Green House Blog

We Thought It Was Time for a Podcast that Elevates Eldercare: So We Made One!

The Green House Project has launched a podcast! It’s called Elevate Eldercare and we hope you will listen, as well as subscribe, so you can hear it each Wednesday and Friday on your favorite platform (Apple, Stitcher, or Spotify). On Wednesdays, Senior Director Susan Ryan brings enlightening,  Marla and Mary
provocative, and sometimes uncomfortable conversations with thought leaders who offer diverse perspectives aimed at elevating eldercare.

On Fridays, Director of Resource Development Marla DeVries and Project Manager Mary Hopfner-Thomas present “Let Me Say This About That,” a quick and witty recap episode that we asked Marla and Mary to explain here:

Marla: “Clifton Keith Hillegass is a hero of mine, even though I was unaware of his name until today (thank you Google). However, I was very familiar with his work. Clifton, a college graduate who worked at a campus bookstore in Nebraska in the 1950s, met Jack Cole, the publisher of the Canadian study guides, Cole’s Notes. Cole suggested to Hillegass that American students would welcome a U.S. version of his eponymously named publication. In 1958, CliffsNotes launched with 16 Shakespeare study guides. He sold 58,000 copies that first year.

“In the late 1980s CliffsNotes was a lifesaver to this high school student. I loved the bite-sized summary and identification of key themes. Certainly, there were times I didn’t read the original work, but often, oh okay, sometimes, I read the book and reviewed the CliffsNotes, as they helped me think through things on a deeper level.

“So, with a nod to Clifton, we are happy to bring you “Let Me Say This About That,” a CliffsNotes version of our newly launched Elevate Eldercare podcast. Each Wednesday, GHP Senior Director Susan Ryan brings us a captivating interview with a thought leader as they discuss relevant and often provocative topics. Each Friday, Mary and I highlight key aspects of the discussion; things that stick out to us as especially important.

“I love words and often look up their definitions, so you’ll likely hear me throw in some vocab review as well. We will also add in some additional facts, bits of our own research, and things we’ve learned in our combined 44 years in long-term care, such as key aspects of the Green House model and how they can be applied to other settings.”

Mary: “So, if you’re wondering why our Friday CliffNotes episodes are called ‘Let Me Say This About That,’ I can assure you it was not in the initial list of potential names: ‘Reflection Friday,’ ‘Rising Up,’ ‘Like It Is,’ and ‘In Our Words’ were among the contenders. For me, the title is all about passion concerning a topic. In fact, I am inclined to emphasize the words this and that for the title.

“My colleagues are well aware of how I use the statement when we are in a team meeting discussing options about a certain topic. I will start off by saying, ‘well, let me say this about that!’ And to be honest, often I say it with a little attitude. It’s my way of highlighting what I see as the issue and what I see as an option to improve the situation.

“When I emailed Marla to suggest it as one name for the podcast it was almost done in jest. Yet, now when I think about it the name resonates. The show reflects our passion about what hits in the Wednesday episodes, and we want to share that with our audience.”

Marla: “I don’t have the broadcast experience my friend Mary does. But my roots are deep in advocacy, cutting my teeth as a long-term care ombudsman. And I love how Susan describes the podcast as an opportunity to speak up and speak out about real issues. I hope we do that.

“Although we don’t have the answers and it’s not a polished, perfect presentation, we will raise the issues and wrestle through complicated topics. In addition, we will keep our eye on practical ways to take action, in ways that we might not only think differently, but also do differently.

“We will also have some fun along the way. Mary and I enjoy working together, we are quick to laugh, and we both have a passion for transforming eldercare—one person and one system at a time. We hope you enjoy, ‘Let Me Say This About That,’ and join us in wrestling through these timely, thought-provoking, and action-invoking issues.”

Listen to the original Elevate Eldercare podcast each Wednesday then join us on Fridays for “Let Me Say This About That.”

Listen here on Apple Podcast:
https://podcasts.apple.com/…/elevate-eldercare/id1524700411…

Listen on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/53ldGsdYWxd6W6eD8xz4kx

Listen on Stitcher here: https://www.stitcher.com/podc…/elevate-eldercare/e/76428729…

Awe and Gratitude Amid COVID-19

Audrey Weiner
Audrey Weiner
Former President & CEO
The New Jewish Home

On behalf of the entire Board of Directors, Vice Chair Audrey Weiner delivered some very heartfelt remarks to Green House partners last week as they gathered virtually to share updates about their work during the COVID-19 pandemic. We thought her very eloquent words were worth sharing with everyone, as her message applies across all of senior living:

“First, good afternoon or good morning to each of you. And many thanks for taking time out of your day. Each day, I am sure, is becoming increasingly more complex for each of you.

“My message, on behalf of the board of directors, is really a very simple one. It is one of awe and gratitude to each of you for all that you are doing.

“While we have all lived through uncertainty and crises, hurricanes and tornadoes, horrible fires, economic downturns, blackouts and civil unrest, September 11th, flu, SARS, H1N1, and for some, the AIDS crisis, nothing in my view has prepared us for this pandemic. We are simultaneously desperately wanting to do the right thing for elders, the individuals who work in our organizations, our volunteers, and the community, while also being concerned about our families, knowing that the demands across communities are extraordinary and complex.

“In some cases, some of you have parents who are older and in at-risk groups. In other cases, you have children who are concerned that you are going to work every day and what you might bring home. There are new babies, new grandchildren, and every day, greater unknowns.

“There are the realities of supplies, concerns about the shortages of medications and antibiotics, challenges in physician visits, challenges in providing rehab, and attempts by government to do the right thing around telehealth, testing, and survey. There are heartbreaking stories about visitors restricted amid moments of death.

“But what is clear to me is that the values of The Green House Project, the ways in which living, care, and relationships are structured in Green House homes, provide what seems like the strongest framework for the best outcomes.

“As I read about nursing homes around the country, especially in the state of Washington, and the surprise on the part of the press that staff are rotating throughout facilities, the issue of inadequate staff, staff working in multiple facilities and multiple shifts, I wonder if anyone has really been listening to the concerns about providing the best possible care of elders.

“I do hope, on a macro level, that there are lessons we will learn as part of this pandemic, and hopefully there will be lessons that allow us to strengthen the long-term care system not only in America, but around the world.

“So, I end where I began, which is with awe and inspiration for all you are doing every day and how you are juggling myriad responsibilities. On behalf of the board, we are endlessly grateful for your intellect, your heart, your inspiration, and your values.

“Please know that we want to be there for you in any way we can be helpful. Above all, please do try to take time to care of yourselves.”

GHP’s Wiegand Serves as Juror in Design for Aging Competition

The Green House Project’s very own Deborah Wiegand recently served as a judge in the 2019 Environments for Aging (EFA) Design Showcase competition. She and 16 other jurors gathered in Dallas in mid-January to review and evaluate 44 submissions from all over the countr

This was the first year that someone from The Green House Project national organization has participated in judging the competition. According to Donna Paglia, EFA’s consultant for special projects, Wiegand (who was appointed by the Society for the Advancement of Gerontological Environments, or SAGE), was chosen “for her specific talents as a consultant to the industry.

The winners were announced Jan. 23, with eight entrants recognized as competition finalists and another 33 to be published in the showcase issue of EFA magazine. “This distinction is given to projects that received overall scores that were at or above our standards to be published,” said Paglia.

Follow are the criteria for the awards:

• Award of Merit: Overall Project Raises the Bar across all criteria: Innovation; Collaboration; Aesthetics; Operations.

• Honorable Mentions: Raised the Bar within one of more criteria: Innovation; Collaboration; Aesthetics; Operations.

• Finalists: Showed significant scoring within criteria: Innovation; Collaboration; Aesthetics; Operations.

You can find all of the award winners HERE.

The judging happens as follows: Jurors are placed into groups to offer a good balance of architects, designers, consultants, and providers on the panel. Teams then review projects virtually over a two-week period before arriving at the “live” event, where t

EFA judges considered and judged 44 submissions.

hey review the projects in teams and as a full group, according to Paglia.

“There were many variations among the designs submitted and it was very clear to me that some had collaborated more extensively with stakeholders than others,” Wiegand said of her experience. “In my opinion, this is a very important aspect to good design.”

The winners will be recognized during the 2019 EFA Conference and Expo, which takes place April 7 to 10 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Age In America Begins Their Series on John Knox Village

For our next series, we visited Pompano Beach, Fla., where a retirement community known as John Knox Village is located–about 10 miles north of Fort Lauderdale. On the campus are 12 Green House homes, which are small, resident-centered homes designed intentionally to counter the institutional feel of traditional nursing homes. A key feature of a Green House home is that staff and residents are empowered to live and work together as a team. Helping to make this team operate smoothly are Sages, who hold an esteemed position within the home. For this series, we interviewed Sages, all of whom have a lifetime of experience from which to draw upon to assist elders and others within the home. We will let our first interviewee, Diane, explain the purpose of a Sage: “As part of structure of this place they look for volunteers to act as Sages, because we’re old and wise and we’ve had experience working with groups, mentoring people, and problem solving with people. There is a screening process and we were trained. There are homes in this building, and there is at least one Sage assigned to each home. We come in on a volunteer basis and our function is to council, mentor, encourage the shabazim, who are the trained CNAs, within the home, to help them create a self-managed work team. And we are also there to provide contact between the elders and the shabazim and to enable them to get to know each other better. We come in on a fairly regular basis to visit in the home, we attend team meetings, if we’re invited, and hopefully give them the support they need.” . . How often do you come to the home? “It varies. I try to come two or three times a week, and that’s hard because I’m involved in other things. But I try to make it two or three times a week. I’m a resident of John Knox Village, as all the Sages are. We are lucky that we have that volunteer base to work with because everyone is on the property.” . . . . . #changingaging #agewoke #disruptaging #agepositive #greenhousehomes #sages #wisewords @johnknoxvillage #florida #pompanobeach #johnknoxvillage #ageinamerica #oldandwise #olderandwiser

A post shared by Age In America (@ageinamerica) on