Green House Blog

Better Together: Caring Across Generations Campaign

“By 2030, twenty percent of our population will be over the age of 65. And by 2050, there will be 27 million people in this country who will need assistance with everyday living. As a nation, we cannot afford to not have a plan for this.”

This is how Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), challenged the audience to consider the reality of our Elder Boom during her Age of Dignity book talk last week at the AFL-CIO in Washington, D.C.

According to Ai-jen, one plan that will provide stability and protection for the most vulnerable among us is the creation of a national care grid to increase creative solutions and choices for those in need of long-term care. Some examples of innovative organizations that will make up the fabric of this grid are Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs), Villages and Green House homes.

As co-director of Caring Across Generations , Ai-jen encouraged the audience to recognize the importance of building a national movement to improve care.  She explained that we must protect what we have built so far and work together to create what we will need in the future.

Are you interested in joining this movement to transform care? Visit our Support the Movement page today and learn how to take action by becoming a part of the Caring Across Generations campaign.

 

THE GREEN HOUSE® Project in New York Press Article

Last week, the New York Press published an article  about the Health Policy Symposium recently hosted by Jewish Home Lifecare and the Himan Brown Charitable Trust in New York City. During the symposium, speakers discussed the needs of a rapidly aging population and the simultaneous decline in the health care workforce. One panelist, Dr. Ezekiel Emanual, a former special advisor to the White House, spoke to the importance of affordable and quality health care for aging adults.

Another panelist, Jane Lowe, Senior Advisor for Program Development at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, championed the Green House homes as “…better models for people to age with grace and dignity.” Ms. Lowe also showed her support for the Village model as another important new model of care for an aging population.

The New York Press article describes the Green House Project as a model that “…provides the support of a nursing home while still allowing its residents the autonomy, warmth, and respect of a traditional house or apartment.” The conclusion of the article is a description of Jewish Home Lifecare’s plan to develop Green House homes on a city scale at the Living Center of Manhattan. These will be the first Green House homes in New York City.

Currently, there are 146 Green House homes in 24 states, serving 1,539 elders. There are 123 homes in development.  Click here to find a Green House home near you!

Alternatives to Long Term Care Focus on the Elder

AARP‘s Caregiving Resource Center posted an article to address the, “90 percent of Americans prefer to stay home as they age”. There are alternatives  to traditional long term care that focus on the growth of the elder in their later years, and their well being rather than their decline:

Much like the Eden Alternative, The Green House Project caters to the life of the older adult rather than to their health needs only. The idea behind this project is to provide our loved ones with an excellent quality of life enriched by relationships with qualified staff who choose to work in an environment focused on enriching the life of the older adult. Taking the sterility out of long-term care, the Green House Project provides a warm environment with a focus on community, relationships, well-being and happiness — where there is a true “heart” to the home.

 

The opportunity to age in community with the needed resources, including skilled nursing care, allows the elder to remain connected to the place and people that they have loved throughout their lives, and changes the paradigm of long term care. The AARP article highlights, The Eden Alternative, The Green House Project, and The Village models as alternatives to Long Term Care that are changing the landscape of what it means to grow old.

To read the full article, and gather additional resources, click here.