Green House Blog

The GREEN HOUSE Project Showcased in #ElderCareChat Discussion on Innovations in Senior Care

#ElderCareChat recap - OurParents.comThe GREEN HOUSE Project was pleased to join the April 25 #ElderCareChat, with Director of Operations Debbie Wiegand serving as an expert panelist. Wiegand engaged participants in an informative Twitter conversation about innovations in senior care while also describing how The GREEN HOUSE Project has come to be recognized as the leader in creating high-quality, cost-effective, and sustainable, human-scale alternatives to the traditional nursing home.

The hour-long #ElderCareChat put the need for innovative solutions in context, with Wiegand explaining how an aging population is driving the need for more senior care options. The topic was inspired by a recent blog post that discussed how the Green House model has become a catalyst for change in the field of long-term care. The model’s emphasis on creating a “real home” environment, with a look and feel that is residential rather than institutional, has gained considerable attention in the skilled nursing care space.

The Twitter session, which generated more than 3.4 million impressions and nearly 400 tweets, gave the 25 participants the opportunity to share their thoughts on a variety of topics, including what they perceived to be the major trends in senior care. One participant identified a movement toward more person-centered care. Another mentioned the need for a social/cultural change with regard to how we look at aging. In addition, several participants cited technology as having an increasing impact on senior care solutions.

In conjunction with an aging population, Wiegand sees an increasing demand for more innovative memory care solutions. “Correlated with the increasing number of elders is the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, and the need for high-quality models that focus on the whole person, rather than the traditional biomedical model that focuses primarily on decline and disease,” Wiegand tweeted, adding that a Green House program called “Best Life” was created to equipment caregivers with the knowledge and skills needed to help elders living with dementia thrive.

Wiegand also stressed the importance of frontline professionals building meaningful relationships with elders and their families. “Changing demographics exacerbate staffing challenges in nursing homes,” she observed. “Without the availability of quality jobs that offer expanded roles and opportunities for growth, the long-term care industry is at great risk for worker shortages.”

The chat also included a discussion of the advantages of smaller, more residential living spaces for elders. Wiegand explained that Green House homes are designed to create warmth and foster “intentional community.” “Smaller is better,” she tweeted, “meaning less square footage, which helps to support elder mobility, familiarity and access to all spaces of home, and reduce costs of construction.”

A chat participant observed that smaller, more intimate environments allow for better relationships with caregivers, tweeting, “The social, family atmosphere of residential living spaces eliminates the institutional stigma that is often associated with eldercare.”

Participants were highly receptive to innovative solutions being introduced to the long-term care space. As one senior care professional tweeted, “The day we stop innovating is the day we need to find a new job!”

“The GREEN HOUSE Project is all about relationships and deep knowing,” Wiegand concluded. “We embrace technology, but never at the expense of the human touch and connection.”

For those wanting to learn more, the GREEN HOUSE Project will host a webinar on workforce issues at 1 p.m. ET May 3. Register now.

In addition, The GREEN HOUSE Project is presenting opportunities to visit Green House homes and take a deep dive into the model at the following locations:

Feel free to peruse the transcript of the 4/25/18 #ElderCareChat session.

#ElderCareChat is presented by A Place for Mom‘s OurParents.com in conjunction with sister sites SeniorAdvisor.com and VeteranAid.org as a forum to share resources, experiences, and expertise in eldercare. Stay tuned to @OurParents Twitter handle for information regarding the next #ElderCareChat.

The Green House Project Attends Event at The White House

jewish home_white house
Representatives of The New Jewish Home including CEO, Audrey Weiner (right)

Policy makers have the potential to make a huge difference in the lives of elders and long term care providers.  Recently, The Green House Project participated in the Briefing on Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) Innovation and Technology.  Some innovations were technical in nature and some were a result of old fashioned intuition and common sense. The Administration and government representatives were duly impressed with what they heard through these AJAS presentations.

Green House adopter, The New Jewish Home, in Manhattan, NY, discussed their career growth program that develops young people for success in working with elders.  This opportunity to be in the hallowed walls of the White House, where so many important decisions are made, reminded us of the gravity of our work, and the impetus to create better places where we can age and work.

Technology: Where do we go from here?

Via: Long-Term Living Magazine

Many of us are always trying to determine what technology makes the most sense for our organization…it’s an important issue for day to day operations and of course it has real financial implications.

The Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Collaborative has announced its 2014-2016 Roadmap for technology adoption.  In light of a world filled with devices to keep us connected, it isn’t surprising that many parts of the roadmap deal with that specific issue:  staying connected!

The roadmap was unveiled on the final day of the Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Health IT Summit.  There are five key sections: connected workers, connected partners, connected residents and caregivers, connected health intelligence and connected business imperatives.

Click here to read the full story!

Green House project, Leonard Florence Center for Living, honored by McKnight’s Long Term News

Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass., is a prime example of the revolutionary potential of The Green House model. Leonard Florence Center for living includes homes that employ advanced assistive technology to allow individuals immobilized by ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and multiple sclerosis, to live more independently. Their innovations were recently honored by McKnight’s technology award, “Boston’s Chelsea Jewish Foundation won the top prize in the High Tech/High Touch category of McKnight’s Excellence in Technology Awards — Connect Our World.”

Congratulations to Leonard Florence Center for Living for this honor and thank you to McKnight’s Long Term Care News, for recognizing the power of The Green House model to create high touch, high tech environments that result in meaningful lives and excellent outcomes. click here to read the full article

 

Green House project, Leonard Florence Center for Living, honored by McKnight's Long Term News

Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass., is a prime example of the revolutionary potential of The Green House model. Leonard Florence Center for living includes homes that employ advanced assistive technology to allow individuals immobilized by ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and multiple sclerosis, to live more independently. Their innovations were recently honored by McKnight’s technology award, “Boston’s Chelsea Jewish Foundation won the top prize in the High Tech/High Touch category of McKnight’s Excellence in Technology Awards — Connect Our World.”

Congratulations to Leonard Florence Center for Living for this honor and thank you to McKnight’s Long Term Care News, for recognizing the power of The Green House model to create high touch, high tech environments that result in meaningful lives and excellent outcomes. click here to read the full article

 

The Green House Project Announces: The Interactive Brochure

The Green House Project is dynamic, interactive and cutting edge—and the ways that we communicate and share our message must align with that mentality. That is why, There is an App for That!
That is right, in The App Store for IPad, search “GHP” and you will have access to this unbelievable tool. In this free app, The Green House Project invites prospective partners to learn more about an exciting alternative to traditional nursing homes. For those who are not IPad equipped, don’t worry, you can access these materials through a Flash version on our website!
The Green House model finds roots in The Eden Alternative®. In The Green House model, the environment, philosophy and organizational structure combine to address the most profound problems occurring within nursing homes—loneliness, helplessness and boredom. Living and working in a Green House home empowers both elders and direct care staff. Download the app or view it on our website to explore this evidence-based model and its proven financial, clinical and regulatory success.

In The Green House Project app:
Videos and photos highlighting the unique philosophy, environment and organizational structure of Green House homes
– Video and written testimonials from partners, elders, staff and families
– Links to expanded information on the website, including floor plans, current Green House home locations and research articles
– Links to register for an informational webinar or orientation workshop