Green House Blog

New York Times Calls The Green House, “A Better Kind of Nursing Home”

Green Hill, West Orange, NJ

At The Green House, vision is merged with rigor, passion with determination, and a belief  that there’s never a best that can’t be made better.   In their article, “A Better Kind of Nursing Home”, The New York Times says, The Green House model is demonstrating that life in long term care can be different. With real life experiences to support the movement, and world-class research to keep improving, the potential for future impact is vast.

“Lots of things look different when you step into a small Green House nursing home.  The bright living and dining space, filled with holiday baubles at this season. The adjacent open kitchen, where the staff is making lunch. The private bedrooms and baths. The lack of long stark corridors, medication carts and other reminders of hospital wards.”

Robyn Grant, public policy director for The National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, emphasizes that the goal of this shift that The Green House Project is leading means “deinstitutionalizing nursing homes, making them more like the way we’ve lived all our lives, with our own routines and familiar objects.”

Green Hill hearth decorated for holidays

The national initiative has committed itself to the rigors of research in pursuit of continued growth.  Research has shown that model components such as consistent and increased staffing, lead to deep knowing of the elder and early detection of health changes, “The [THRIVE] researchers found that Green House residents were 16 percent less likely to be bedridden, 38 percent less likely to have pressure ulcers and 45 percent less likely to have catheters. Avoidable hospitalizations and readmissions were also lower, reassuring observers who wondered if the Green Houses’ emphasis on quality of life meant sacrificing quality of care.”

In a dynamic world and healthcare landscape, it is essential to be a part of the solution. The Green House Project “Compared to traditional nursing homes, no doubt about it,” said Dr. Sheryl Zimmerman of the THRIVE research team. “It’s a preferable model of care.”

Read the Full New York Times Article>>

2015: A Year of Remarkable Growth

bettertogetherbanner_picasa
Banner signed at the 2015 Annual Meeting by Green House adopters

2015 was a year of remarkable growth for The Green House Project. We are coming to a community near you, and our name is recognized as the pinnacle of long term care innovation. The Peer Network is one of those crucial elements that sets us apart and as our network grows, we develop and evolve because of their wisdom. The 8th Annual Green House Meeting was a powerful convening of this network. Green House adopters from around the country come together to learn from leaders in the field and each other.  They gain energy and successful practices toward continued success. To support this sustainability and apply the results of the THRIVE research that will be published in 2016, The Green House Project Thrive-logoreleased a tool to gauge model integrity. This tool will ensure that The Green House core values of Real Home, Meaningful Life and Empowered Staff thrive in all organizations who are living this model every day.

The Green House Project receives a great deal of recognition and media coverage. Here’s just a small sampling of the dozens of stories and accolades over the last few months.

  • Green House Project Founder Hailed as top “Influencer in Aging.” In its first annual list of people that are changing aging and how we think about aging, Next Avenue recognized The Green House Project’s founder Bill Thomas. Read more.
  • The New York Times Highlights Green House Homes. In a recently published story on the trend toward smaller nursing home residences, the author highlights the Green House model. Read more. The_New_York_Times
  •  Recognition at Annual LeadingAge Conference. At this year’s conference in Boston, thousands of attendees got to hear Atul Gawande’s keynote, where he discussed The Green House model and specifically called out the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, MA. Read more. Dr. Eleanor Barbera of McKnight’s visited the Leonard Florence Center while attending the conference and wrote about it. Read more.

The Green House Project is about to end an historic year – there are now 185 Green House homes open in 28 states. Here’s just a sampling of some of the news from Green House projects around the country over the last few months:

  • Washington County (Colorado) Nursing Home Groundbreaking. In a total replacement of its current nursing home, Washington County will be developing 4 Green House homes. This is the second project in Colorado. Read more.
  • Saint Elizabeth Groundbreaking – First in Rhode Island. Rhode Island breaks its moratorium on new nursing home development to approve the first Green House homes in the state. Read More.

    saint e ground breaking
    Groundbreaking at Saint Elizabeth’s Community in Rhode Island
  • Morris Hall Meadows (NJ) Grand Opening. In October, Morris Hall Meadows opened 6 new Green House homes, making it the second Green House project in New Jersey. Read More.
  • Clark-Lindsey (IL) Groundbreaking. In September, Clark-Lindsey broke ground on two Green House homes that will be dedicated to dementia care. This is a major step forward for Illinois providers and regulatory offices looking to spur innovation in the state. Read More.

As we look with hope and gratitude toward the new year, please take a moment to hear Doris Delanus, an elder who lived at The Village of Redford in Michigan, tell us about what these homes mean to her.  Elders Rule! 

Portrait of a Green House Elder: Doris Delanus (2 mins 42 secs) from The Green House Project on Vimeo.

The Green House Project Featured in USA Today, Plus Our Consumer Toolkit

The Green House Project was happy to lend its support to a new USA Today piece published today, entitled The Supplement on Alzheimer’s Disease. The story talks to Green House Project Director Robert Jenkens as part of an “expert panel” (on page 10 of the print version).

Click here for the web version of The Supplement on Alzheimer’s Disease.

The Green House model embodies principles that support elders living with dementia to have full and supported lives. To learn more about the model and to follow us please become a fan of The Green House Project on Facebook today. Find Green House homes in your state.

Finally, learn how to bring Green House homes to your community by downloading the The Green House Project Consumer Toolkit here.