Green House Blog

Social Responsibility Knows No Age

Reposted from Association of Jewish Aging Services Newsletter

Don Shulman is the President/CEO of AJAS, a vital, relevant and forward-thinking organization.  Don has been working with elders his entire career.  Don is a Registered Dietitian and completed his internship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota in 1979. Prior to leading AJAS, Don spent 23 years in senior dining with Marriott and then Sodexo. 

 

 

AJAS Communities Speak Out in March for Our Lives Events

 

Like our nation’s youth, AJAS communities around the country last week publicly expressed their views regarding violence and guns.

At 2:00 PM EDT on March 23, many communities held a moment of silence and recited Kaddish (the Jewish prayer of mourning) in memory of those who lost their lives to gun violence.

Elder demonstrations against gun violence was inspired by Green House Partner, Carol Elliott, CEO at Jewish Home Family, according to Don Shulman, AJAS President and CEO. “Ageism yields thoughts that our elders have little or no voice as they grow old. This is just not true,” Shulman said.

Their voices are powerful and as the age demographics continue to change, the voice of our elders becomes even more plentiful and powerful.

Living the Good Life…How the Green House Model Supports People Living with Dementia

“Some people discover their personal mission early in life. For me, decades of life experiences and events would eventually become masterfully woven together to reveal a tapestry of passion and purpose to make life not just worth living for elders, but to actually enable them to live the good life.”  

Susan-Frazier_8924The above quote is from The Green House Project Senior Director, Susan Ryan.  It’s how she chose to open her Ted Talk style presentation at the spring conference for the Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS).  Susan was one of many thought leaders sharing her personal experiences and passion for Elders and how every person should be “Living the Good Life”.  As you will see in the video below, Susan takes you on a journey that will introduce you to some special elders that touched her life and made her realize that life can be different!


 (The talk with Susan begins 39 minutes into the video)

We hope to provide a blog series in the near future entitled “Living the Good Life” based on the lives of other elders living in GH homes.

Green House Leadership Featured at Association of Jewish Aging Services Conference

“Do not cast me away when I am old; do not forsake me when my strength is gone.” –Psalm 71:9

The Green House Project and Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) share many common values, and are proud partners in elder care innovation.  Recently, Green House leadership participated in the AJAS annual meeting to share insights and connect with organizations who share a similar mission to serve elders.

ajas2016_658Senior Director, Susan Ryan, was highlighted as a speaker for “AJAS Speaks”, a TED Talk style session, where thought leaders share their experiences and perspectives.  In her talk, “Living the Good Life”, Susan shares the path that has shaped her personal mission to see the people living with dementia as creative, resourceful and whole.

Innovation Roundtables are a feature of the conference where leaders of the field share insights in short, rotating sessions.  Green House Director of Outreach, Scott Brown, delivered a talk on the power of differentiation in our changing and dynamic health care landscape.

We appreciate the opportunity to partner with innovative organizations as we work to change the paradigm of aging, creating caring homes and meaningful lives.

Please watch for a blog series in the near future entitled “Living the Good Life” based on the stories shared by Susan at the AJAS conference.

The Green House Project Attends Event at The White House

jewish home_white house
Representatives of The New Jewish Home including CEO, Audrey Weiner (right)

Policy makers have the potential to make a huge difference in the lives of elders and long term care providers.  Recently, The Green House Project participated in the Briefing on Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) Innovation and Technology.  Some innovations were technical in nature and some were a result of old fashioned intuition and common sense. The Administration and government representatives were duly impressed with what they heard through these AJAS presentations.

Green House adopter, The New Jewish Home, in Manhattan, NY, discussed their career growth program that develops young people for success in working with elders.  This opportunity to be in the hallowed walls of the White House, where so many important decisions are made, reminded us of the gravity of our work, and the impetus to create better places where we can age and work.