Green House Blog

Chief Experience Officer, New Position Created to Support Person-Directed Care

The Green House model is a radical transformation of traditional long term care.  As a national initiative, Green House adopters are continuously innovating, taking this already proven model to new heights.  The New Jewish Home (formerly, Jewish Home Lifecare), has named veteran eldercare executive Tammy L. Marshall its first Chief Experience Officer, to support a deep and sustained culture change. Ms. Marshall was previously the organization’s Director of Green House Education.

tammy_marshall_headshot2016_preferredIn this newly created position, Ms. Marshall is responsible for leading efforts to create the best possible experience for everyone whom the organization touches.  Ms. Marshall’s chief responsibility will be to ensure that the central tenet of The Green House model—that power resides with the elder and those working closest to them– permeates all facets of the organization.  Building relationships and new kinds of connections between staff members and residents, will be a critical part of Ms. Marshall’s job.

Said Audrey Weiner, President and CEO, The New Jewish Home: “There is no one better qualified to become our first chief experience officer than Tammy Marshall. She brings to the job not only the technical skills and the experience required, but also an unparalleled commitment to the humanity that underlies The Green House model and person-directed care. She is an unrepentant evangelist for the right of elders and those who care for them to live fully realized lives in which their wishes and their contributions are uniquely valued.”

To be called The Living Center of Manhattan, the 20-story structure will be New York City’s first Green House residence and the first to be built in a major urban environment. In keeping with The New Jewish Home’s focus on putting a persons’ wishes first, several of The Living Center’s 22 individual Green House households will be kosher and, in another first for New York City, at least one will be all-LGBTQ, although LGTBQ residents will be welcome in every household.

It has been said that culture change is a journey without a destination, and The New Jewish Home is helping to shape the changing landscape of aging in society.  For more information, visit www.jewishhome.org.

 

Eight over Eighty, Celebrates Elders and Raises Funds for Green House homes in Manhattan

Green House adopter, Jewish Home Lifecare, raises funds for person-directed care as it celebrates 8 remarkable elders who are over the age of 80

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The annual benefit gala hosted by New York City’s Jewish Home Lifecare, a 167-year-old elder care provider, is most definitely not the same old, same old. It is, in fact, an event unlike any other.

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Pat Jacobson, a long time board member for JHL is one of the honorees

Called “Eight Over Eighty” and slated to take place on Wednesday, March 11, at the Mandarin Oriental New York, the event will pay tribute to eight New Yorkers who, in their 80s and 90s, continue to live lives of remarkable achievement, vitality and civic engagement.

The second annual “Eight Over Eighty” will honor author and photographer ARLENE ALDA, cabaret artist BARBARA CARROLL, actor JOEL GREY, graphic designer MILTON GLASER (of, among many other things, fame), volunteer extraordinaire PATRICIA (PAT) JACOBS, and business people and philanthropists CHARLES M. DIKER, IRWIN HOCHBERG, and RITA & FRED RICHMAN.
(The first event, in 2014, honored an equally impressive line-up of octogenarians and nonagenarians: actor DOMINIC “UNCLE JUNIOR SOPRANO” CHIANESE; gay rights trailblazer EDIE WINDSOR; power couple and developer of 1 World Trade Center KLARA & LARRY SILVERSTEIN,; DICK EISNER, founder of one of the country’s largest and most successful accounting firms; EMILY & EUGENE GRANT, philanthropist and real estate developer; and JOAN WACHTLER, a tireless champion of the aging.)

“This event reflects the changing times we live in – times that will see 30 percent of the U.S. population reach 80 or older by 2030,” says CEO Audrey Weiner. “It also goes right to the heart of what Jewish Home Lifecare is all about: celebrating the vitality of older adults, honoring their lives, and respecting their individuality.”

Jewish Home Lifecare is one of the nation’s largest and most diversified nonprofit geriatric care institutions. Each year it provides 12,000 elders with healthcare services and long-term living options suited to their individual needs. Those options include short-term rehabilitation, long-term skilled nursing care, semi- and fully-independent-living residences, and day programs on three campuses, in The Bronx, Manhattan and Westchester. Through its telemedicine program and its extensive home healthcare network, Jewish Home also enables thousands of New Yorkers to age in place.

The money raised by “Eight Over Eighty” will go to support Jewish Home’s person-directed approach to eldercare, an approach epitomized by the long-term care residence being developed for the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Called The Living Center of Manhattan and slated to break ground later this year, the 414-bed structure will be the first GREEN HOUSE® home manhattanin New York City and the first to be built in a major metropolitan, high-rise environment.

The Living Center will have 22 of the Green House model’s trademark small, nurturing households, each with 12 private bedrooms and baths clustered around a large, homey shared living and dining space. Dedicated staff will prepare meals and arrange activities, outings and special events according to residents’ wishes, and provide whatever assistance they need with dressing, dining and other daily tasks. Medical personnel will be centralized elsewhere in the building, providing ongoing monitoring and care as appropriate.

The result will be a long-term care environment that offers residents the privacy, dignity and autonomy every human being deserves as well as the comfort and support of a small, close-knit community. The residents, by living in a place reminiscent of the New York City homes in which they spent much, if not all, of their adulthood, will be able to stay connected to the lives they have lived and the familiar surroundings in which they have lived them.

manhattan_2Jewish Home Lifecare has already implemented the Green House philosophy to eldercare at its Westchester branch, known as the Sarah Neuman Center. There, 26 elders are comfortably and happily settled in two of what will be seven Green House model inspired homes known as Small Houses.  “The Green House model is the future not only of Jewish Home Lifecare, but of long-term care for all older adults,” says Weiner. “There is no other model that actively recognizes the personhood of the men and women we are privileged to care for and that enables them to take the lead in their own lives.”

Click on these links to learn more about Jewish Home Lifecare’s Living Center in Manhattan and Small Houses in Westchester, or contact Tammy Marshall, Director, Green House Project, at Jewish Home at TMarshall@jewishhome.org.

Leading Age 2013, a Gathering of Innovators

Recently, Green House Project team members had the stimuating opportunity to attend Leading Age’s 2013 Annual Meeting.  At this gathering of innovative organizations, leaders and vendors from around the country, The Green House model was highlighted on numerous occasions as setting the standard for the future of long term care.

Audrey Weiner, Green House adopter and exiting board chair for Leading Age, opened the conference in full style with bright red boots and a message of hope for the innovative leaders in the room.  The health care landscape is changing, and Ms. Weiner challenged the group to be the providers and organizations that will lead the charge to meet the needs of the field through innovation, strong data and compassion.  She quoted Dr. Bill Thomas, “There is a new old age waiting to be born and the culture change movement will be called upon to attend its birth.”

Throughout the conference, all of the hot topics were explored, from meeting the needs of people living with dementia, to health care reform and improving metrics such as decreasing rehospitalization.  Barry Berman, a wise leader of The Green House movement, and CEO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, received the Award of Honor, the highest award that Leading Age bestows upon its members.  Barry has made a difference to so many people through his years of service.  The elders, the staff and the people living with ALS and MS for whom he has created a world where life is worth living, created this video to share their gratitude.

The environment where elders live is very important to their well-being, especially for people who are living with dementia.  Person-Centered Design has come a long way over the last 10 years, from the medicalized institutions of yesterday, to small house models and beyond.  Dr. Bill Thomas was awarded the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Ten Year Award for the innovations and contributions that he has made to the field. In true visionary fashion, upon accepting the award, Dr. Thomas thanked everyone for the work that has been done, but challenged the crowd to think about, What’s next?

White Oaks Cottages at Fox Hill Village also won an AIA award for cutting edge design to serve people living with dementia.

 

It was a wonderful week in Dallas.  The energy was palpable with a feeling that the providers in those hallways are the ones that will change the world, and that there must be a strong shift to person-centered living in order to meet the needs of the changing demographic of elders.  The Green House model is a strong and proven force for innovation and quality.

Click here to view photos from the reception that we hosted with other culture change leaders.  It is through the providers and leaders of this movement that we will be one of the solutions that will take us into the future.