Green House Blog

A Nurse Says, “Safety Third”

We could entitle the latest “Let me say This about That,” Nurse-Speak for Dummies as Mary Hopfner-Thomas, my co-host, and I (two non-nurses) unpack the conversation between two nurses, Green House Senior Director Susan Ryan and Tammy Marshall, chief experience officer at Thrive Senior Living. Tammy said, “There is a way of knowing that nurses have…that is unique to our profession…it is the gift of this time, because it is addressing the invisible needs of a person.” Their discussion, on episode 3 of Elevate Eldercare, echoes a guest column in McKnight’s in which Tammy said that nurses will see us through the pandemic. The focus of the conversation was not on the technical skills of nurses, but rather how to couple the technical skills with the human element—to see each person and support their individual needs, the task of nurses and non-nurses alike. 

Tammy Marshall, chief experience officer, Thrive Senior Living

As Tammy shared, COVID-19 has given us a magnifying glass and exposed the good things as well as the challenges in economics, leadership, long-term care, and basic humanity. 

Mary and I reflected on their conversation as a discussion in contrasts: Pathogenic vs salutogenic, adaptive vs technical leadership, and certainty vs ambiguity. I was fascinated to learn new terms from Tammy and then dive deep into the origins and applications in today’s world. Pathogenic is the treatment of the disease and it’s the most common way healthcare is delivered in our Western society. But Tammy reminded us that the U.S. is the most flagrant user of pathogenic model with regard to COVID-19. It would appear we keep using the same method and expect different results. Isn’t this the definition of insanity?

I was fascinated by Tammy’s mention of salutogenesis, so I did a deep dive into it. I learned that Microsoft Word does not recognize as a real word, as evidenced by the red squiggles appearing each time I type the word. Salutogenesis is defined as the “origins of health.” It was coined by Aaron Antonovsky in the 1979 book, Health, Stress and Coping. The chief question in the salutogenic model is “what makes people healthy?” Tammy answered this with a harken back to the basics of nursing a la Florence Nightingale: good nutrition, fresh air, sunlight, sleep, and movement. 

Mary was particularly struck by the simplicity and yet brilliance of this basic approach, and we agreed that a good question we can all ask is, “What would Florence do?” Imagine if long-term care providers approached care by seeking to answer the question, “What is the most healing environment for each elder?” and “How might things be different?” These questions move us into what Tammy described as “adaptive leadership.” It’s about asking the right questions and believing there is more than one right answer. It pushes us toward creativity. 

As Tammy described the steps she and her team took communicate with elders and staff, she noted that “we crave certainty.” COVID-19 has given us a lot of uncertainty and ambiguity. What is open or not open, how do we best stay safe, will schools open or not, should we or shouldn’t we do X, when will this end? I loved how Thrive Senior Living developed a compulsive communication strategy to give as much certainty as they could, with a measure of openness and transparency.

As part of our discussion on surplus safety, Mary and I shared one of our favorite Atul Gawande quotes from his book, Being Mortal: “We want autonomy for ourselves and safety for those we love.” As Tammy notes, safety needs to come in third, not first, as is the case in so many nursing homes. That discussion got me thinking—I’m blessed to be a grandmother to a wonderful almost one-year-old. A couple weeks ago I babysat her, and she crawled to her favorite end table with the coasters she loves to bang on the table. She was standing, but not quite an independent walker. She lost her balance, fell, and hit her toothless gums on the table. There was a looong silence before the heart wrenching wail. And there was blood. Never, ever, ever did I want I my precious granddaughter to experience pain or injury. But I do want her to walk independently, to gain confidence in herself, to know that if something happens, I will be there to love and support her. My job as grandma is to love her, foster her growth and development, and keep her safe. Safety third. 

How can we get more comfortable with that kind of an approach with elders? I know there are so many things about how the one-year-old and the frail 90-year-old are different. And yet, they, like all of us, may not be as different as we want to believe. In my opinion, safety third could be a gamechanger in long-term care. The Green House Project’s Best Life approach to supporting elders living with dementia calls this embracing the dignity of risk. 

On “Let Me Say This About That,” I introduced Tammy as a thinker and as someone who challenges me to think. She certainly delivered on that account and I hope Mary and I will likewise challenge you to think deeply about these important topics. In fact, you may want to go back the original Elevate Eldercare podcast and listen to the Susan and Tammy discussion one more time!

Listen to the podcast here:

Apple Podcast): https://lnkd.in/dxMNKrB

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/elevate-eldercare

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6Exvwt070aeATvAC0uxFmo…

Marla DeVries is director of resource development for The Green House Project and cohost of “Let Me Say This About That,” the Friday Recap of the Elevate Eldercare podcast.

Awe and Gratitude Amid COVID-19

Audrey Weiner
Audrey Weiner
Former President & CEO
The New Jewish Home

On behalf of the entire Board of Directors, Vice Chair Audrey Weiner delivered some very heartfelt remarks to Green House partners last week as they gathered virtually to share updates about their work during the COVID-19 pandemic. We thought her very eloquent words were worth sharing with everyone, as her message applies across all of senior living:

“First, good afternoon or good morning to each of you. And many thanks for taking time out of your day. Each day, I am sure, is becoming increasingly more complex for each of you.

“My message, on behalf of the board of directors, is really a very simple one. It is one of awe and gratitude to each of you for all that you are doing.

“While we have all lived through uncertainty and crises, hurricanes and tornadoes, horrible fires, economic downturns, blackouts and civil unrest, September 11th, flu, SARS, H1N1, and for some, the AIDS crisis, nothing in my view has prepared us for this pandemic. We are simultaneously desperately wanting to do the right thing for elders, the individuals who work in our organizations, our volunteers, and the community, while also being concerned about our families, knowing that the demands across communities are extraordinary and complex.

“In some cases, some of you have parents who are older and in at-risk groups. In other cases, you have children who are concerned that you are going to work every day and what you might bring home. There are new babies, new grandchildren, and every day, greater unknowns.

“There are the realities of supplies, concerns about the shortages of medications and antibiotics, challenges in physician visits, challenges in providing rehab, and attempts by government to do the right thing around telehealth, testing, and survey. There are heartbreaking stories about visitors restricted amid moments of death.

“But what is clear to me is that the values of The Green House Project, the ways in which living, care, and relationships are structured in Green House homes, provide what seems like the strongest framework for the best outcomes.

“As I read about nursing homes around the country, especially in the state of Washington, and the surprise on the part of the press that staff are rotating throughout facilities, the issue of inadequate staff, staff working in multiple facilities and multiple shifts, I wonder if anyone has really been listening to the concerns about providing the best possible care of elders.

“I do hope, on a macro level, that there are lessons we will learn as part of this pandemic, and hopefully there will be lessons that allow us to strengthen the long-term care system not only in America, but around the world.

“So, I end where I began, which is with awe and inspiration for all you are doing every day and how you are juggling myriad responsibilities. On behalf of the board, we are endlessly grateful for your intellect, your heart, your inspiration, and your values.

“Please know that we want to be there for you in any way we can be helpful. Above all, please do try to take time to care of yourselves.”








Dementia Care: Reminiscence versus Real

A senior housing operator approached me recently about endorsing his

Anne Ellett, NP, MSN, Dementia Specialist

new memory care development. It sounded lovely—he said it was designed to feel like a neighborhood—the residents living with dementia could wander down the street to visit friends and partake in different activities going on throughout the neighborhood. He spoke of the effort and expense put into the design with the goal of offering the residents more choice and access to real experiences.

When I visited, however, it felt a little eerie. It wasn’t a street, but rather an indoor lobby and hallway area with facades from the 50s and 60s. Bobby Darin’s “Mack the Knife” played over the hidden speakers and there were framed posters of Jackie Kennedy and Dean Martin on the walls. Residents could wander from the old-fashioned soda counter to the baby-doll room with bassinets and doll clothes to the plastic bowling pins set up at the end of the hallway. Pretend mailboxes were placed along the hallway.

Residents were playing pool, and few more sat around watching them. Female residents were encouraged to go into the doll room and hold the dolls or write postcards to put in the mailboxes. The tour guide said that the families were thrilled there was such a nice place for their loved ones with dementia to live.

While I can appreciate the desire to create a nice environment for people living with dementia, I challenge us to spend our time—as well as creative expertise and even money—toward offering real experiences and real life.

If we offer props or facades of the real thing, aren’t we assuming that a person living with dementia won’t know the difference? That they are incapable of participating in real relationships and real experiences? What if we instead invest our time and financial resources toward offering real life—wouldn’t that offer more dignity?

There is a lovely video of a memory care community in Australia known as Starrett Lodge. This short film, entitled, “Finding the Why; Enabling Active Participation in Life in Aged Care,” shows great examples of real experiences and real engagements for people living with dementia.

I hope you’ll take a few minutes to enjoy it: https://youtu.be/hZN1CyEiFNM.

If you are interested in hearing more about this topic, I will present a webinar that addresses the issues of “real vs. fake” on April 9 for The Green House Project. You can register for it here: HERE.

Let’s offer real life, and the belief that people living with dementia can participate, can contribute, and can enjoy real experiences.

Anne Ellett, NP, MSN

Green House Model Gains Traction as Providers See Payoff

This may very well be the right time for your organization to consider Green House homes.

In a recent post by Senior Housing News they highlighted THE GREEN HOUSE® Project as a way to revamp traditional nursing care, explored the return on investment for Green House homes, and discussed how some providers have adopted the model to address specific concerns in their state.

The physical environment of each Green House home is designed to transform the institutional nursing facility into a small, residential environment that is home to 10 to 12 elders.  Green house homes fit within the current regulatory and reimbursement structures, and are thus able to nurture people of all abilities, disabilities and financial circumstances.

The story explained that “As regulations mandated by the Affordable Care Act emphasize initiatives related to providing better patient experiences, better outcomes and at lower costs—especially considering the looming threat of hospital readmissions for SNFs beginning in 2019—a Green House model may be able to produce cost savings and operational efficiencies for SNFs.”

Read the entire story here and find out how The Green House model has been developed in different parts of the country.