Green House Blog

St. John’s Selects Vice President of Skilled Services: Nate Sweeney

The Green House Project Team congratulates Nate Sweeney on his new position with St. John’s!

Rochester, NY via The Post Aug 22, 2018

St. John’s recently announced that Nate Sweeney joined its team as vice president of skilled services.
Sweeney is bringing 17 years of experience in the health care industry, with nearly a decade spent in long-term care.
Sweeney will lead St. John’s skilled nursing operations and focus on developing a nonmedical model of long-term care through advancement of organization directors, processes and culture. He will be responsible for supervising and developing the clinical and administrative businesses of skilled services including Penfield’s Green House Homes, St. John’s main campus of 400 residents and its medical-day program.

St. John’s Penfield Green House homes in Rochester.

“We’re confident Nate’s track record for strong leadership, experience, innovation and passion is a great match for our organization and team,” St. John’s President and CEO Charlie Runyon said. “Under Nate’s leadership, St. John’s will continue to advance its mission and evolve our services to provide the highest quality of care for our residents.“
Sweeney has extensive experience in the health care industry, specifically with exploring and operationalizing new models of care.  Most recently, he served as executive director of the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton Health Care in Baltimore. There he spearheaded the development of a new division in the organization that focused on resource development for the community, training and education for medical and social service providers and direct community programming.
Prior, Sweeney spent five years with the Catholic Charities of Baltimore where he drove two major changes for the organization. First, he worked with its nursing home, The Neighborhoods at St. Elizabeth, to change the culture of long-term care from pure medical to one focused on its residents. Next, he led the effort for the licensing and opening of The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Green House Residence at Stadium Place, a program of Catholic Charities and a Green House Home.
Sweeney earned his master’s degree in management of aging services from the University of Maryland Baltimore Country and his Bachelor of Arts in education from University of Illinois. Outside of the office, he serves on the LGBT Aging Issues Network Council for the American Society on Aging. Sweeney resides in Rochester.

The Post

Living the Good Life: Dr. Lemuel Rogers

Living

 

“Living the good life” is a blog series celebrating the lives of people living with dementia in Green House homes.  In Green House homes across the country, elders are creative, resourceful and whole people who have a valuable story to share.

Dr. Lemuel Rogers

“Without connections to the world that nurtures our human spirit, we hasten decline” -Susan Ryan, Senior Director, The Green House Project
dr r portraitOur lives are a rich tapestry of interests and experiences, woven together across time.  Sharing and celebrating our unique stories ensures that our personhood is preserved, even as our needs change.  Dr. Lemuel Rogers, was the epitome of dignity; a dapper, intelligent man with a great smile and beautiful singing voice.  He was well known in the community as a respected doctor, and leader of his church.  Meaningful life is a core value of The Green House model.  The means that a person must be deeply known, and have the power to maintain their identity through connections and engagement.

For Dr. Rogers, that meant being respected and acknowledged for the expertise and reputation that took a lifetime to build.  In the home, he preferred to be called “Doctor”, and frequently perused medical journals with former St. John’s medical director, Al Power.  Staying connected to the community that he loved, shahbazim (care staff) supported Dr. Rogers to attend the annual African-American Health Symposium, a church event dr r fraternitydedicated to him and his wife, Gloria.  Being honored for one’s gifts is essential to living the good life.

Work hard, play hard.  Dr. Rogers was also an active member in his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi. His fraternity brothers were frequent visitors at The Green House homes, bringing joy and beautiful music. Dr Roger’s loved to sing and was able to share his talents with others in his home.  See the below video of Dr. Rogers singing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”.

 

Often, those living with dementia become known solely by their diagnosis.  The beautiful tapestry gets lost amidst the behaviors and medications. In a Green House home, however, the value is placed on WHO that person is, and WHAT will support them in living the good life.  Dr. Rogers was serious, but had a great sense of humor.  dr. r group shotYou really felt like you’d done something special when you made him laugh. When children would come to visit, he would shake their hands very formally when he met them and they loved it. His dementia was pretty advanced by the time he moved to The Green House home, but when a doctor talked with him, or his church or fraternity visited, he always sat up a little straighter, shone a little brighter, and rose to the occasion in conversation. The man just…exuded dignity.

 

Environments for Aging, Impact of Community based Green House homes

Green House Chief Operating Officer, Susan Frazier, joins SWBR architect, Rob Simonetti, to present, “A Community-based Green House Approach—Development Goals, Opportunities, and Outcomes” at the upcoming Environments for Aging conference in New Orleans on Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m (we are exhibiting: BOOTH 103)


This seminar will explore the unique development opportunities available to providers and developers collaborating to provide healthcare via a decentralized community based approach. Presenters will explore the objectives of (re)integrating elders into their hometown communities in lieu of a centralized healthcare campus.


Participants will consider opportunities to leverage the strength and skills of local developers in this effort. Using the nations’ first Community-based Green House project as a case study, attendees will examine common goals of the provider and developer and will learn the potential marketing, cost, and approval benefits associated with pairing a healthcare occupancy with a small scale residential development.

Moving Day for St. John’s in Rochester!!

REPOSTED

Visit the original post at ChangingAge.org

“But let there be spaces in your togetherness and let the winds of the heavens dance between you. Love one another but make not a bond of love: let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.”

Khalil Gibran

The above quote was posted today by Susan Thomas for St. John’s “Eden Quote of the Day”, in honor of the first three Elders moving into our community Green Houses in Penfield, New York. This is the culimination of an incredible journey for St. John’s Home.

It has been exactly a decade since I went to hear Bill Thomas give a talk in Utica about his latest thoughts about Elderhood. At that talk, Bill described his concept of “doing vs. being”, and his visions for “Eldertopia”.

In 2003, the first Green Houses opened in Tupelo, Mississippi. Our CAO, Veronica Barber went to visit them, and on her return she told our CEO, Charlie Runyon, “We have to do this.”

Then about four years ago, with the encouragement of former DOH Dormitory Authority Director Tom Jung and Assistant Health Commissioner Mark Kissinger, we decided to take one more very big step: we decided to bring Elders back to true community engagement, by moving off campus and integrating our Green Houses into residential communities.

This set off a series of twists, turns and setbacks that pushed us back a few years in our timeline, but what we leanred in that process about our vsision, our strengths and challenges, and about our Eden journey was priceless.

And today is the payoff as, for the first time in our nation, the first pioneering Elders move to a pair of small houses 11 miles away from the main campus, nestled in the multigenerational Arbor Ridge community. Guide Rebecca Priest has been the lighthouse for this journey and her group of shahbazim, nurses and other supportive care partners is truly incredible. Very soon after, the remaining 17 Elders, people with diverse needs and abilities, will follow.

So many people have put their hearts and souls into this journey that it is impossible to mention them all. In addition to the visionary leaders mentioned above, I must make a special note of Joanne Braunle, our Project Manager, who formerly worked on NASA contracts and showed us that culture change really is rocket science! The builders at Pridemark, architects at SWBR, and our pre-design work with Emi Kiyota all made incredible contributions to the beautiful, warm and functionally versatile houses we open today.

And of course, a huge thank you to The Green House Project, especially Robert Jenkens and Susan Frazier for their guidance and tireless advocacy, and to Bill and Jude Thomas and the Eden Alternative, who have helped shape our new vision of Elderhood that will truly be a game-changer in providing living options for Elders with skilled needs across the nation and beyond.

Way to go, St. John’s; my hat is off to you!!

Moving Day for St. John's in Rochester!!

REPOSTED

Visit the original post at ChangingAge.org

“But let there be spaces in your togetherness and let the winds of the heavens dance between you. Love one another but make not a bond of love: let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.”

Khalil Gibran

The above quote was posted today by Susan Thomas for St. John’s “Eden Quote of the Day”, in honor of the first three Elders moving into our community Green Houses in Penfield, New York. This is the culimination of an incredible journey for St. John’s Home.

It has been exactly a decade since I went to hear Bill Thomas give a talk in Utica about his latest thoughts about Elderhood. At that talk, Bill described his concept of “doing vs. being”, and his visions for “Eldertopia”.

In 2003, the first Green Houses opened in Tupelo, Mississippi. Our CAO, Veronica Barber went to visit them, and on her return she told our CEO, Charlie Runyon, “We have to do this.”

Then about four years ago, with the encouragement of former DOH Dormitory Authority Director Tom Jung and Assistant Health Commissioner Mark Kissinger, we decided to take one more very big step: we decided to bring Elders back to true community engagement, by moving off campus and integrating our Green Houses into residential communities.

This set off a series of twists, turns and setbacks that pushed us back a few years in our timeline, but what we leanred in that process about our vsision, our strengths and challenges, and about our Eden journey was priceless.

And today is the payoff as, for the first time in our nation, the first pioneering Elders move to a pair of small houses 11 miles away from the main campus, nestled in the multigenerational Arbor Ridge community. Guide Rebecca Priest has been the lighthouse for this journey and her group of shahbazim, nurses and other supportive care partners is truly incredible. Very soon after, the remaining 17 Elders, people with diverse needs and abilities, will follow.

So many people have put their hearts and souls into this journey that it is impossible to mention them all. In addition to the visionary leaders mentioned above, I must make a special note of Joanne Braunle, our Project Manager, who formerly worked on NASA contracts and showed us that culture change really is rocket science! The builders at Pridemark, architects at SWBR, and our pre-design work with Emi Kiyota all made incredible contributions to the beautiful, warm and functionally versatile houses we open today.

And of course, a huge thank you to The Green House Project, especially Robert Jenkens and Susan Frazier for their guidance and tireless advocacy, and to Bill and Jude Thomas and the Eden Alternative, who have helped shape our new vision of Elderhood that will truly be a game-changer in providing living options for Elders with skilled needs across the nation and beyond.

Way to go, St. John’s; my hat is off to you!!