Green House Blog

New York Times Highlights The Green House model and Trend toward Small Nursing Homes

“This is my home,” said Kay Larmor, an elder who currently lives at Porter Hills Green House homes. “And I feel cared for.”

kay larimor

The New York Times recently explored the movement toward smaller nursing home residences, highlighting The Green House Project as the premiere example of this trend, “Green House homes were developed from a blank sheet of paper,” said Scott Brown, Director of Outreach at The Green House Project. The results, he said, have been encouraging. Studies show that residents have higher-quality lives and significantly fewer hospital readmissions.

“This is the way that elders want to be cared for,” said Audrey Weiner, chief executive of Jewish Home Lifecare, who will open 22 Green House homes in Manhattan.  Currently there are 185 Green House homes operating in 28 states; an additional 150 are in development. That compares with about 15,700 nursing homes in the United States housing 1.4 million people.  There is still much work to do to make Green House homes an option for elders in every community.  Whether you are an advocate, provider or developer, visit www.thegreenhouseproject.org to learn how you can get involved.

Read the full article>>

 

Congratulations to Rebecca Priest, St. John’s Administrator Named in Top 40 Under 40 by Rochester Business Journal in New York

rebecca headshotMany of you have probably heard Rebecca Priest on a Green House webinar or have seen her presentations at Annual Green House meetings…so it comes as no surprise that the business community in Rochester, New York selected her as one of their honorees.

More than 800 folks attended the 21st annual Rochester Business Journal 40 under 40 luncheon on November 19th.  The event is designed to celebrate leaders younger than 40 years old who demonstrate real leadership skills in their workplace.RBJ 40 under 40

Rebecca was the first Guide for the two Green House homes in Penfield, New York.   The Penfield homes are part of St. John’s Living.  The homes were the first to be built in an established community away from the main legacy nursing home.

We congratulate Rebecca on this wonderful honor and look forward to her continued success in the field of aging!

Portrait of a Green House Leader, Terry Rogers

Terry Rogers, President & CEO of Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, in Birmingham, AL was recently highlighted in The Green House Project‘s Leadership webinar series. His organization includes, St. Martin’s in the Pines, a continuing care retirement community and home care service in Birmingham, with nine Green House cottages.

terry and elderTerry’s inspiration for a career in health came from observing his mother as caregiver to family members and neighbors, graduate from nursing school, and enter the home health profession. After graduating from The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Terry began his healthcare administration career in business and operations positions with home health agencies, hospitals, and the Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, where he has served as President & CEO since 2000. In addition, he serves as a member of the Community Advisory Committee for the University of Alabama Comprehensive Center on Healthy Aging, the National Public Policy Congress, the Budget and Finance Committee, and the Business Strategy Council for LeadingAge, in addition to his service as member of the Green House Project Peer Network Steering Committee.

Terry began his career with St. Martin’s with a formal long range planning effort aimed at redeveloping the campus and replacing the skilled nursing building. His colleague, Linda Robertson, an Eden Alternative Associate, directed him towards the work of The Green House Project in Tupelo, Mississippi. After attending a workshop in Tupelo, he returned to Birmingham to inform the board about this innovative model of care and identify what a new nursing home may look like on their campus. Terry describes that seeing truly is believing; the enthusiasm for the model carried throughout the board and to the broader community and together they were committed to developing the first Green House homes in Alabama. He attributes this success to formally engaging with The Green House Project team to aid in the collaborative design process of their multi-story Green House homes and assist in overcoming regulatory hurdles by training state regulators about the Green House model.

st. martins_ shovelsDuring the development process, Terry notes that “we had a steep hill to climb” but felt confident given the robust training opportunities provided by The Green House Project team and the value of being associated with the model given the research supporting its success. He continues to be an advocate for the model integrity process and the importance of the Green House trademark as a method of accountability throughout the Peer Network to ensure the original guiding principles are instilled in every community. “We didn’t get into The Green House model because it was easy, we got into this because it was the right thing. Changing in the right way is why we’re having the outcomes we’re having. If we start letting “the right way” be diluted, the outcomes are going to change… we think The Green House model works and we want to do it in the right way and we want everyone in the Peer Network to do it the right way as well.”

At St. Martin’s, continuing team education is key in maintaining the integrity of the model and helps leadership “keep it fresh.” Terry describes that continuing assessment and evaluation creates an opportunity for leaders to revisit the beginnings of why they started and to continually engage in action plans for improvements. As the “keepers of the philosophy”, leaders must problem solve, motivate, and coach their teams through consistent messaging of the model. Since opening, St. Martin’s aims to serve as a role model and brand ambassador to encourage and invigorate The Green House model into future organizations and help them throughout their journey.

Upon opening, Terry observed the model’s financial success as a result of the shift in operational cost structure and the flattened hierarchy that creates a “middle management shake-up.” Furthermore, adding Green House cottages into the St. Martin’s continuum of care created a competitive advantage that drives demand at all levels of care, resulting in a corresponding increase in their assisted living and independent living occupancy of approximately 5%. This influx of revenue allows St. Martin’s to promote the community giveback component of their mission to ensure that Elders have the opportunity to live in their cottages regardless of their payor status.

In terms of quality of care, Terry describes that “there’s a little bit of magic taking place” in their Green House cottages that yields better outcomes. Specifically, their 100% occupancy rate, higher family satisfaction survey scores, and positive clinical outcomes are a result of better, deeper knowing in their Green House homes. The Green House principles “just makes sense.” Despite the Green House model’s success at St. Martin’s, Terry notes that they can always do better and are constantly seeking improvements. He is pleased to be a part of the Peer Network and associated with other courageous change agents that are never satisfied in knowing all they need to know in caring for elders.

A lifelong resident of Birmingham, Terry loves fishing, Crimson Tide football (Roll Tide!), participating in barbecue competitions, and spending as much time as possible by the lake with his family. He is presenting at the 2015 Annual Meeting with Green House Project team members Susan Frazier and Marla DeVries on the Model Enrichment Resource and Integrity Tool (MERIT) and the research that supports this process for sustainability.  To hear the full interview>>

Saint Elizabeth Community’s Groundbreaking, First in Rhode Island

saint e ground breakingFor the first time since Rhode Island imposed a moratorium on additional nursing home beds nearly 20 years ago, a state approved project is getting underway in East Greenwich.  Saint Elizabeth Home broke ground on October 27th and will build four Green House homes.

“It has been a long road to get to today,” said Steven J. Horowitz, President and CEO of Saint Elizabeth Community. steve horwitz“We first heard about Green House homes in 2006, but it all began in earnest for our organization in 2009 when we took a group of our nursing home resident on an overnight beach vacation to Cape Cod.” Horowitz says, “This showed us how quality of life for nursing home residents could greatly be enhanced through smaller home environments and empowered/cross trained employees.”

Each home will have 12 Elders and will be built next to the existing Saint Elizabeth Home.  They will include private bedrooms and bath, along with a common hearth and dining area and open kitchen.  There will be a front porch and back patio area for easy access by the elders.

From left:  Steven J. Horowitz, President and CEO; Susan Frazier Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project;  Matthew Trimble, Chief Operating Officer.
From left: Steven J. Horowitz, President and CEO; Susan Frazier Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project; Matthew Trimble, Chief Operating Officer.

matt at podiumAt the ground breaking, Saint Elizabeth Home Chief Operating Officer Matthew Trimble said, “the unfortunate consequence of the moratorium was the stifling of innovation.” In 2010 legislation was passed that would allow for beds from skilled nursing facilities that closed, or that were taken out of use, to be held by the RI Department of Health for potential future use. It opened the door for innovation and the team at the Saint Elizabeth Home was more than ready to present their ideas!

Click here to read their press release and the Warwick Beacon also covered the special event!

Morris Hall Meadows Celebrates Grand Opening in New Jersey

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October 21st was a beautiful day for a ribbon cutting ceremony and all those who attended the Morris Hall Meadows Grand Opening couldn’t have been more pleased with the homes and the weather!

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., along with representatives from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Green House Project, local, county and township officials all offered their words of praise and support for the six new skilled nursing Green House homes.  Ten elders will live in each home, which will include their own private bedroom and bath, a central heath area with a fireplace, full kitchen with home cooked meals and a dining area.

“It’s all about leadership — leaders who are willing to push through the status quo, to believe that there is a better way and a different way to grow old in America. It’s about leaders who say, ‘we’re going to defy the ancient stereotypes … and we are going to grab hold of the very best for our elders, and it really fits your mission so well, because it’s all about maximizing the quality of human life.” –Susan Frazier Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project.

IMG_1721One of those leaders for Morris Hall Meadows is the CEO for Morris Hall/St. Lawrence, Inc., Darlene Hanley.  She has been a champion for the project and was most pleased to tell the crowd that day that Lawrence Township has the distinction of having the first Green House homes in central New Jersey.  (Green House Living at Green Hill in West Orange, New Jersey were the first Green House homes in the state.)  The ribbon cutting event was covered by The Monitor in Trenton, New Jersey and includes a photo gallery of the event.

There are now 185 Green House homes across the country in 28 states.

LeadingAge Conference 2015 Highlights

 

IMG_1331The LeadingAge Conference last week in Boston was attended by over 8,000 participants!  It is one of the largest conference for aging services professionals.  The Green House Project team attends every year and also participates as an exhibitor.   We enjoyed seeing many of our Green House adopters and friends in long term care.

Enjoy the story below from Dr. Eleanor Barbera of McKnight’s, she visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living Green House homes and has written about The Green House Project in the past.

via: McKnight’s

Despite the diversity of the events I attended during my brief visit to the LeadingAge convention in Boston last week, a theme clearly emerged. The thread that ran through the varied offerings was well-being.

Retaining staff

In researcher and consultant Joanne L. Smikle, PhD‘s talk on staff retention, rather than focusing on why employees are leaving, she looked instead at why they stay.

Based on her studies of long-term care organizations, she found that “if the leadership of the organization lacks passion, you will have trouble with retention and commitment.”

Click here to continue reading.