thomas, The Green House Project, and others in the works…but you’ll just have to wait to hear more about that in the coming months!

We are also resolving this year to further enhance our Green House workshops, Green House overview webinars and to provide that critical financial information through a series of webinars beginning in February.

We feel strongly that our Peer Network is a huge part of our value proposition.  This group has made significant strides over the past 12 months, and the outlook for 2014 is exciting.  A robust schedule of educational webinars, exclusive to Green House adopters, is already planned through the first quarter of the year. Organizations who have adopted this model, learn about a variety of topics and share best practices, not only with industry leaders, but with their peers.  We will work together to continuously enhance the opportunities to learn, grow and thrive as a movement.  

Our education programs are a critical element in making a successful Green House home, and we are committed to expanding and deepening this imperative offering. Through careful evaluations and Peer Network support, in 2014 we will begin working on additional modules of education for the leaders of our adopting organizations and for the new team members in Green House homes.

Of course with the generous support of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other partners we are working on a number of special projects.  Stay connected to our website, facebook and twitter to for the latest details!

They say that culture change is a journey without a destination, and at The Green House Project we embrace this concept.  Every year we resolve to learn more by working with all of you, to create a world where Elders are seen as creative, resourceful and whole.