Green House Blog

Joint Provider Surveyor Training: Building Vital Relationships

Susan-Frazier_8924A mutual goal of providers and regulators is for elders to experience high-quality lives, enjoying choice, freedom and dignity. The Green House Project understands this, and supports dialogue and education to build strong relationships among all stakeholders. The Joint Provider Surveyor Training, recently held in Grand Rapids, Michigan, provided an opportunity to spread our message about the importance of partnership, and its necessity to achieve positive outcomes for the future of aging.

As Senior Director of The Green House Project, I joined Renee Cunningham, Director of Nursing for Kalkaska Memorial Health Center, to present the latest research on The Green House model. Renee shared her organization’s journey to adopt The Green House trademark, and the value that they believe it will bring to help them achieve their goal of opening two Green House homes in 2015.

The Green House Project partners with state regulators to understand the specific regulations of each state, and educates them about The Green House model. Since the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1987 was enacted, mandating that nursing homes “…help each resident attain or maintain the highest practicable well-being…” (CMS 1987), person-centered thinking has been inscribed in long-term care policy. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) continue to advance this agenda through regulations and interpretive guidelines that mandate person-centered approaches. It is essential to bring regulators and providers together for vital collaboration. Building those relationships at the policy and advocacy level are essential to achieving meaningful life at the individual level.

"Expect the Best!"

My work often brings to mind my good friend and mentor, Nancy Fox. Nancy is Chief Life Enhancement Officer for Vivage in Colorado, was the first Executive Director of The Eden Alternative™, and has many years’ experience as an administrator and an educator. The lessons she has taught me pop into my head on many occasions.

In 2007, Nancy wrote a book called Journey of a Lifetime: Leadership Pathways to Culture Change in Long-Term Care (available at www.edenalt.org or online booksellers). The book lists ten important principles for enlightened leadership, illustrated by stories of good and not-so-good experiences she has had, and lessons learned. One of these is called “Expect the Best,” a principle that is ignored with alarming regularity in long-term care, on both the provider and the regulator sides.

Here is an example of each:

First, a recent McKnight’s article described a study in the upcoming issue of Geriatric Nursing that can only be described as what my friend Jane Verity would call “a blinding flash of the obvious.” This study of nursing homes in the US and Germany showed that CNAs had a much better work experience if they were notified of the deaths of their elders before discovering it for themselves (such as walking into a room to provide care and finding an empty bed). The study recommended “more mindful” approaches to such transitions for those who have formed close, caring relationships.

Wow. What’s sad about this study—even the need to conduct such a study!—is that it reveals how often we give lip service to honoring our hands-on care partners, but choose actions that say the opposite. Then we are quick to blame those same people for lack of a “work ethic.”

Look at your employee handbook and ask yourself, does this document expect the best of our employees? Does it treat them as responsible adults or as children (or worse yet, as potential criminals)? Then look at the actions and interactions of leaders and managers throughout the day. Are our care partners included in decision-making discussions? Do we ever ask for their opinions or advice?

Expecting the best creates two complementary results—it improves people’s abilities and their accountability. Nancy frequently says that “empowerment is not something you try; it is something you do.” When we approach those who support our elders with an expectation that they are capable of great wisdom and growth, we create an environment where growth can occur and wisdom will blossom. And by treating people as equals, we create an environment where people care about each other and about the consequences of their actions, and accountability thrives.

Such discussions raise the inevitable objection that there are people who will take advantage of your good intentions and try to game the system. Welcome to the planet Earth. The problem not that such people exist; the problem is that we write our policies and choose our actions based on the worst person we can imagine and punish everyone else with our low expectations, rather than addressing (or removing) the individual in question. Nancy would likely say, “Expect the best, (and individually address the worst).”

The second example was raised by Karen Schoeneman, formerly of CMS, in a recent culture change discussion that highlights this issue on the regulatory side. She was upset to hear that surveyors in her home state were not permitting elders to have refrigerators in their rooms because of the concern that a resident with diabetes could potentially enter the room and take something that would not be good for his/her diet.

There is so much wrong with that citation that I could devote an entire post to it. But let’s stick with “Expect the Best,” as it applies to surveyors. The fundamental flaw in our regulatory system, I believe, is that surveyors inhabit a primary identity as enforcers, rather than educators. Therefore, they come into the nursing home expecting the worst and constantly imagining “What could possibly go wrong?”

(Of course, Nancy added her two cents to the discussion thread as only she can do, suggesting that perhaps “surveyors shouldn’t be allowed to drive, because they might hit a diabetic.” If it’s possible to laugh and cry at the same time, that’s what I did when I read her comment.)

Incidentally—to be fair to surveyors—many of them work in states where they are required to be enforcers only, because the rules say that they cannot advise providers, only tell them if what they are doing is “in compliance” or not. Apparently the concern is that surveyors might lose their objectivity if they try to mentor the homes. And apparently the rule makers have never heard of school teachers, who mentor their students every day and still give them quarterly grades. If the regulatory bosses don’t expect the best of their surveyors, then a trickle-down effect at survey time is entirely predictable.

These are two examples of why I sometimes despair that our current system of elder care will never truly create well-being for anyone. There is far too much talk about “culture change” and too little evidence of it. Nancy Fox is one person who has always walked the talk. We would all do well to read, or re-read, Nancy’s book.

Highlights of 2014 for The Green House Project

2014 has been a whirlwind year for The Green House Project. There have been so many relationships, conversations and experiences with people around the country who are making deep change for elders and those working closest to them.  The year culminated at our 7th Annual Meeting and Celebration, where record numbers of Green House adopters came together to capitalize on the momentum, energy and knowledge that is collectively growing.   Working with innovative and high quality organizations, how can we not be inspired, and spurred forward to spread this model even further? It is hard to sum up the year in a way that honors all of these individual moments, but here is a sampling of some of the highlights to demonstrate that this model is not only the right thing to do, but also the smart thing.

There have been a number of firsts:
Green House Homes Opened in Colorado. The grand opening for The Green House Homes at Mirasol, located in Loveland, Colorado, was significant for many reasons. This project marked the first Green House homes in Colorado, the 27th state to open this model, and also utilized public/private partnerships to make this model accessible to low income elders. Read more about this project on Capital Impact Partners‘, website.
Green House Homes Approved in Rhode Island by the Department of Health. While a moratorium on building new nursing home beds has been in place for years in Rhode Island, the state acknowledged the need for an innovative model of long term care. St. Elizabeth Home has received approval to build 4 new Green House homes. Read more.
State Regulators Unanimously Approve Plans for the First Green House Homes in Missouri. Gaining a Certificate of need for new nursing home beds is no small feat. The Healthcare Facilities

Review Committee of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services granted approval for an 80 bed Certificate of Need to build Green House homes in Ozark. Read more.

Some great press coverage:
Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal. Chapter 5 of this best-selling book focuses on culture change and the Green House model. In the media coverage of the book, as well as interviews, there’s a lot of discussion about the Green House model. On Diane Rehm’s show on NPR he called the Green House model “revolutionary.” and The President bought the book to read over the holidays!

Kiplinger. In the retirement planning issue, which covers a variety of topics, including advice on finding the right nursing home. They recommend consideration of organizations that have implemented culture change or that offer Green House homes. Read more.

Research and resources to ensure growth with integrity:
The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE) honored for studies: The longitudinal studies by researchers from top universities, and funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, has been completed. Their work has already received high honors, such as the Ollie Randall Symposium at the 2015 Gerontological Society of America conference. This research provides insights into the quality, cost and sustainability of The Green House and other culture change models.
Design Manual and Model Integrity Process: The Green House team has developed guidelines for architects and operators to build homes that are warm, smart and green (‘green’, meaning a place where people grow). This manual will be used as a tool for groups under contract with The Green House Project. Once opened, Green House homes now participate in a model integrity process to protect their investment in the model and to ensure that the elements of the model will grow and thrive.

And some other great news:
Dr. Bill Thomas’ Second Wind Tour. Susan Frazier and David Farrell joined Dr. Thomas on a 25 city tour to offer audience members powerful insights into slower, deeper, more connected ways of living & working. Watch Susan’s talk
Occupancy Growth Exceeds Expectations. At the Water’s Edge, with newly opened Green House homes, the rush of elders interested in moving in has exceeded expectations. Read more.
Tomah VA Medical Center Opens Two New Green House Homes. The Tomah VAMC became the fourth VAMC campus to offer Green House homes to veterans. Read more.

This is just a sampling of some of the wonderful things happening with The Green House Project. Along with amazing people and organizations, we are transforming the way that we age. To become a part of this movement in 2015, contact us or visit our website: thegreenhouseproject.org

The Skilled Nursing Development Opportunity – Aspiring to Something More

I read with interest a recent article in Senior Housing News- Developers See Opportunity as Old Nursing Homes Become Obsolete. It’s great to see not only that people recognize that the stock of 40+ year old nursing homes is not going to cut it, but to hear the sentiment that the replacement of old nursing homes is an opportunity. But when we think about replacing nursing homes, what are the key considerations? Are we making the most of this opportunity by re-thinking them, or are we simply sprucing up the same institutional approach?

For nursing home providers considering a significant renovation, the article makes the point to do your homework. “Given the relative aging of the post-acute care facilities, some providers are finding that it’s more cost-effective to develop new facilities rather than redesign multiple decades-old properties.”

Also think about the long-term value of your renovation investment – a renovated facility will look good today compared to what’s available, but how will it look against the competition in 20 years? How will it fare as consumer demands continue to evolve?

What I love about the nursing home model discussed in this article is that it’s designed to be a community gathering place. Most current designs and locations segregate their older population from everyone else. This is bad for everybody – Elders don’t get to interact with anyone other than other older people. And younger people don’t have the opportunity to appreciate Elders and to benefit from everything they have to offer. Creating a space that is inviting to the surrounding community, families and friends is a great idea.

On the other hand, I got the sense that at their heart, these facilities are potentially the same old institutional nursing home in a prettier box. In addition to community space, this design will have examination rooms, because that’s what physicians want. As I hear providers embrace the “hospitality” model, with cafes, wireless and flat screen TVs, I wonder if anyone has asked Elders what they want.

I’m also wondering about how these new nursing homes will actually work. Will the design make it easier for people to get around or will it still have long hallways filled with workers hurrying from place to place (albeit on nice carpet)? Will the culture put people first, or will it simply be the same institutional approach? Will the people who work there develop real relationships with the Elders who live there? Is it designed to maintain dignity and create meaningful lives?

There’s no doubt that these new nursing homes will be a huge upgrade over what’s currently available to most people. They’ll be more attractive, and more comfortable than facilities built in the 1960’s, but will the experience really be that different?

If you ask people where they want to spend their last years, they’ll tell you “home.” When Elders are admitted into institutional skilled nursing facilities, they want to go “home.” If an Elder is in long term care, being physically at home is no longer an option. So what can “home” mean in that context? First off, I’m pretty confident it doesn’t mean something that looks like a hotel. I think it means a place that is comfortable and is familiar, and allows them to continue to live their lives as they would if they were living independently. It means having opportunities to make the choices we all expect as adults – when to get up, when to have meals and what to eat, how we spend our time. It means being able to do the things that make life meaningful, and to be respected and known as individuals.

So when we invest in new skilled nursing development, don’t redesign something based on today’s nursing homes. Start with the mission and important values. Think about a design that will work better for Elders and the people who work there. Let’s not squander the opportunity to create something new. Let’s aspire to something better than more attractive institutions.

California Health Report: “This Green House Grows Humans”

Via: California Health Report

When the Green House homes opened in California last fall, there were a number of people who were very happy to see that day come to fruition.  One person who was very pleased to see those doors open was Yolie Zepeda.

Yolie vividly recalls the words of her uncle after he was placed in a state funded nursing home after suffering from a number of health issues.  Her uncle told her that he felt so worthless at the facility, explaining that he could be sitting alone for endless hours in a soiled diaper.  He told her “they actually treat you worse than I’d ever treat a dog.”

Today Yolie is a Shahbaz in the Green House homes, and is happy she can tell a different story.    

Click here to read more about Yolie and her dedication to the Elders in her home…a home that the California Health Report says is “a welcoming vibe that gushes home.”

 

 

Read the story behind the man who led the effort to bring those Green House homes to California, President and CEO of Mt. San Antonio Gardens, Randy Stoll.  Some people come up through academic programs, which Randy would eventually do, but first he ventured in another direction.  Click here to read about his journey in aging services.

AARP Foundation and Weinberg Foundation Invest to Extend Green House Model to Low-Income Seniors

New collaborations build on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s $10 million
program-related investment in THE GREEN HOUSE® Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 11, 2013

CONTACT:
Leslie Lipsick, 415-901-0111, llipsick@fenton.com
Christine Clayton, 609-627-5937, media@rwjf.org

Princeton, NJ — The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) efforts to bring high-quality skilled nursing care to low-income seniors got a boost recently as both AARP Foundation and The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced new investments in The Green House Project. The new commitments bolster the national loan fund for Green House homes that RWJF helped to establish in 2011 with a 10-year, $10 million low-interest credit facility.

AARP Foundation unveiled a new $2.5 million program-related investment (PRI) in innovative housing options for the vulnerable, 50+ population, including The Green House Project. The Weinberg Foundation simultaneously agreed to formalize and grow its existing grant program for skilled nursing facilities that both adopt The Green House model and serve low-income populations. The Weinberg Foundation has committed to a minimum of $8 million in capital grants for Green House residences this fiscal year alone.

Though the three foundations’ investments differ in their details, they share the common goal of bringing a higher and more personalized standard of care to aging Americans in every community. The three also share a joint belief that innovative financing is a vital tool for giving lower-income communities the capital required to develop truly excellent, affordable long-term care options.

Unlike traditional nursing homes that have a more institutional feel, Green House homes are designed from the ground up to look and feel like a real home. In an effort to provide more personalized and dignified care, only six to 12 elders live in each home, and every resident has the comfort of a private room and bathroom, along with the freedom to set his or her own daily routine. Even the care in a Green House home is different, with a small team of trained universal caregivers meeting the majority of needs of the residents. Research shows that a Green House home’s intimate layout, combined with its innovative staffing model, provides residents with four times more personal and social contact than typical nursing homes.

“The Green House Project delivers on a bold vision of better, more dignified care for elders that is spreading widely in communities across the country,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “We are thrilled to have the AARP and Weinberg Foundations join us in investing to spread the impact of this powerful model to all seniors, regardless of income.”

AARP Foundation: Leveraging Investment Instruments to Drive 50+ Housing Innovation

With the use of program-related investments, AARP Foundation aims to create new models of housing that are scalable and replicable, and to increase the sheer number of affordable and adequate housing units available for low-income Americans over 50. With at least 13 million Americans in low-income, 50+ households struggling to find affordable and/or adequate housing, AARP Foundation identified housing as an area ripe for impact investing.

In addition to funding the replication of The Green House model, led by NCB Capital Impact, the $2.5 million investment will also support Enterprise Community Loan Fund, Inc. and ROC USA. The former will use the investment to help finance the creation of affordable rental and rural housing for low-income seniors. The latter will use it to empower owners of mobile homes, a vulnerable and aging group, to cooperatively purchase the land on which their homes are located.

“All of these projects aim to build, retrofit, or purchase safe and affordable housing that not only helps older residents avoid high housing cost burdens, but also addresses their need for community—either by helping them age in place or create a new community based on a non-institutional model,” said AARP Foundation President Jo Ann Jenkins.

Weinberg Foundation: Expanding on an Early Investment in Culture Change

During the last five years, the Weinberg Foundation has made six capital grants for Green House homes, totaling just over $5.5 million, including some of the most innovative adoptions of the model. During that time, the Weinberg Foundation has seen demand for small home nursing models like Green House soar. At the same time, millions of vulnerable older adults have been unable to access the quality, skilled care they need—whether due to limited incomes, high costs of care, or isolation.

To fulfill its vision that every older adult has the opportunity to lead a life of dignity and independence, no matter their ability or income, the Weinberg Foundation has agreed to formalize and expand its Green House development grants program, committing to a minimum of $8 million in capital grants for these residences in the 2014 fiscal year. Among other requirements, applying providers must serve at least 60 percent Medicaid-eligible individuals, with 70 percent preferred, and be open to people of all beliefs.

“All older adults deserve the chance to lead meaningful, engaged lives and to maintain their independence for as long as possible,” said Donn Weinberg, Weinberg Foundation trustee and executive vice president. “Through the combined total of more than $13 million in capital grants already made or planned, the Weinberg Foundation hopes to extend the Green House and other culture-change models to more of our most vulnerable older adults so that they can continue to live robust, healthy lives.”

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: Increasing the Impact of a Long-Time Investment

Since 2002, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has awarded $20 million, primarily to NCB Capital Impact, to develop, test, and evaluate The Green House model. In 2011, the Foundation made a new $10 million program investment to build on its existing support of Green House, with the goal of helping the model achieve greater reach and impact than its current presence (146 homes across 24 states).

Specifically, the PRI lowers the cost of financing Green House projects that serve low-income individuals and low-income areas. NCB Capital Impact serves as administrator for the loan fund and seeks investors to leverage RWJF funding in any one project by a ratio of 4-to-1. The investment was part of RWJF’s larger $100 million “impact capital” commitment designed to help the Foundation and its grantees leverage funding from multiple sources and spread innovative solutions that improve health and health care for all Americans.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, measurable, and timely change. For 40 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter www.rwjf.org/twitter or Facebook www.rwjf.org/facebook.

About The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, one of the largest private charitable foundations in the United States, provides approximately $100 million in annual grants to nonprofits that provide direct services to low-income and vulnerable individuals and families, primarily in the U.S. and Israel. Grants are focused on meeting basic needs and enhancing an individual’s ability to meet those needs, with emphasis on older adults, the Jewish community, and our hometown communities including Maryland, northeastern Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Israel, and the Former Soviet Union. For more information, please go to www.hjweinbergfoundation.org.

About AARP Foundation
AARP Foundation is working to win back opportunity for struggling Americans 50+ by being a force for change on the most serious issues they face today: housing, hunger, income and isolation. By coordinating responses to these issues on all four fronts at once, and supporting them with vigorous legal advocacy, the Foundation serves the unique needs of those 50+ while working with local organizations nationwide to reach more people, strengthen communities, work more efficiently and make resources go further. AARP Foundation is AARP’s affiliated charity. Learn more at www.aarpfoundation.org.

About NCB Capital Impact
NCB Capital Impact helps people and communities reach their highest potential at every stage of life. As a Congressionally chartered, District of Columbia, non-profit community development finance institution, Capital Impact provides financial services and technical assistance nationwide to help make high-quality health care, healthy foods, housing, and education more accessible and attainable, and eldercare more dignified and respectful. Capital Impact has used its depth of experience, cooperative approach, and diverse network of alliances to generate over $1.825 billion in critical investments that create a high quality of life for low income people and communities. www.ncbcapitalimpact.org

About The Green House Project
The Green House Project is a radically new, national model for skilled-nursing care that returns control, dignity and a sense of well-being to elders, their families and direct care staff. In the Green House model, residents receive care in small, self-contained homes organized to deliver individualized care, meaningful relationships and better direct care jobs through a self-managed team of direct care staff working in cross-trained roles. Green House homes meet all state and federal regulatory and reimbursement criteria for skilled nursing facilities. http://thegreenhouseproject.org/
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Sunshine State to Welcome the First Skilled Nursing Green House Homes at John Knox Village

These are definitely exciting times at John Knox Village in Pompano Beach, Florida!  Last week their Board of Directors approved the development of THE GREEN HOUSE® residences at the Village and renovations to their current Health Center. 

“This project ensures our ability to fulfill our health care contract with our residents at the level and quality of care they expect from us,” said Board Chairman William Knibloe, II. “Further, it provides for our employees the opportunity to be part of the most important development and progressive care giving to seniors existing today.” 

The $34-plus million project will be located on the northwest corner of The Village’s 65-acre campus.  There will be seven floors, with the main floor featuring a community area for all Elders.  The other six floors will each have two Green House homes.  Each home will have 12 private bedrooms and bathrooms, plus a living area and kitchen.

Groundbreaking is slated for July, with the first Elders moving in October 2015.

Click here to read more about this development!

May marks 10 years Since The First Green House Homes Opened Their Doors

It has been 10 years since Mississippi Methodist Senior Services in Tupelo, MS opened the first Green House project in the country. Throughout May, The Green House Project will celebrate this pioneering organization, and the revolution that they sparked. On Sunday, May 5, there was a block party to celebrate this milestone, with Green House team members and Dr. Bill Thomas in attendance. Check out the photos here and Follow us on twitter at #Tupelo10.  

Steve McAlilly, the visionary leader who believed in The Green House model and brought it to his organization tells a story about its impact:

There was a retired methodist preacher who had Alzheimer’s. He lived in our Alzheimer’s unit in the old ward. He had an eight-year-old grandson who refused to come see him in that environment. His parents couldn’t get him to go see his grandaddy. His disease was so advanced he wasn’t awake but 4 hours a day. But he was one of the first people in the world to move into green house. People would ask what is he going to get out of it? He’s barely awake, has to be fed. But we believed that bringing him to the hearth, to the supper table, something would get through and it would make a difference.

So every day the Shahbazim would get him dressed and bring him to the table. Before too long he was awake again, and his grandson would come back to see him. He came to see his grandaddy so much he knew the name of every elder and every Shahbaz in the house. If that’s the only thing we did we can say it’s worth it. Whatever sweat and tears we had it was worth it.

The Green House Business Case Toolkit

For the past several years, the provider community has been asking The Green House Project for more information about the financial performance of the model. The Green House Project has recently created a business case model that is compelling and which answers many outstanding questions. In addition, it also includes recent Consumer Research that helps explain the high value that consumers place on core features of the Green House model. In today’s long term care market, success for nursing home operators depends on having an efficient model that gives consumers what they want in a way that stands out against the other options available.

The Green House model does exactly that. The model’s dramatic reinvention of long-term care has proven to be immediately recognizable and preferred by residents and their families. The Green House model radically transforms the environment, organization and philosophy of long-term care to create a model that looks and feels like a real home. Over the last decade, Green House homes have set a new standard for quality care with a model that is both proven and practical. Today, there are hundreds of Green House homes open or in development in the majority of states.

The Business Case Toolkit includes a high level brochure, a full business case report and a 12 minute video, designed to answer your questions about the financial viability of The Green House model. The Green House model makes sense not only from a quality of life perspective, but also from a business perspective. Operating a Green House home can increase the occupancy and revenue while keeping the costs the same, compared to the traditional nursing home. And more importantly, the strong financial benefits of The Green House model can enhance your organization’s ability to meet its quality and service mission.

To download the Business Case Toolkit, click here. If you have additional thoughts or questions, please call Maura Porcelli at 703-637-2311.

Green House homes are Coming to California

Joanne Handy, CEO of LeadingAge California provided the introduction in her publlication, Agenda, to  the feature article on The Green House Project, “The Green House model was born from necessity – from a realization that there had to be an alternative to caring for older adults. But without the persistence of a relatively small group of people, this new and innovative model may never have seen the light of day. And just as Mt. San Antonio Gardens is helping to lead change with its Green House, [Leading Age California] is helping to lead change by stimulating and fostering innovation.” The Green House Project is grateful to the leadership and partnership of many groups in California, together we are creating real homes for elders in this state.

In California, “the state’s population continues to age rapidly. The number of Californians over 65 is expected to
double – if not triple, by 2030, and seven in 10 of those seniors will need long-term care at some point.”  There is a call for innovation in long term care, a need for a model that will care for people as individuals, putting their person-hood at the same level as their medical needs.

After many years of striving to partner with regulators in the state, “two new homes will open at the Mt. San Antonio Gardens senior community in Pomona, Calif. They’ll fit right in among the apartments and cottages – with their patios and gardens – that already populate the 30-acre campus, beside its putting green, arts center and more. But these homes will be different. In fact, they’ll usher in the beginning of a new era of a nursing-home care in California.”

The gains made by Mt. San Antonio Gardens will be further solidified through legislation, “Late last year, Governor Brown signed into law Senate Bill 1228, introduced by State Senator Elaine Alquist (D-Santa Clara)… The bill will facilitate the development and delivery of “skilled nursing care in a homelike, noninstitutional setting” like never before, by creating The Small House Skilled Nursing Facilities Pilot Program.” Housed in the Department of Health, this bill calls for 10 organizations to participate in this pilot program which will demonstrate the positive outcomes that come from creating real home, meaningful life and good jobs in the long term care field.

The Green House Project urges every eligible provider to consider applying for this unprecedented opportunity to bring small home, person-centered care to market with the urgency that consumers are demanding and the efficiency for which providers are striving. To read the full article in the Leading Age California publication, click here.

 

Relational Coordination-A Practice with Big Benefits

Via Provider Magazine

As we all know advances in medical equipment and technology play an important role in the care we provide Elders, but leaders must remember that staff and their relationships have the greatest influence on performance.   In the latest edition of Provider Magazine, relational coordination is explored as a critical element for high-performing nursing homes.  David Farrell, the new Director of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project, is one of three authors for the article.

Deep, knowing relationships are the foundation for Green House homes and support the core value of Meaningful Life.

Read more about the evidence that supports relational coordination and tell us what you think!

Leading Age names The Green House Project a Leadership Program to Watch in 2013

To expand the world of possibilities for aging, LeadingAge members and affiliates touch the lives of 4 million individuals, families, employees and volunteers every day. The work of LeadingAge is focused on advocacy, education, and applied research. CEO, Larry Minnix, shared an inspiring blog about how far our field of aging has come, and he asks the question, “So, how did dramatic change occur over the generations? Did it happen spontaneously? No, it happened because of the leadership from members, many of whom have served their communities for generations!”

Just as Eden Principle #10 states, “Wise Leadership is the lifeblood of any organization”, Larry Minnix calls out a few programs whose leadership is moving our field forward. The Green House Project, with a commitment to research, including a business case, is honored to be named as a leader. Leonard Florence Center for Living was also named as a leader to watch. As the first urban Green House Project and with incredible use of technology to create meaningful lives for those living with ALS and MS, this project is beyond cutting edge.

Thank you to Leading Age for this honor and for the work that you do to support and advance our field.