Green House Blog

Short Term Rehab in The Green House Model – A Case Study

Leonard Florence Center for Living

6x7X3CrHokb6SwAIWDKUKSWCpdd6M78Ay_XOPVuW9LcThe Green House model  was originally designed as a long term care solution where  elders could live for the remainder of their lives. Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) has expanded their Green House homes to include three short term rehab homes within their ten home building in Chelsea, MA. In the webinar, Short Term Rehab in the Green House Model – A Case Study, Ina Hoffman, Director of Admissions, and Jill Tura, Director of Rehabilitation, describe how short term rehab can be delivered in a real home environment, and highlight their positive clinical and financial outcomes. Their decision to incorporate short term rehab into their Green House homes outlines how providing this service has made them   a preferred provider in the community and creates a highly attractive environment that increases consumer demand.

In order to provide high quality care to elders and those who living with diseases such as  Multiple Sclerosis or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, LFCL needed to create a financial situation that  would enable them to serve Medicaid recipients, while managing organizational needs.   Incorporating short term rehab into their Green House homes provides financial balance to their building and allows individuals to receive short term CF00eJRB_q1f5bqRESlaGAnrAXs_IbIOBlU-ZcNFcTYorthopedic, cardiopulmonary, neurological, or medical rehabilitation in a real home environment. Currently, LFCL has up to 30 individuals receiving short term rehab at any given time, averaging 45 admissions per month. Through strategic marketing, seeking connections with Boston area hospitals and Accountable Care Organizations, and referrals from elders and their families, they became a choice provider of short term rehab in their community – and a reputation that proves it.

 

“There are not many places that can do what we do.” Ina says when describing short term rehab in a Green House home as an “Occupational Therapist’s dream.” Rather than stimulating home-like environments, functional, practical therapy is provided seven days a week in a real home to ensure maximum safety and success upon discharge. Those who come to LFCL for rehab  practice activities of daily living with their core rehabilitation team in the common areas of the home, while more personal tasks such as bathing, dressing, and toileting can be done in the privacy of their own bedroom and bathroom. The Green House environment fosters a sense of community and family within the home.  The members of the house encourage each other during therapy sessions, discuss therapy goals and frustrations over meals, and exchange telephone numbers when they return to the community to keep in touch beyond their stay. Because LFCL is within the larger Chelsea Jewish Foundation, when a person is ready to transition to in-home care, they can continue to receive therapy from the same core team, allowing for a continuous, efficient transition of care.

 

By incorporatingD_YEvbOIK7ASoF2DEyGTUyKUR795WiRz3exvUwkEzps short-term rehab into their Green House homes, LFCL created a financial strategy that “keeps the building going.” Short-term rehab created an opportunity to stay true to their mission while providing high-quality, integrated care with positive outcomes, including decreased length of stay, higher overall satisfaction, and decreased rehospitalizations.

 

Interested in learning more about short-term rehab in Green House homes? <<Listen to the webinar recording here>> 

The White House and The Green House Tour the Leonard Florence Center for Living

This week, representatives from the White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) and THE GREEN HOUSE ® Project visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) in Chelsea, MA. The Center is the first urban Green House skilled nursing community in the country. Nora Super, Executive Director (WHCOA) and Rachel Maisler, Deputy Communications Director (WHCOA) traveled from Washington to see, first hand, how The Green House model supports a successful aging and good jobs.  Senior Director of The Green House Project, Susan Frazier and Director of Outreach, Scott Brown, were in attendance; Betsy Mullen, COO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates LFCL, directed the visit.WHCOA Tour picture May 2015

The visit began by spending time with a group of elders who were celebrating National Senior Health & Fitness Day.  Amidst songs and dancing, it was clear that these people are living life to the fullest.  Winnie Murphy, who is 105, told the group she loved living at the LFCL because there “was always something to do and people to visit.” In fact, Winnie is engaged in meaningful activities every day; she goes to the salon to get her hair done about once a week, relaxes with a drink at the monthly Pub Hour, plays bingo as often as possible and attends a daily exercise class.

A key focus of the visit was to highlight the increased quality of life that elders and staff experience in The Green House model.  Because of the high rise setting, the ground floor of the building has become a “main street” of sorts.  The group spent time in the café, deli, spa and outdoor patios as well as the residences where elders receive long-term care and short term rehabilitation.  It was gratifying to see Ms. Super’s reaction to each elder having a private bedroom and bathroom, and the sense of comfort and belonging that one feels in the open floor plan with accessible kitchens and dining areas in every home.  Clearly, this revolutionary model of living made a tremendous impact upon the visitors, which will hopefully lead to tremendous impacts in policy to support the spread of this model across the country.

An added plus: the WHCOA team sent a camera crew to video-tape the tour. We are hopeful that this footage will be featured at the White House Conference on Aging, to be held in Washington, DC on July 13.

Green House homes as an Innovation for Short-Term Rehabilitation

In the December print version of Long Term Living, an article by the Director of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, David Farrell explores the new customer for Short Term Rehab and how The Green House model can meet their needs.

The customer for short-term rehabilitation is changing, and as the baby boomers continue to age, providers must adapt to meet the needs and desires of this influential demographic.  Long Term Living Magazine highlights one of these innovations, by demonstrating how rehabilitation thrives in a Green House setting.

This new patient is more empowered, more likely to question care decisions and seek alternate opinions, and generally be a more active participant in his or her care. The Boomer also expects to remain active, stimulated and social during recovery—not isolated and treated as frail. Given this significant shift in their consumer base, nursing homes must rethink their approach to short-term rehab (and long-term care, for that matter). Boomers will be seeking—and expecting—a lot of it in the coming years.

Director of The Green House Project, David Farrell, writes about this changing customer and the success of The Green House model to meet their needs by highlighting Leonard Florence Center for Living, “The reason that the Green House Project offers such a strong model for short-term rehab boils down to the concept of home. By making elders feel truly at home, the Green House model actually helps residents rehabilitate faster—and in a safer environment.”  Bob Richman experienced rehabilitation at Leonard Florence and shares the difference that he attributes to the real home environment, “I’ve been in skilled rehab two times: once at a traditional nursing home and once here in a Green House home. It’s not just the exercise here that gets you well again…it’s the people around you having a similar experience. It’s coming together around the table for our meals. It really works.”

It is not only the anecdotes of success, but also the data that is telling a positive story, ” On average nationwide, 20 percent of elders return to the hospital within their first 30 days of stay at a nursing home.At Leonard Florence, the rate has been half that—around 10 percent. Staff members also have reported an increase in the number of referrals from discharge planners, orthopedic doctors and repeat customers who need new procedures. ”

The Green House Project currently has 150 homes in 24 states around the country, and sees short term rehabilitation as an innovation that will continue to grow as the customer demands more personalized care in a setting that is both comfortable and effective.

Full Article in Long Term Living >>

 

Barry Berman Earns Prestigious Leading Age Award

Originally printed in the Chelsea Jewish Aug/Sept publication of “Chai-Lights” 

Barry Berman, CEO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation (CJF), has been selected by Leading Age as the 2013 Award of Honor Recipient.  This award, the association’s highest honor, is given in recognition of Mr. Berman’s exemplary leadership and commitment to expanding the world of possibilities for aging.  Individuals from the entire country were considered for this award.  Mr. Berman was selected based upon his outstanding leadership, exceptional service and commitment to quality care.

Under Mr. Berman’s direction, CJF developed Massachusetts’ first mixed-income assisted living, in addition to developing the nation’s first Green House homes in an urban, low-income neighborhood.  Clearly, Mr. Berman has revolutionized housing and care environments for people living with ALS and MS by developing the nation’s first residence for person’s living with these diseases.  Mr. Berman is a true leader and innovator whose passion for meeting the needs of others is self evident in the remarkable organization he has helped to build and the outstanding work that the Chelsea Jewish Foundation does.

Please join us in congratulating Barry Berman on this well-deserved recognition.  Mr. Berman will be presented the award on Sunday, October 27th at the Leading Age Annual Meeting in Dallas, Tx.

Leading Age names The Green House Project a Leadership Program to Watch in 2013

To expand the world of possibilities for aging, LeadingAge members and affiliates touch the lives of 4 million individuals, families, employees and volunteers every day. The work of LeadingAge is focused on advocacy, education, and applied research. CEO, Larry Minnix, shared an inspiring blog about how far our field of aging has come, and he asks the question, “So, how did dramatic change occur over the generations? Did it happen spontaneously? No, it happened because of the leadership from members, many of whom have served their communities for generations!”

Just as Eden Principle #10 states, “Wise Leadership is the lifeblood of any organization”, Larry Minnix calls out a few programs whose leadership is moving our field forward. The Green House Project, with a commitment to research, including a business case, is honored to be named as a leader. Leonard Florence Center for Living was also named as a leader to watch. As the first urban Green House Project and with incredible use of technology to create meaningful lives for those living with ALS and MS, this project is beyond cutting edge.

Thank you to Leading Age for this honor and for the work that you do to support and advance our field.

The Green House Workforce Model

Betsy Mullen is the Guide at Leonard Florence Center for Living

Members of the newly opened Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass. — the nation’s first urban Green House Project — joined the Green House team for a panel discussion at the 2011 LeadingAge conference in Washington, D.C., Oct. 17.

The topic of the discussion was the innovative workforce model pioneered by the Green House. In Green House homes, the focus of staffing is shifted away from administrative roles towards direct care of elders. Each Green House Project has a clinical support team, which includes nurses, therapists, social services, activities, and dietary professionals, working in partnership with the Shahbazim (universal workers who replace traditional CNA’s) to develop and implement individualized care plans for the elders. Continue reading “The Green House Workforce Model”