Green House Blog

The White House Conference On Aging Releases a Final Report

“In a year that marked the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security, the White House Conference on Aging provided an opportunity to reflect on the importance of these programs, highlight new actions to support Americans as we age, and focus on the powerful role that technology can play in lives of seniors in the decade ahead.”  –Cecilia Munoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council

WHCOA_picThe Green House Project was honored to participate and be highlighted during the 2015 White House Conference on Aging.  “Through a combination of listening sessions, breakout groups, watch parties, regional and topical forums, and written feedback, the White House heard from thousands of Americans about the issues most important to them regarding our aging population.”  Click here to read the final report for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging that summarizes the work of the White House to create a fulfilling and dignified world for elders and those who work closest to them.

One highlight was a visit by Executive Director of The White House Conference on Aging, Nora Super, to Leonard Florence Center for living, the first urban Green House model, located outside of Boston.  There, Ms. Super engaged in dialogue with elders and staff members to learn how The Green House model creates caring homes and meaningful lives for those who live and work there.  This opportunity gave the model a national stage to share the impact that it can have for elders and staff in long term care.

White House Conference on Aging Executive Director, Nora Super, pictured with Green House and Leonard Florence team members
White House Conference on Aging Executive Director, Nora Super, pictured with Green House and Leonard Florence team members

 

THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

For Immediate Release: Friday, July 10, 2015

 Contact: Rachel McLean, rmclean@capitalimpact.org, 703-850-1897

Kavan Peterson, kavanpeterson@gmail.com, 206-305-2798

 

THE GREEN HOUSE PROJECT REPRESENTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

Innovative Model for Elder Care Receives Attention from National Leadership

Arlington, VA: The Green House Project’s landmark approach to skilled nursing care will be highlighted at the White House Conference on Aging.  The objective of the conference, which happens only once every 10 years, is to identify and advance actions to improve the quality of life of older Americans, and to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

Since 2003, Green House homes have gone beyond simply providing quality medical care to elders: they’ve offered an environment and support system that enables each person to retain their individuality, and to live in a real home.

Nora Super, executive director at the White House Conference on Aging, recently visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Massachusetts and video footage from this visit will be shown during the event.  This conference will draw greater attention to the model that is changing the face of elder care throughout the country.

“We live in an exciting era of growth and change in which outdated models of long term care are, at long last, being disrupted and replaced,” said Bill Thomas, geriatrician and founder of The Green House Project, who will attend the conference. “I am delighted that the White House Conference on Aging will be bringing well deserved attention to how we’re helping America reimagine care and caregiving in the 21st Century.”

Green House homes, which serve only 10-12 elders at a time, have private rooms and baths and a common, open kitchen. Supportive and versatile caregivers deliver outstanding care and engage in deep knowing relationships with elders. By comprehensively transforming the architecture, organizational design and philosophy of care, the model provides elders with high quality health care and a high quality of life that far exceeds the experience in traditional nursing homes.

In 2003, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation helped pioneer the first Green House home in Tupelo, Mississippi. Today, more than 180 Green House homes are in existence in 28 states across the country, and more than 150 are in development.

Not only are Green House homes rising in popularity, they have been shown to reduce costs of care and treatment and offer a solution to delivering higher quality care at a competitive cost in the U.S.

“The Green House model is based in the belief that all people deserve to live their whole life to its fullest,” said Susan Frazier, senior director of The Green House Project. “With a decade of proven success, we are at a tipping point for the growth of this model and see the power that real home has on the health and wellbeing of elders and those who love them.”

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The Green House Project

A partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Capital Impact Partners and the Center for Growing and Becoming, The Green House Project provides consulting, organizational development services,  and ongoing support to providers and local organizations to support the development and operation of Green House homes across the country. To date, more than 180 Green Home homes are in operation.

 

 

The White House and The Green House Tour the Leonard Florence Center for Living

This week, representatives from the White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) and THE GREEN HOUSE ® Project visited the Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) in Chelsea, MA. The Center is the first urban Green House skilled nursing community in the country. Nora Super, Executive Director (WHCOA) and Rachel Maisler, Deputy Communications Director (WHCOA) traveled from Washington to see, first hand, how The Green House model supports a successful aging and good jobs.  Senior Director of The Green House Project, Susan Frazier and Director of Outreach, Scott Brown, were in attendance; Betsy Mullen, COO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates LFCL, directed the visit.WHCOA Tour picture May 2015

The visit began by spending time with a group of elders who were celebrating National Senior Health & Fitness Day.  Amidst songs and dancing, it was clear that these people are living life to the fullest.  Winnie Murphy, who is 105, told the group she loved living at the LFCL because there “was always something to do and people to visit.” In fact, Winnie is engaged in meaningful activities every day; she goes to the salon to get her hair done about once a week, relaxes with a drink at the monthly Pub Hour, plays bingo as often as possible and attends a daily exercise class.

A key focus of the visit was to highlight the increased quality of life that elders and staff experience in The Green House model.  Because of the high rise setting, the ground floor of the building has become a “main street” of sorts.  The group spent time in the café, deli, spa and outdoor patios as well as the residences where elders receive long-term care and short term rehabilitation.  It was gratifying to see Ms. Super’s reaction to each elder having a private bedroom and bathroom, and the sense of comfort and belonging that one feels in the open floor plan with accessible kitchens and dining areas in every home.  Clearly, this revolutionary model of living made a tremendous impact upon the visitors, which will hopefully lead to tremendous impacts in policy to support the spread of this model across the country.

An added plus: the WHCOA team sent a camera crew to video-tape the tour. We are hopeful that this footage will be featured at the White House Conference on Aging, to be held in Washington, DC on July 13.