Green House Blog

Portrait of a Green House Leader, Terry Rogers

Terry Rogers, President & CEO of Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, in Birmingham, AL was recently highlighted in The Green House Project‘s Leadership webinar series. His organization includes, St. Martin’s in the Pines, a continuing care retirement community and home care service in Birmingham, with nine Green House cottages.

terry and elderTerry’s inspiration for a career in health came from observing his mother as caregiver to family members and neighbors, graduate from nursing school, and enter the home health profession. After graduating from The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Terry began his healthcare administration career in business and operations positions with home health agencies, hospitals, and the Episcopal Foundation of Jefferson County, where he has served as President & CEO since 2000. In addition, he serves as a member of the Community Advisory Committee for the University of Alabama Comprehensive Center on Healthy Aging, the National Public Policy Congress, the Budget and Finance Committee, and the Business Strategy Council for LeadingAge, in addition to his service as member of the Green House Project Peer Network Steering Committee.

Terry began his career with St. Martin’s with a formal long range planning effort aimed at redeveloping the campus and replacing the skilled nursing building. His colleague, Linda Robertson, an Eden Alternative Associate, directed him towards the work of The Green House Project in Tupelo, Mississippi. After attending a workshop in Tupelo, he returned to Birmingham to inform the board about this innovative model of care and identify what a new nursing home may look like on their campus. Terry describes that seeing truly is believing; the enthusiasm for the model carried throughout the board and to the broader community and together they were committed to developing the first Green House homes in Alabama. He attributes this success to formally engaging with The Green House Project team to aid in the collaborative design process of their multi-story Green House homes and assist in overcoming regulatory hurdles by training state regulators about the Green House model.

st. martins_ shovelsDuring the development process, Terry notes that “we had a steep hill to climb” but felt confident given the robust training opportunities provided by The Green House Project team and the value of being associated with the model given the research supporting its success. He continues to be an advocate for the model integrity process and the importance of the Green House trademark as a method of accountability throughout the Peer Network to ensure the original guiding principles are instilled in every community. “We didn’t get into The Green House model because it was easy, we got into this because it was the right thing. Changing in the right way is why we’re having the outcomes we’re having. If we start letting “the right way” be diluted, the outcomes are going to change… we think The Green House model works and we want to do it in the right way and we want everyone in the Peer Network to do it the right way as well.”

At St. Martin’s, continuing team education is key in maintaining the integrity of the model and helps leadership “keep it fresh.” Terry describes that continuing assessment and evaluation creates an opportunity for leaders to revisit the beginnings of why they started and to continually engage in action plans for improvements. As the “keepers of the philosophy”, leaders must problem solve, motivate, and coach their teams through consistent messaging of the model. Since opening, St. Martin’s aims to serve as a role model and brand ambassador to encourage and invigorate The Green House model into future organizations and help them throughout their journey.

Upon opening, Terry observed the model’s financial success as a result of the shift in operational cost structure and the flattened hierarchy that creates a “middle management shake-up.” Furthermore, adding Green House cottages into the St. Martin’s continuum of care created a competitive advantage that drives demand at all levels of care, resulting in a corresponding increase in their assisted living and independent living occupancy of approximately 5%. This influx of revenue allows St. Martin’s to promote the community giveback component of their mission to ensure that Elders have the opportunity to live in their cottages regardless of their payor status.

In terms of quality of care, Terry describes that “there’s a little bit of magic taking place” in their Green House cottages that yields better outcomes. Specifically, their 100% occupancy rate, higher family satisfaction survey scores, and positive clinical outcomes are a result of better, deeper knowing in their Green House homes. The Green House principles “just makes sense.” Despite the Green House model’s success at St. Martin’s, Terry notes that they can always do better and are constantly seeking improvements. He is pleased to be a part of the Peer Network and associated with other courageous change agents that are never satisfied in knowing all they need to know in caring for elders.

A lifelong resident of Birmingham, Terry loves fishing, Crimson Tide football (Roll Tide!), participating in barbecue competitions, and spending as much time as possible by the lake with his family. He is presenting at the 2015 Annual Meeting with Green House Project team members Susan Frazier and Marla DeVries on the Model Enrichment Resource and Integrity Tool (MERIT) and the research that supports this process for sustainability.  To hear the full interview>>

GROUNDBREAKING OF CLARK-LINDSEY’S GREEN HOUSE HOMES FOR DEMENTIA CARE

Green House Homes Will Be First of Their Kind in Champaign County

(Reprinted from Perkins Eastman) Last Thursday, September 24, in Urbana, IL, team members from the Chicago office of international design and architecture firm Perkins Eastman joined leadership from Clark-Lindsey for the groundbreaking of the CCRC’s new small homes for specialized dementia care—one devoted to assisted living and the other for skilled nursing care—that will follow The GREEN HOUSE® model. Each home will feature 12 private bedrooms, individualized care from specially trained caregivers, and home furnishings. The Perkins Eastman design team is led by Principal Jerry Walleck AIA and Associate Principal Ramu Ramachandran AIA, LEED AP, two key members of the firm’s renowned senior living practice area.

clark lindseyClark-Lindsey has partnered with The Green House Project and Perkins Eastman to help usher in a new and superior standard of care for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses. The introduction of these homes not only marks the first Green House project in Champaign County but also a major step forward for how Illinois providers and regulatory officials are looking to institute efficient and innovative care models for seniors. Green House homes are designed to provide a personalized model of care within a real home setting, replete with an open kitchen, dining room and other common areas, setting them apart from the traditional institutional model that can resemble a hospital or nursing home.

clark lindsey2The new homes, situated on a 10,000 sf footprint, will feature an architectural design where every inch of space has been carefully considered in order to transform the physical environment to feel more like home. From the outdoor courtyard, library and den areas to the open kitchen providing home cooked meals, these amenities encourage social contact among elders and caregivers. The homes’ design is tailored to maintain existing on-site trees as well as acknowledge the natural surroundings with respect to building proportion, scale and form, while also taking full advantage of the expansive views of adjacent Meadowbrook Park.

“Clark-Lindsey is already known within the industry as a leader and innovator when it comes to care,” says Jerry Walleck, the project’s design lead, “and the new Green House homes are a continuation of that. They will provide invaluable care and services to dementia residents and their families, and it’s an enormous privilege to have played our part in making that happen.” Both homes are scheduled to open in late 2016.

Clark-Lindsey Village was founded in 1978 and is the area’s first and only CCRC. It is one of only eight certified Centers for Successful Aging in the U.S. In addition to its forthcoming dementia care small homes, Clark-Lindsey Village offers extensive independent living accommodations, as well as inpatient and outpatient therapy services, assisted living and skilled nursing care at its Meadowbrook Health Center.

The Green House Project is a radically new national model for skilled nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self- contained homes organized to deliver individualized care and meaningful relationships between residents and care staff.

About Perkins Eastman
Perkins Eastman is among the top design and architecture firms in the world. With almost 950 employees in 14 locations around the globe, Perkins Eastman practices at every scale of the built environment. From niche buildings to complex projects that enrich whole communities, the firm’s portfolio reflects a dedication to progressive and inventive design that enhances the quality of the human experience. With work in 46 states and more than 40 countries, the firm’s portfolio includes transportation and public infrastructure, high-end residential, commercial, hotels, retail, office buildings, corporate interiors, schools, hospitals, museums, senior living, and public sector facilities. Perkins Eastman provides award-winning design through its offices in North America (New York, NY; Boston, MA; Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Los Angeles, CA; Pittsburgh, PA; San Francisco, CA; Stamford, CT; Toronto, Canada; and Washington, DC); South America (Guayaquil, Ecuador); North Africa and Middle East (Dubai, UAE); and Asia (Mumbai, India, and Shanghai, China).

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Jefferson County Creates Sustainable Change Across Their Organization

In order to change the way that the world sees aging, it is important to not just implement The Green House model, but also to sustain it.  Through experience and research, we have found that this occurs most successfully when culture change exists throughout the organization, not just within The Green House homes.

JCNH Green House
Jefferson County Green House home

Jefferson County Nursing home in Tennessee opened their three Green House homes in 2010, and have experienced successful outcomes and stories of transformation.  As they look to the future, they have decided to partner again with The Green House Project on a process called, The Legacy Blueprint.  This program is offered to Green House organizations when they also have a legacy home to promote alignment of the core values and essential practices of The Green House model.  All elders, regardless of where they live, deserve a small, flexible and warm environment with opportunities for choice, and a sense of purpose.

Roger Mynatt, Executive Director of Jefferson County Nursing Home, shares, “We chose work with The Green House Project on the Legacy Blueprint because it will create the perfect bridge between the Legacy Building and our Green House homes.  We are taking the best of our mission and complimenting it with the Green House Core Values to create staff empowerment and person-directed care.”

Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010
Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010

To learn more about The Green House implementation process, click here to download Homes for Success

 

 

 

 

The Heart of The Home: Elders and Staff

Last year, when Claremont, CA resident Bill Andrus began to need 24-hour care in their home, he and his wife, Georgeann, chose Mt. San Antonio Gardens’ Evergreen Villas for his new home. The Villas are trademarked  GREEN HOUSE homes, which provides a real home for people needing skilled nursing care. In each of the two villas, the residents are supported by a small, self-managed team of care partners, known as shahbazim, and nurses. Mt. San Antonio Gardens pioneered what are California’s first and only small homes licensed for skilled nursing.

“We wanted Bill to live in a stimulating environment while receiving the care he needs,” says Georgeann. Acknowledging the difficulty of making that decision, the couple feels fortunate that the Villas were an option for them. Georgeann, who served on the Gardens board of directors for six years when The Green House homes were being considered, says, “We are so grateful for Bill to be part of it. It has been particularly heartwarming to see this from the initial concept and then to participate in the reality of seeing it work very well.”

Bill and Georgeann Anrus
Bill and Georgeann Anrus

While Bill was settling in, Georgeann applied to live at the Gardens as an active, healthy independent resident. She moved into an apartment on campus where she takes a quick walk to the Evergreen Villas. Living on the same campus means easy and frequent visits each day. The couple goes together to lectures and performances held at the Gardens or at the nearby Claremont Colleges. “Our neurologist had said to me, ‘Now you can just be a spouse, not the caregiver’, and he was so right!”

“Bill has become physically stronger since his move here,” marvels Georgeann. The special design of the great room has inspired Bill to use his walker, unassisted. The couple also credits the home-like atmosphere and the personalized attention of the shahbazim and nurses to his continued well-being. Because this team works so closely with such a small group of elders, the care partners get to know their personalities and individual needs and preferences intimately. While the shahbazim are also responsible for cooking and maintaining the house, their first priority, Georgeann notes, is always the care of the elders.

“The people are the best thing,” says Bill, who especially enjoys sharing common interests with Registered Nurse (RN) Michael Sansosti. Both are avid readers and love fishing.

Michael and Bill Reading for screen only 100 dpi
Bill and Michael reading

“It’s great,” says Michael. “We trade books and when I have some extra time in my schedule, we’ll spend time talking about them.” The ability to give everyone a little extra attention is very gratifying. Michael, who previously worked in structured hospital environments, enjoys the opportunity he now has to cultivate more personal friendships with the residents he cares for. “Certain people, like Bill, do very well in this kind of setting. It is especially well suited to those who prefer to take the initiative for their daily activities” and who enjoy the interaction and activity that is such an important part of the daily experience in the Evergreen Villas, according to Michael.

Working with the caregivers is also a new experience for Michael. “We work side by side with the shahbazim. While the RNs are in charge of everything clinical, the care partners spend all of their time interacting with the residents, so they can give us feedback on their behavior and needs, enabling us to intervene early.”

 

Amanda, shahbaz, and Michael, nurse, work together
Amanda, shahbaz, and Michael, nurse, work together

“Communication is a big thing here,” acknowledges shahbaz Amanda Phos, who began her training for her role long before the Evergreen Villas opened. With just 10 elders in each of the two Evergreen Villas, the care partners get to know each person personally, from their life stories to their health needs and abilities, their food preferences, and their hobbies and interests. “If you know the elders well, taking care of them is very easy,” says Amanda. “I think that’s the beauty of this place. We base each day’s activities on what they individually want to do. And every day is different. When we all come together around the dinner table, we like to talk about the day’s activities. It feels like a family.

 

“It’s hard work, and it takes a team to make it work so well,” says Amanda. “We’re the heart of the home, and that makes it very gratifying to be here.”

 

Short Term Rehab in The Green House Model – A Case Study

Leonard Florence Center for Living

6x7X3CrHokb6SwAIWDKUKSWCpdd6M78Ay_XOPVuW9LcThe Green House model  was originally designed as a long term care solution where  elders could live for the remainder of their lives. Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) has expanded their Green House homes to include three short term rehab homes within their ten home building in Chelsea, MA. In the webinar, Short Term Rehab in the Green House Model – A Case Study, Ina Hoffman, Director of Admissions, and Jill Tura, Director of Rehabilitation, describe how short term rehab can be delivered in a real home environment, and highlight their positive clinical and financial outcomes. Their decision to incorporate short term rehab into their Green House homes outlines how providing this service has made them   a preferred provider in the community and creates a highly attractive environment that increases consumer demand.

In order to provide high quality care to elders and those who living with diseases such as  Multiple Sclerosis or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, LFCL needed to create a financial situation that  would enable them to serve Medicaid recipients, while managing organizational needs.   Incorporating short term rehab into their Green House homes provides financial balance to their building and allows individuals to receive short term CF00eJRB_q1f5bqRESlaGAnrAXs_IbIOBlU-ZcNFcTYorthopedic, cardiopulmonary, neurological, or medical rehabilitation in a real home environment. Currently, LFCL has up to 30 individuals receiving short term rehab at any given time, averaging 45 admissions per month. Through strategic marketing, seeking connections with Boston area hospitals and Accountable Care Organizations, and referrals from elders and their families, they became a choice provider of short term rehab in their community – and a reputation that proves it.

 

“There are not many places that can do what we do.” Ina says when describing short term rehab in a Green House home as an “Occupational Therapist’s dream.” Rather than stimulating home-like environments, functional, practical therapy is provided seven days a week in a real home to ensure maximum safety and success upon discharge. Those who come to LFCL for rehab  practice activities of daily living with their core rehabilitation team in the common areas of the home, while more personal tasks such as bathing, dressing, and toileting can be done in the privacy of their own bedroom and bathroom. The Green House environment fosters a sense of community and family within the home.  The members of the house encourage each other during therapy sessions, discuss therapy goals and frustrations over meals, and exchange telephone numbers when they return to the community to keep in touch beyond their stay. Because LFCL is within the larger Chelsea Jewish Foundation, when a person is ready to transition to in-home care, they can continue to receive therapy from the same core team, allowing for a continuous, efficient transition of care.

 

By incorporatingD_YEvbOIK7ASoF2DEyGTUyKUR795WiRz3exvUwkEzps short-term rehab into their Green House homes, LFCL created a financial strategy that “keeps the building going.” Short-term rehab created an opportunity to stay true to their mission while providing high-quality, integrated care with positive outcomes, including decreased length of stay, higher overall satisfaction, and decreased rehospitalizations.

 

Interested in learning more about short-term rehab in Green House homes? <<Listen to the webinar recording here>> 

CEDAR SINAI PARK TO BREAK GROUND ON $33 MILLION CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

cedar sinia

Ceder Sinai Park (CSP) is happy to announce it will be breaking ground on a $33 million construction project focused on renovation of the Robison Jewish Health Center and its transformation into a 44-bed post-acute rehabilitation center. The project will also include the construction of two additional buildings with four homes in THE GREEN HOUSE® model – providing 12 beds each (48 total) for an improved model of long-term care.

“We commend Cedar Sinai Park for their vision to further their mission by implementing The Green House model, and their commitment to transform long term care in Oregon” said Susan Frazier, Senior Director, The Green House Project.

CSP is committed to helping people stay at home as long as possible or maintain lower levels of care and is moving forward with this project in response to community needs for post-hospital sub-acute care rehabilitation services to facilitate returning home after a medical event such as a hip replacement or surgery.

Four new homes will be part of the Harold Schnitzer Health & Rehabilitation Care Center, focused on providing state-of-the-art long-term care in the model of Green House homes across the country. These homes will emphasize quality-of-life; person-directed care which results in improved healthcare outcomes for residents who can no longer remain at home due to conditions such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis.

On Wednesday, July 15th, we will officially break ground on the new center. The groundbreaking will take place at 4:00 p.m. on the corner of SW 62nd Avenue and Boundary Street, and will include remarks from CSP and community leaders.

“We are pleased to see this dynamic construction project begin. It is important to Cedar Sinai Park and the entire community that we develop a 21st century service capacity that is both beautiful and able to meet changing healthcare demands,” said Jim Winkler, Capital Campaign Chair.

“Cedar Sinai Park is proud to be working with LRS Architects and R&H Construction on this project” according to David Fuks, CSP Chief Executive Officer. “These two firms represent the highest quality teams and we are glad to be teaming with them on this very important work.”

The Green House Project is a radically new, national model for skilled-nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self-contained homes organized to deliver individualized care, meaningful relationships and better direct care jobs through a self-managed team of direct care staff working in cross-trained roles. Green House homes meet all state and federal regulatory and reimbursement criteria for skilled-nursing facilities.

About Cedar Sinai Park: Cedar Sinai Park provides residential and community-based care to elders and adults with special needs, allowing them to live with comfort, independence, and dignity in a manner and in an environment based on Jewish values. A nonprofit organization, we are committed to delivering a broad-based continuum of care that can be tailored to individuals’ unique needs. Our services include independent and assisted living (Rose Schnitzer Manor), nursing home care (Robison Jewish Health Center), daily respite care (Adult Day Services), affordable housing for seniors and people with disabilities (Rose Schnitzer Tower, Lexington Apartments, Park Tower Apartments, The 1200 Building), in-home care (Sinai In-Home Care), a collaboration with Jewish Family & Child Service), and affordable housing for developmentally disabled adults (Kehillah).

Christian Care Communities Opens Doors to The Homeplace at Midway – Kentucky’s First Green House® Senior Living Residence

Midway

 

 

Contact: Mary Lynn Spalding                                                                                   

Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

Christian Care Communities

(502) 254-4242 or cell (502) 609-4690

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Christian Care Communities Opens Doors to The Homeplace at Midway – Kentucky’s First Green House® Senior Living Residence

New $13.5 Million Green House® Community Creates Small Cottages of Care Revolutionizes Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing for Older Adults

(MIDWAY, KENTUCKY (JUNE 25, 2015) – Christian Care Communities today opened the doors to Kentucky’s first Green House® Residence – The Homeplace at Midway – that revolutionizes assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing care for older adults. Public officials, community and business leaders joined with Christian Care for the ribbon cutting celebration, signaling the opening of the new $13.5 million Green House® community at 101 Sexton Way, across from Midway College.

“The Homeplace at Midway represents a new beginning for older adults in Kentucky and for communities across the Commonwealth to embrace them as living treasures, not a burden or a challenge,” said Dr. Keith Knapp, president and chief executive officer of Christian Care Communities. “We are extremely grateful to the City of Midway, Midway Nursing Home Task Force, Midway College, state and local government agencies, our capital campaign’s Leadership Council and all our friends and supporters who championed this new direction and envisioned with us a new day when older adults would receive the highest quality care and support, without feeling their lives are being disrupted or overtaken. We trust that it will inspire other senior living providers to move in a similar direction.”

“States, families and communities are being challenged to find better ways of providing for the needs of elders, and The Homeplace, with its emphasis on home, shows how care can be made more loving, community centered and effective,” said William Thomas, M.D., founder of The Green House® model, who was among the many special guests participating in the ribbon cutting celebration.

Person-Centered Cottages of Care
The new 31-acre Christian Care Green House® community offers a comprehensive continuum of care with a 12-person assisted living cottage for those who need periodic assistance with daily living activities; a 12-person memory care/personal care cottage for individuals with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive impairments; and two skilled nursing cottages for 23 individuals with short-term rehabilitation or long-term care needs. In addition, The Homeplace at Midway includes an administrative cottage and the Lucy Simms Lloyd Gathering House for special gatherings, worship services and activities.

“In our Green House® cottages, each resident will have a private bedroom and bath and share, just as people do in any home, the kitchen, living room, den and porch areas,” said Dr. Knapp. “It’s all designed to give residents the freedom to set their own daily routines and to live life to its fullest, while receiving the individual care they need – within each cottage.”

As the community grows, Christian Care Communities plans to add independent living garden homes and an Adult Day Center program to complement the resident cottages.

The Green House® Difference
“The Green House® approach strengthens our ability to honor older adults by creatively fostering their inclusion – their meaningful participation – in the very communities they helped shape,” said Dr. Knapp, who noted that empirical evidence is mounting to support the effectiveness of the Green House® model on several fronts. “Clinical outcomes improve dramatically, resident and family satisfaction rise exponentially and staff turnover drops by leaps and bounds.”

About Christian Care Communities
Headquartered in Louisville, Christian Care Communities is Kentucky’s largest faith-inspired, non-profit provider of senior living communities and long-term care for older adults. In addition to Midway, its communities, services and programs for older adults are located in Bowling Green, Corbin, Grayson, Hartford, Hopkinsville, Lexington, Louisville, Nicholasville, Owensboro and Taylorsville.
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“Homes on The Range”, Inspiring Documentary of Green House homes in Sheridan, WY

Homes on the Range, a documentary from producer and director, Dale Bell, captures the amazing 10-year journey, of the citizens of Sheridan, Wyoming, who built the first grassroots Green House homes in the country.  This film chronicles their struggles, successes and ultimately the triumphant opening of their Green House homes, which change the way elders live in their community.

There are many ways to view this documentary. The film will be shown on PBS stations around the country, and DVDs are available for purchase.  Broadcasts will begin in May, which is Older American’s month.  All information about Homes on The Range can be found at: http://mediapolicycenter.org/

 

To see a full list of current airdates and times>>

Homes on the Range “The New Pioneers” TEASE from Media Policy Center on Vimeo.

The White House and The Green House Tour the Leonard Florence Center for Living

This week, representatives from the White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) and THE GREEN HOUSE ® Project visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) in Chelsea, MA. The Center is the first urban Green House skilled nursing community in the country. Nora Super, Executive Director (WHCOA) and Rachel Maisler, Deputy Communications Director (WHCOA) traveled from Washington to see, first hand, how The Green House model supports a successful aging and good jobs.  Senior Director of The Green House Project, Susan Frazier and Director of Outreach, Scott Brown, were in attendance; Betsy Mullen, COO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates LFCL, directed the visit.WHCOA Tour picture May 2015

The visit began by spending time with a group of elders who were celebrating National Senior Health & Fitness Day.  Amidst songs and dancing, it was clear that these people are living life to the fullest.  Winnie Murphy, who is 105, told the group she loved living at the LFCL because there “was always something to do and people to visit.” In fact, Winnie is engaged in meaningful activities every day; she goes to the salon to get her hair done about once a week, relaxes with a drink at the monthly Pub Hour, plays bingo as often as possible and attends a daily exercise class.

A key focus of the visit was to highlight the increased quality of life that elders and staff experience in The Green House model.  Because of the high rise setting, the ground floor of the building has become a “main street” of sorts.  The group spent time in the café, deli, spa and outdoor patios as well as the residences where elders receive long-term care and short term rehabilitation.  It was gratifying to see Ms. Super’s reaction to each elder having a private bedroom and bathroom, and the sense of comfort and belonging that one feels in the open floor plan with accessible kitchens and dining areas in every home.  Clearly, this revolutionary model of living made a tremendous impact upon the visitors, which will hopefully lead to tremendous impacts in policy to support the spread of this model across the country.

An added plus: the WHCOA team sent a camera crew to video-tape the tour. We are hopeful that this footage will be featured at the White House Conference on Aging, to be held in Washington, DC on July 13.

Highlighting Shahbaz, Darlene Scott at Porter Hills Green House homes

Empathy, compassion, honor and respect are just a few of the qualities required in those working with elders in THE GREEN HOUSE® homes. These qualities are extremely evident in Darlene Scott, a Shahbaz at the Porter Hills Green House homes in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

2Darlene has worked at Porter Hills since 1998 when she was hired as a certified nursing assistant in the Health and Rehab Center. After a short period of time, she was promoted to Unit Clerk and continued to prove she had the personality and skills needed to build strong and trusting relationships with residents. This ability to connect with those she served opened the door to a position as an activity coordinator.

While in this new role, Darlene took advantage of many educational opportunities to develop and hone her skills. This included becoming a Certified Eden Associate1

When Porter Hills decided to build two Green House® homes, Darlene was encouraged to consider working as a Shahbaz. “When I was presented with the opportunity to be a part of Green House® homes I thought, this is it, this is living out everything I have been trained to do. I had retained my CNA license which meant I qualified, so I decided to pursue this role that embodied my passion for elders.”

Darlene has worked as a Shahbaz since September of 2009 and enjoys the person-centered approach and the strong relationships developed. She has seen first-hand the impact that this unique approach to skilled care has on elders in the home.

“We had an elder who moved in with late stage dementia. She was high acuity, didn’t walk or talk, and was total care. Her son brought her here and told us that the doctor had said she had 6 months to a year left to live. The son wanted his mom to have the best care possible and he knew that it would be through the Green House® homes at Porter Hills. His mother had already been receiving care but he wanted her to have the ‘best of the best’. She moved in and initially didn’t talk and needed to be coaxed to eat. One day, I was leading a time of discussion and questions and asked about favorite colors. As we were going around the room hearing each elders’ answer, she raised her head and said, ‘my favorite color is yellow’. After that day she began to feed herself again and communicate. To me that signified living because with a lot of elderly people, eating is the last thing they have control of. Not eating can be their way of saying ‘I’m done’. For her to show that she was going to feed herself and was going to live again was a defining moment for me. I realized in that moment, that the concept of the Green House homes was not just a theory. This works, this is where people want to come to continue living no matter what stage of life they are at.”

3Darlene’s primary role in the home is to protect, sustain, and nurture the elders living there by providing assistance with activities of daily living and meeting other needs as required. “We are given the time and atmosphere to develop relationships with the elders and their families. It’s a wonderful place to work. This is a great community and Porter Hills is a great organization. Having The Green House homes and supporting them as a business, Porter Hills shows that we are here for elders, we are here for the geriatric population, and we are here to provide them with the best services and the best life that they can live.”

The rewards are not only felt by the elders in the community. “When you walk out of the door, despite the ups and downs, you know that you have made a difference. These elders could be living anywhere and not getting the care and relationships that they have here. But, they are HERE and we can give them that. It’s very rewarding.”

CLARK-LINDSEY VILLAGE REDEFINES WELLNESS FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA

Committed to radically changing the delivery of nursing care for people living with dementia

GHlogo_Horizontal-RGB_smallclark lindsey logo

Arlington, Virginia (May 5, 2015) — Clark-Lindsey Village, a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community located in Urbana, Illinois, will be working with The Green House Project, a not-for-profit that is part of Capital Impact’s Community Solutions Group, to develop the first Green House homes in the state not located on federal land. Clark-Lindsey plans to open two certified Green House homes in 2016.

Committed to promoting wellness on their campus, the Clark-Lindsey board made a decision to ensure that their mission extended to all residents, including those living with dementia, “We want to be a place for residents, family members, employees, and the community to grow, socially, intellectually, physically and spiritually. Pursuing The Green House core values of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff will deepen our efforts,” says Kristy Stoker, Green House guide. The new Green House homes will house up to 12 elders and have been designed from the bottom up to look and feel like a real home.

Research shows that a Green House home’s intimate layout, combined with its innovative staffing, provides four times more personal and social contact than typical nursing homes. In an effort to create culture change across the campus, Clark-Lindsey will work with The Green House Project to bring Green House principles into their legacy nursing home as well.

“Clark-Lindsey Village is helping to change the face of long-term care. Our choice to partner with The Green House Project came from the knowledge that they would help support us in our small home journey and, when needed, to help challenge us to re-think our traditional practices within our existing campus. We have appreciated the support they have provided as we work towards aligning our existing culture of excellence with the Green House values,” said Deb Reardanz, CEO, “In addition to the impact that Green House is already having on our campus, it’s also a great privilege to be a leader in the state of Illinois. We are excited to be part of the team that will help clear the regulatory challenges that sometimes make it difficult to move beyond the traditional institutional approach for providing skilled nursing care.”

Clark-Lindsey Village is part of a larger effort nationwide to dramatically improve the way aging Americans receive long-term care. With support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Capital Impact Partners, The Green House Project has developed 173 homes in 27 states to date.

“Regardless of ability, every aging American should have the opportunity to receive high-quality care with dignity,” said Scott Brown, Director of Outreach for The Green House Project. “By choosing The Green House model, Clark-Lindsey Village is affirming their mission to provide elders with the greatest needs new options to help them lead robust and meaningful lives,” continued Brown. “We look forward to partnering with their organization, and expanding access to new and meaningful care options for people living with dementia”

About The Green House Project
Based in Arlington, Virginia, The Green House Project promotes an alternative to the traditional, institutional skilled nursing, replacing it with an innovative new model that balances quality of life with quality of care. In the Green House model, large nursing facilities are replaced with small, self-contained homes that include private bedrooms and baths, home-cooked meals and access to the outdoors, while meeting all skilled nursing regulatory and reimbursement criteria. Incorporating the core values of meaningful life, real home and empowered staff, The Green House model creates a higher quality of life, improved medical outcomes, and greater caregiver satisfaction. There are currently more than 170 Green House homes in 27 states. The Green House Project is an initiative within Capital Impact Partners’ Community Solutions Group, and received initial funding through grants from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To learn more, visit our website at www.thegreenhouseproject.org

About Clark Lindsey Village: Clark-Lindsey, East Central Illinois’ premier retirement community, is situated on 28 acres bordering Urbana’s Meadowbrook Park. Clark-Lindsey is a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community located on the edge of the beautiful University of Illinois campus. For more than 30 years, they have provided residents with exceptional service that has earned them an outstanding reputation throughout the state. As the only Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) in Champaign County. On one campus you can find independent living in The Villas and The Village apartments, and you can find Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing Care and Renewal Therapy Center within Meadowbrook Health Center. There are 16 villas and 132 Village apartments, 17 assisted living rooms, 58 long term skilled care beds, and 25 short-term rehab beds.

About The Green House Project: The Green House Project is a radically new, national model for skilled-nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self-contained homes organized to deliver individualized care, meaningful relationships and better direct care jobs through a self-managed team of direct care staff working in cross-trained roles. Green House homes meet all state and federal regulatory and reimbursement criteria for skilled-nursing facilities. http://thegreenhouseproject.org/
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Contacts:
Rachel Scher McLean, The Green House Project, 703-647-2345, rmclean@capitalimpact.org
Kristy Stoker, Clark Lindsey Village, 217-344-2144 , kstoker@clark-lindsey.com