Green House Blog

Ruta Kadonoff, Named Executive Director of The Pioneer Network

We are thrilled to congratulate, Ruta Kadonoff, former Green House Project team member, on her new role as Executive Director of The Pioneer Network.  The Pioneer Network is an organization that was formed to support, advocate and enhance the work of individuals, organizations, regulators and policymakers who are creating a life-affirming, satisfying and meaningful culture of aging and long-term care.

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Ruta Kadonoff, Newly Appointed Executive Director of The Pioneer Network

“I am honored and excited by this opportunity to serve the Pioneer Network and advance its critically important work,” Kadonoff says in a press release. “I am passionate about seeing our vision and values fully realized and look forward to working hand in hand with innovators and individuals across the country who share this passion, who have come together in this unique gathering place for those of us unwilling to settle for the status quo.”

We look forward to opportunities to collaborate with Ruta and advance our shared vision and passion.

Read the announcement in Long Term Living>>

September is World Alzheimer’s Month…Every 67 Seconds Someone In The United States Develops Alzheimer’s Disease

It’s an amazing statistic and there are many more that accompany it:

  • It is the 6th leading cause of death in our country
  • It is the only cause of death in the top 10 in America that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed
  • One in three Elders die with Alzheimer’s or another dementia
  • Almost two thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease are women

The World Month was established to raise awareness and to increase education ThinkstockPhotos-480845135about the disease.  It is designed to encourage people all around the world to spot the signs of dementia, but also not to forget about loved ones who are living with dementia, or those who may have passed away.

The 2015 report titled “The Global Impact of Dementia” was included in a recent article by Long-Term Living.  It commented on five statistics that we should all know.

Dr. Al Power, who has been named to the Scientific Program Committee for Alzheimer’s Disease International 2015, has provided much insight on this topic to Green House adopters.   His blogs, webinars and presentations have resulted in rich conversation about the disease.  Dr. Power will be conducting an all day preconference session along with a plenary and education session at The Eighth Annual Green House Meeting & Celebration in Broomfield, CO from November 16-18th. The annual meeting is for Green House members only and this year’s theme is Better Together.  The title of Dr. Power’s preconference session is “Reframing Dementia.”  His plenary session is entitled “Living Better Together with Dementia: Taking it Further” and his education session is “Real Life Without Antipsychotic Drugs.”

To learn more about Alzheimer’s click here for information and research from the Alzheimer’s Association.

So, what will you do this month to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s Disease?

 

Technology: Where do we go from here?

Via: Long-Term Living Magazine

Many of us are always trying to determine what technology makes the most sense for our organization…it’s an important issue for day to day operations and of course it has real financial implications.

The Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Collaborative has announced its 2014-2016 Roadmap for technology adoption.  In light of a world filled with devices to keep us connected, it isn’t surprising that many parts of the roadmap deal with that specific issue:  staying connected!

The roadmap was unveiled on the final day of the Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Health IT Summit.  There are five key sections: connected workers, connected partners, connected residents and caregivers, connected health intelligence and connected business imperatives.

Click here to read the full story!

Green House homes as an Innovation for Short-Term Rehabilitation

In the December print version of Long Term Living, an article by the Director of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, David Farrell explores the new customer for Short Term Rehab and how The Green House model can meet their needs.

The customer for short-term rehabilitation is changing, and as the baby boomers continue to age, providers must adapt to meet the needs and desires of this influential demographic.  Long Term Living Magazine highlights one of these innovations, by demonstrating how rehabilitation thrives in a Green House setting.

This new patient is more empowered, more likely to question care decisions and seek alternate opinions, and generally be a more active participant in his or her care. The Boomer also expects to remain active, stimulated and social during recovery—not isolated and treated as frail. Given this significant shift in their consumer base, nursing homes must rethink their approach to short-term rehab (and long-term care, for that matter). Boomers will be seeking—and expecting—a lot of it in the coming years.

Director of The Green House Project, David Farrell, writes about this changing customer and the success of The Green House model to meet their needs by highlighting Leonard Florence Center for Living, “The reason that the Green House Project offers such a strong model for short-term rehab boils down to the concept of home. By making elders feel truly at home, the Green House model actually helps residents rehabilitate faster—and in a safer environment.”  Bob Richman experienced rehabilitation at Leonard Florence and shares the difference that he attributes to the real home environment, “I’ve been in skilled rehab two times: once at a traditional nursing home and once here in a Green House home. It’s not just the exercise here that gets you well again…it’s the people around you having a similar experience. It’s coming together around the table for our meals. It really works.”

It is not only the anecdotes of success, but also the data that is telling a positive story, ” On average nationwide, 20 percent of elders return to the hospital within their first 30 days of stay at a nursing home.At Leonard Florence, the rate has been half that—around 10 percent. Staff members also have reported an increase in the number of referrals from discharge planners, orthopedic doctors and repeat customers who need new procedures. ”

The Green House Project currently has 150 homes in 24 states around the country, and sees short term rehabilitation as an innovation that will continue to grow as the customer demands more personalized care in a setting that is both comfortable and effective.

Full Article in Long Term Living >>