Green House Blog

THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

For Immediate Release: Friday, July 10, 2015

 Contact: Rachel McLean, rmclean@capitalimpact.org, 703-850-1897

Kavan Peterson, kavanpeterson@gmail.com, 206-305-2798

 

THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

Innovative Model for Elder Care Receives Attention from National Leadership

Arlington, VA: The Green House Project’s landmark approach to skilled nursing care will be highlighted at the White House Conference on Aging.  The objective of the conference, which happens only once every 10 years, is to identify and advance actions to improve the quality of life of older Americans, and to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

Since 2003, Green House homes have gone beyond simply providing quality medical care to elders: they’ve offered an environment and support system that enables each person to retain their individuality, and to live in a real home.

Nora Super, executive director at the White House Conference on Aging, recently visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Massachusetts and video footage from this visit will be shown during the event.  This conference will draw greater attention to the model that is changing the face of elder care throughout the country.

“We live in an exciting era of growth and change in which outdated models of long term care are, at long last, being disrupted and replaced,” said Bill Thomas, geriatrician and founder of The Green House Project, who will attend the conference. “I am delighted that the White House Conference on Aging will be bringing well deserved attention to how we’re helping America reimagine care and caregiving in the 21st Century.”

Green House homes, which serve only 10-12 elders at a time, have private rooms and baths and a common, open kitchen. Supportive and versatile caregivers deliver outstanding care and engage in deep knowing relationships with elders. By comprehensively transforming the architecture, organizational design and philosophy of care, the model provides elders with high quality health care and a high quality of life that far exceeds the experience in traditional nursing homes.

In 2003, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation helped pioneer the first Green House home in Tupelo, Mississippi. Today, more than 180 Green House homes are in existence in 28 states across the country, and more than 150 are in development.

Not only are Green House homes rising in popularity, they have been shown to reduce costs of care and treatment and offer a solution to delivering higher quality care at a competitive cost in the U.S.

“The Green House model is based in the belief that all people deserve to live their whole life to its fullest,” said Susan Frazier, senior director of The Green House Project. “With a decade of proven success, we are at a tipping point for the growth of this model and see the power that real home has on the health and wellbeing of elders and those who love them.”

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The Green House Project

A partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Capital Impact Partners and the Center for Growing and Becoming, The Green House Project provides consulting, organizational development services,  and ongoing support to providers and local organizations to support the development and operation of Green House homes across the country. To date, more than 180 Green Home homes are in operation.

 

 

The Green House Model: Person-Directed Relationship-Based Care…An Important Part Of The Conversation For Those Living With Alzheimer ’s Disease.

The “I’ll Be Me” documentary featuring music legend, Glen Campbell has meant a new surge in the discussion about Alzheimer’s disease and how important our person centered perspective needs to be part of the conversation to increase awareness that people living with dementia are creative, resourceful and whole.

Director of The Green House Project, Susan Frazier, recently served on a panel after the showing of the film in Arlington, Virginia—the room was packed with an audience of more than 200 people all eager to ask questions and find out more about the disease.

People with dementia do best when they live within a caring community.  The Green House core values: Meaningful Life, Real Home, and Empowered Staff and the essential practices of the model support each aspect of life for all people living with dementia, and truly, all people living in the homes.

With more than 25 years of experience operationalizing and advancing person-directed care, former speech therapist and long term care administrator, Karen Love, wrote a blog about what needs to happen to encourage others to develop person-directed care.

She points to the white paper in January 2013 titled “Dementia Care:  The Quality Chasm” that provides the consensus definition and framework for person-centered dementia care.

Karen says that successfully evolving to person-centered dementia care practices will require the efforts of all stakeholders including individuals living with early stage dementia, family members and other care partners and healthcare practitioners.

Tell us what you think about the documentary OR your thoughts about person-centered care!

Thought Leaders in Aging Gather at the 2014 Pioneer Network Conference: THE GREEN HOUSE® Project Leadership Among Those Presenting

“Journey to the Heartland” was the theme for the 2014 Pioneer Network Conference held last month, and many indeed made the journey!  Over 1,200 people made the trip to Kansas City for a chance to network and learn with others who are deeply committed to the cultural transformation of long term care.  The Green House Project is a true trailblazer in this movement and we are strong supporters of the conference.  Green House team members, David Farrell and Susan Frazier were presenters at two different sessions during this national event.

Nurses have a critical role to play in supporting deep transformation within aging services.
“Nurses Building Relationships for Organizational Transformation” was a session co-led by Susan and former Green House team member, Anna Ortigara who is now with PHI.  Both Susan and Anna are nurses and can speak first-hand about nurses engaged in culture change.  The session discussed the need to build effective communication strategies that will engage both the Elders and direct care staff members.  The discussion also explored how nurses as leaders, partners, gerontological specialists and teachers are faced with many more opportunities to enhance quality of life and quality of care.   The Green House model is designed to support Clinical Support Team Members, which includes nurses, in developing partnerships with individuals and self-managed work teams.

“THE GREEN HOUSE Model –Delivering Quality of Life and Bottom Line Results” was the special research session delivered by David to attendees.  He confronted the myth that The Green House model is not viable—with over 150 Green House homes operating in 25 states, the innovators who adopted the model are happy with their consumer satisfaction and their bottom lines.  David shared data from operating Green House homes that demonstrates an excellent return on their investment, and their decision to build even more Green House homes.  He told the group that Green House homes are delivering the results that Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in health care reform are looking for today.

 

The Woodlands at John Knox Village: Construction is underway for new Green House homes in southern Florida

The sunshine state lived up to its name when groundbreaking ceremonies took place on July 18th for 12 new Green House homes at John Knox Village (JKV) in Pompano Beach, Florida.

The event was a true celebration with approximately 350 Elders, local government officials, staff and leadership from JKV attending the event.

Susan Frazier, Chief Operating Officer of THE GREEN HOUSE® Project told the attendees, “We are here today to embrace something incredible.  The essence of the Green House model is not only to provide a real home for Elders, but to fill these homes with warmth and empower staff to create a loving environment.”

The Woodlands at JKV will feature six floors with two Green House homes on each floor.  Each home will have 12 private bedrooms and baths—along with a hearth area, open kitchen and dining room.  A total of 144 Elders will call this home.

To date, there have been a number of training and informational programs for the JKV community.  Implementation teams have been created to help guide the development of The Woodlands and the operational practices that will be incorporated once the homes open.

The first level of The Woodlands will feature a number of ammenties; 50 seat casual Bistro restaurant, a training center and kitchen, a  convocation room with a capacity up to 100 people for chapel services and other special events, and a state of the art short-term rehabilitation center.

The homes are expected to open in the Fall of 2015.

We congratulate everyone involved in the project!

Click here to read more about the project.

Keep Evolving

Live, Grow and Thrive. Three words that describe what we want every elder to experience in a Green House home. Three words that reflect the opportunity to learn, experience, and make positive developments in our lives. Something I believe we all want to encounter. So, it shouldn’t come as any surprise that the same could be said of the Green House model itself…we are always looking for ways to improve our product.

That was just one of the thoughts expressed by Green House Chief Operating Officer, Susan Frazier during a recent interview on the program, Senior Matters with Nadir Wright. “We will keep evolving this model. It’s one where there is on-going learning and growing, so that we can lead—or as I call it, a revolution to radically challenge and change traditional long term care.”

In fact, the host of the program referred to the Green House Project as a “beacon of hope and change.”

As you may know, the elder is at the center of everything we do. In a Green House home, you matter as an individual. As Susan explained, “It’s all about choice, power and control for the elder.”

Listen to the complete interview and find out why “words matter”, and the three components that are critical elements for the Green House home.