Green House Blog

Green House Featured on Panel at Ziegler CFO Workshop

Small House Nursing Homes is a trend that providers are recognizing as a solution to the growing workforce crisis, the pursuit of high quality at a lower cost and consumer demand.  Green House Senior Director, Susan Ryan, was invited to the Ziegler/LeadingAge 2018 CFO Workshop join a panel with Otterbein, and discuss, “Keys to Operating Successful Small House Models” .

The data presented during this session stemmed from the recently updated financial survey of Green House partners by Terri Metzker of Chi Partners.  In this survey, she explored the essential elements to achieve viability through comprehensive culture change.

To learn more about how Green House homes are faring in comparison to national trends and the importance of leadership to create sustainable results, please download the full webinar>>

Jefferson County Creates Sustainable Change Across Their Organization

In order to change the way that the world sees aging, it is important to not just implement The Green House model, but also to sustain it.  Through experience and research, we have found that this occurs most successfully when culture change exists throughout the organization, not just within The Green House homes.

JCNH Green House
Jefferson County Green House home

Jefferson County Nursing home in Tennessee opened their three Green House homes in 2010, and have experienced successful outcomes and stories of transformation.  As they look to the future, they have decided to partner again with The Green House Project on a process called, The Legacy Blueprint.  This program is offered to Green House organizations when they also have a legacy home to promote alignment of the core values and essential practices of The Green House model.  All elders, regardless of where they live, deserve a small, flexible and warm environment with opportunities for choice, and a sense of purpose.

Roger Mynatt, Executive Director of Jefferson County Nursing Home, shares, “We chose work with The Green House Project on the Legacy Blueprint because it will create the perfect bridge between the Legacy Building and our Green House homes.  We are taking the best of our mission and complimenting it with the Green House Core Values to create staff empowerment and person-directed care.”

Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010
Roger Mynatt with Dr. Bill Thomas, founder of The Green House model in 2010

To learn more about The Green House implementation process, click here to download Homes for Success

 

 

 

 

Collaborating for a “Sustainable” Future

The future demands that we work together to create viable and sustainable programs.  The world is a dynamic and ever-changing place, with an imperative to do more with less.  In order to achieve these outcomes, the charge is there to innovate and collaborate—pooling our resources and strengths, to evolve our communities. 

Recently, in New Orleans, The Green House Project team had two different opportunities to interact with thought leaders who are impacting the future.  First, we participated in  a round table discussion with Strategic Development Partners, where we joined a diverse group from healthcare, education and finance to contemplate the vision for sustainable, livable communities.  Next, during the AHCA-NCAL Independent Owners conference, the focus on quality as an economic imperative, sparked many substantive conversations about the role The Green House Project can play in long term care innovation.

 The concept of sustainable development was a continuing theme throughout the week,  but what does “sustainable” mean in this context?  The United Nations 2005 World Summit Outcome Document refers to the “interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars” of sustainable development as economic development, social development, and environmental protection. By investing in local culture and shifting thinking from “who are you building it for“, to “who are you building it with”, the potential is there to create value and a perpetuating impact for the community.

Through an initiative on quality, AHCA CEO, Mark Parkinson, imparted that to survive in this changing health care environment, providers need to diversify and adapt.  Sustainability is multi-fold, in order to be financially viable, the organization must have a keen focus on quality.  Parkinson said, “Quality is not just the right thing to do, it is an imperative to survive and be reimbursed in the future”.  AHCA is focusing on hospital readmissions, anti-psychotic drugs, staff retention and resident satisfaction as benchmarks to determine quality.    

The time in New Orleans, taught The Green House Project team many lessons about sustainability.  To survive and thrive, there must be a focus on the social, financial and environmental impact of innovation.  Ongoing benchmarking and data collection is necessary to ensure that there is an evidence base for the good work that is being done, and that our resources are being used effectively.  Most importantly, sustainable development requires participative discussion, and inclusion of many different stakeholders.  By bringing those “interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars” to the table, the end product has the power to create that integrated force for success!

Collaborating for a "Sustainable" Future

The future demands that we work together to create viable and sustainable programs.  The world is a dynamic and ever-changing place, with an imperative to do more with less.  In order to achieve these outcomes, the charge is there to innovate and collaborate—pooling our resources and strengths, to evolve our communities. 

Recently, in New Orleans, The Green House Project team had two different opportunities to interact with thought leaders who are impacting the future.  First, we participated in  a round table discussion with Strategic Development Partners, where we joined a diverse group from healthcare, education and finance to contemplate the vision for sustainable, livable communities.  Next, during the AHCA-NCAL Independent Owners conference, the focus on quality as an economic imperative, sparked many substantive conversations about the role The Green House Project can play in long term care innovation.

 The concept of sustainable development was a continuing theme throughout the week,  but what does “sustainable” mean in this context?  The United Nations 2005 World Summit Outcome Document refers to the “interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars” of sustainable development as economic development, social development, and environmental protection. By investing in local culture and shifting thinking from “who are you building it for“, to “who are you building it with”, the potential is there to create value and a perpetuating impact for the community.

Through an initiative on quality, AHCA CEO, Mark Parkinson, imparted that to survive in this changing health care environment, providers need to diversify and adapt.  Sustainability is multi-fold, in order to be financially viable, the organization must have a keen focus on quality.  Parkinson said, “Quality is not just the right thing to do, it is an imperative to survive and be reimbursed in the future”.  AHCA is focusing on hospital readmissions, anti-psychotic drugs, staff retention and resident satisfaction as benchmarks to determine quality.    

The time in New Orleans, taught The Green House Project team many lessons about sustainability.  To survive and thrive, there must be a focus on the social, financial and environmental impact of innovation.  Ongoing benchmarking and data collection is necessary to ensure that there is an evidence base for the good work that is being done, and that our resources are being used effectively.  Most importantly, sustainable development requires participative discussion, and inclusion of many different stakeholders.  By bringing those “interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars” to the table, the end product has the power to create that integrated force for success!