Green House Blog

2015: A Year of Remarkable Growth

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Banner signed at the 2015 Annual Meeting by Green House adopters

2015 was a year of remarkable growth for The Green House Project. We are coming to a community near you, and our name is recognized as the pinnacle of long term care innovation. The Peer Network is one of those crucial elements that sets us apart and as our network grows, we develop and evolve because of their wisdom. The 8th Annual Green House Meeting was a powerful convening of this network. Green House adopters from around the country come together to learn from leaders in the field and each other.  They gain energy and successful practices toward continued success. To support this sustainability and apply the results of the THRIVE research that will be published in 2016, The Green House Project Thrive-logoreleased a tool to gauge model integrity. This tool will ensure that The Green House core values of Real Home, Meaningful Life and Empowered Staff thrive in all organizations who are living this model every day.

The Green House Project receives a great deal of recognition and media coverage. Here’s just a small sampling of the dozens of stories and accolades over the last few months.

  • Green House Project Founder Hailed as top “Influencer in Aging.” In its first annual list of people that are changing aging and how we think about aging, Next Avenue recognized The Green House Project’s founder Bill Thomas. Read more.
  • The New York Times Highlights Green House Homes. In a recently published story on the trend toward smaller nursing home residences, the author highlights the Green House model. Read more. The_New_York_Times
  •  Recognition at Annual LeadingAge Conference. At this year’s conference in Boston, thousands of attendees got to hear Atul Gawande’s keynote, where he discussed The Green House model and specifically called out the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, MA. Read more. Dr. Eleanor Barbera of McKnight’s visited the Leonard Florence Center while attending the conference and wrote about it. Read more.

The Green House Project is about to end an historic year – there are now 185 Green House homes open in 28 states. Here’s just a sampling of some of the news from Green House projects around the country over the last few months:

  • Washington County (Colorado) Nursing Home Groundbreaking. In a total replacement of its current nursing home, Washington County will be developing 4 Green House homes. This is the second project in Colorado. Read more.
  • Saint Elizabeth Groundbreaking – First in Rhode Island. Rhode Island breaks its moratorium on new nursing home development to approve the first Green House homes in the state. Read More.

    saint e ground breaking
    Groundbreaking at Saint Elizabeth’s Community in Rhode Island
  • Morris Hall Meadows (NJ) Grand Opening. In October, Morris Hall Meadows opened 6 new Green House homes, making it the second Green House project in New Jersey. Read More.
  • Clark-Lindsey (IL) Groundbreaking. In September, Clark-Lindsey broke ground on two Green House homes that will be dedicated to dementia care. This is a major step forward for Illinois providers and regulatory offices looking to spur innovation in the state. Read More.

As we look with hope and gratitude toward the new year, please take a moment to hear Doris Delanus, an elder who lived at The Village of Redford in Michigan, tell us about what these homes mean to her.  Elders Rule! 

Portrait of a Green House Elder: Doris Delanus (2 mins 42 secs) from The Green House Project on Vimeo.

GROUNDBREAKING OF CLARK-LINDSEY’S GREEN HOUSE HOMES FOR DEMENTIA CARE

Green House Homes Will Be First of Their Kind in Champaign County

(Reprinted from Perkins Eastman) Last Thursday, September 24, in Urbana, IL, team members from the Chicago office of international design and architecture firm Perkins Eastman joined leadership from Clark-Lindsey for the groundbreaking of the CCRC’s new small homes for specialized dementia care—one devoted to assisted living and the other for skilled nursing care—that will follow The GREEN HOUSE® model. Each home will feature 12 private bedrooms, individualized care from specially trained caregivers, and home furnishings. The Perkins Eastman design team is led by Principal Jerry Walleck AIA and Associate Principal Ramu Ramachandran AIA, LEED AP, two key members of the firm’s renowned senior living practice area.

clark lindseyClark-Lindsey has partnered with The Green House Project and Perkins Eastman to help usher in a new and superior standard of care for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses. The introduction of these homes not only marks the first Green House project in Champaign County but also a major step forward for how Illinois providers and regulatory officials are looking to institute efficient and innovative care models for seniors. Green House homes are designed to provide a personalized model of care within a real home setting, replete with an open kitchen, dining room and other common areas, setting them apart from the traditional institutional model that can resemble a hospital or nursing home.

clark lindsey2The new homes, situated on a 10,000 sf footprint, will feature an architectural design where every inch of space has been carefully considered in order to transform the physical environment to feel more like home. From the outdoor courtyard, library and den areas to the open kitchen providing home cooked meals, these amenities encourage social contact among elders and caregivers. The homes’ design is tailored to maintain existing on-site trees as well as acknowledge the natural surroundings with respect to building proportion, scale and form, while also taking full advantage of the expansive views of adjacent Meadowbrook Park.

“Clark-Lindsey is already known within the industry as a leader and innovator when it comes to care,” says Jerry Walleck, the project’s design lead, “and the new Green House homes are a continuation of that. They will provide invaluable care and services to dementia residents and their families, and it’s an enormous privilege to have played our part in making that happen.” Both homes are scheduled to open in late 2016.

Clark-Lindsey Village was founded in 1978 and is the area’s first and only CCRC. It is one of only eight certified Centers for Successful Aging in the U.S. In addition to its forthcoming dementia care small homes, Clark-Lindsey Village offers extensive independent living accommodations, as well as inpatient and outpatient therapy services, assisted living and skilled nursing care at its Meadowbrook Health Center.

The Green House Project is a radically new national model for skilled nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self- contained homes organized to deliver individualized care and meaningful relationships between residents and care staff.

About Perkins Eastman
Perkins Eastman is among the top design and architecture firms in the world. With almost 950 employees in 14 locations around the globe, Perkins Eastman practices at every scale of the built environment. From niche buildings to complex projects that enrich whole communities, the firm’s portfolio reflects a dedication to progressive and inventive design that enhances the quality of the human experience. With work in 46 states and more than 40 countries, the firm’s portfolio includes transportation and public infrastructure, high-end residential, commercial, hotels, retail, office buildings, corporate interiors, schools, hospitals, museums, senior living, and public sector facilities. Perkins Eastman provides award-winning design through its offices in North America (New York, NY; Boston, MA; Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Los Angeles, CA; Pittsburgh, PA; San Francisco, CA; Stamford, CT; Toronto, Canada; and Washington, DC); South America (Guayaquil, Ecuador); North Africa and Middle East (Dubai, UAE); and Asia (Mumbai, India, and Shanghai, China).

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CEDAR SINAI PARK TO BREAK GROUND ON $33 MILLION CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

cedar sinia

Ceder Sinai Park (CSP) is happy to announce it will be breaking ground on a $33 million construction project focused on renovation of the Robison Jewish Health Center and its transformation into a 44-bed post-acute rehabilitation center. The project will also include the construction of two additional buildings with four homes in THE GREEN HOUSE® model – providing 12 beds each (48 total) for an improved model of long-term care.

“We commend Cedar Sinai Park for their vision to further their mission by implementing The Green House model, and their commitment to transform long term care in Oregon” said Susan Frazier, Senior Director, The Green House Project.

CSP is committed to helping people stay at home as long as possible or maintain lower levels of care and is moving forward with this project in response to community needs for post-hospital sub-acute care rehabilitation services to facilitate returning home after a medical event such as a hip replacement or surgery.

Four new homes will be part of the Harold Schnitzer Health & Rehabilitation Care Center, focused on providing state-of-the-art long-term care in the model of Green House homes across the country. These homes will emphasize quality-of-life; person-directed care which results in improved healthcare outcomes for residents who can no longer remain at home due to conditions such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis.

On Wednesday, July 15th, we will officially break ground on the new center. The groundbreaking will take place at 4:00 p.m. on the corner of SW 62nd Avenue and Boundary Street, and will include remarks from CSP and community leaders.

“We are pleased to see this dynamic construction project begin. It is important to Cedar Sinai Park and the entire community that we develop a 21st century service capacity that is both beautiful and able to meet changing healthcare demands,” said Jim Winkler, Capital Campaign Chair.

“Cedar Sinai Park is proud to be working with LRS Architects and R&H Construction on this project” according to David Fuks, CSP Chief Executive Officer. “These two firms represent the highest quality teams and we are glad to be teaming with them on this very important work.”

The Green House Project is a radically new, national model for skilled-nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self-contained homes organized to deliver individualized care, meaningful relationships and better direct care jobs through a self-managed team of direct care staff working in cross-trained roles. Green House homes meet all state and federal regulatory and reimbursement criteria for skilled-nursing facilities.

About Cedar Sinai Park: Cedar Sinai Park provides residential and community-based care to elders and adults with special needs, allowing them to live with comfort, independence, and dignity in a manner and in an environment based on Jewish values. A nonprofit organization, we are committed to delivering a broad-based continuum of care that can be tailored to individuals’ unique needs. Our services include independent and assisted living (Rose Schnitzer Manor), nursing home care (Robison Jewish Health Center), daily respite care (Adult Day Services), affordable housing for seniors and people with disabilities (Rose Schnitzer Tower, Lexington Apartments, Park Tower Apartments, The 1200 Building), in-home care (Sinai In-Home Care), a collaboration with Jewish Family & Child Service), and affordable housing for developmentally disabled adults (Kehillah).

Woodland Park, Virginia’s First Green House Homes, Break Ground in Harrisonburg

 

VMRC Groundbreaking

The imagery was especially powerful at the January 5 Groundbreaking at Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community (VMRC) in Harrisonburg for the first three of 10 homes for Woodland Park.

The Groundbreaking Ceremony included various displays of resident-centered philosophy. Two residents of VMRC’s current long-term care community lifted soil with shovels which were decorated by residents. Residents baked cookies for the reception following the event. And residents assembled commemorative pouches of soil from the site with packets of wildflower seeds which were given to all attendees.

VMRC President and CEO Ronald Yoder summarized the significance of building Woodland Park:

“VMRC’s vision to pursue this project … is rooted in our desire and commitment to respond to the deep yearnings of elders, their children, nieces, nephews and siblings to offer a different choice for long-term care – one that enables elders to continue their normal patterns of daily living and one that responds to the desires and expectations of family members and caregivers.”

And before inviting persons to the site for the Groundbreaking, Ron added, “The small action with a shovel represents a shift from people viewing long-term care as an undesirable destination to a place to continue living and enjoying life as they wish.”

The theme of building a foundation was carried throughout the ceremony. Especially reinforced when attendees were asked to place small stones they had been given into the walls of a 4×4 model of a Woodland Park home. Residents, caregivers, spouses, employees, and donors participated in this part of the program.

Visit VMRC’s photo album on Facebook and at www.vmrcharrisonburg.

Blog Post Contributed by Maureen  Pearson, Director of Communications, VMRC

Woodland Park, Virginia's First Green House Homes, Break Ground in Harrisonburg

 

VMRC Groundbreaking

The imagery was especially powerful at the January 5 Groundbreaking at Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community (VMRC) in Harrisonburg for the first three of 10 homes for Woodland Park.

The Groundbreaking Ceremony included various displays of resident-centered philosophy. Two residents of VMRC’s current long-term care community lifted soil with shovels which were decorated by residents. Residents baked cookies for the reception following the event. And residents assembled commemorative pouches of soil from the site with packets of wildflower seeds which were given to all attendees.

VMRC President and CEO Ronald Yoder summarized the significance of building Woodland Park:

“VMRC’s vision to pursue this project … is rooted in our desire and commitment to respond to the deep yearnings of elders, their children, nieces, nephews and siblings to offer a different choice for long-term care – one that enables elders to continue their normal patterns of daily living and one that responds to the desires and expectations of family members and caregivers.”

And before inviting persons to the site for the Groundbreaking, Ron added, “The small action with a shovel represents a shift from people viewing long-term care as an undesirable destination to a place to continue living and enjoying life as they wish.”

The theme of building a foundation was carried throughout the ceremony. Especially reinforced when attendees were asked to place small stones they had been given into the walls of a 4×4 model of a Woodland Park home. Residents, caregivers, spouses, employees, and donors participated in this part of the program.

Visit VMRC’s photo album on Facebook and at www.vmrcharrisonburg.

Blog Post Contributed by Maureen  Pearson, Director of Communications, VMRC